The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com You're Never Alone Thu, 05 Mar 2015 13:07:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes http://theinvisiblementor.com/babette-bensoussan-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/babette-bensoussan-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/#respond Thu, 05 Mar 2015 13:07:25 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17692 Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes  Yesterday, I started the series of the mini-interviews I conducted while participating in the Virtual Literary World Tour. Today, we are visiting Australia and we will see it through the eyes of Babette Bensoussan. We will talk about places to visit, favorite Australian books, and music. […]

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Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes 

Babette Bensoussan

Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes

Yesterday, I started the series of the mini-interviews I conducted while participating in the Virtual Literary World Tour. Today, we are visiting Australia and we will see it through the eyes of Babette Bensoussan. We will talk about places to visit, favorite Australian books, and music. The emphasis today is less on recipes, and more on books. Picnic at Hanging Rock is a book I have been meaning to read because it is on one of the lists of must-read books.

Related Post

Excerpt from Book Summaries: Around the World in 120 Days, Week Seven 

Interview with Babette Bensoussan 

Avil Beckford: As an Australian, if someone asked you why they should visit Australia, what five pieces of advice would you give to them? 

Babette Bensoussan:

  1. Australia is a vast country and continent and as such the flora and fauna are unique to this continent. It has some of the most beautiful beaches in the world – a must visit is the Great Barrier Reef.  Essentially a country and continent to visit before you die!  Just beautiful from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean.
  2. This country is as big as the USA in land area with a population of only 25 million, so if you decide to go to the outback or travel to remote areas (there are plenty to explore), ensure you have a roadworthy vehicle fitted with GPS and spare tyres. You’ll also need good maps, extra food, water and fuel and an emergency plan. Plan your route carefully and always notify a third party of your expected arrival.
  3. Wear sun protection!  The Australian sun is very strong…
  4. Your local Aussie is kind, hospitable and helpful.
  5. Keep in mind that we have the most poisonous creatures on the planet here – from spiders, snakes to sharks and marine stingers. 

Avil Beckford: What would be your arguments? 

Babette Bensoussan: Australia is a unique continent with a truly amazing natural beauty.  It is an advanced Western economy, with a stable political system, well-maintained roads, low crime rate and high standard of health care.  It is therefore a safe and relatively easy country to explore.  So when are you coming? 

Avil Beckford: What five books would you recommend for them to read, and hopefully one of the books would be by or about a prominent Australian. 

Babette Bensoussan Book Recommendations

  1. Fortunate Life by Albert Facey (one of my favourite books of all time!)
  2. Any of the works of Henry Lawson or Banjo Patterson (Poets – gives you a real sense of the Aussie life)
  3. The Slap: A Novel by Christos Tsolkias – a modern Australian story about our prejudices and cultural issues.
  4. Tyranny of Distance by Geoffrey Blainey – this is an old book but explains so well the extraordinary impact of distance on Australia and its development as a nation.
  5. Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsey – a good mystery. 

Avil Beckford: What is your favourite Australian dish and what is the recipe? 

Babette Bensoussan: My favourite dish is anything that is barbecued!!  We have prawns on the barbie, steaks, burgers, fish, you name it!  Anything served from a barbecue with a salad, and I am in heaven….

We do have some unique foods such as Lamingtons, ANZAC Biscuits and Vegemite.  I will let you explore those for yourself!!  Here is a link to some interesting Aussie foods…..http://travel.cnn.com/sydney/eat/40-foods-australians-call-their-own-651613 

Avil Beckford: Who is your favourite Australian musician? 

Babette Bensoussan: I have a number such as Kylie Minogue, Percy Grainger, Guy Sebastin, however Peter Allen would have to be at my top… I love many of his songs with my favourite being “I still call Australia home”. 

About Babette Bensoussan: Babette is best known as an international specialist and author in strategy and competition, and as founder and director of The MindShifts Group.  She is a brilliant presenter and communicator, and conducts training, workshops and individual mentoring on a worldwide basis to assist with the development and implementation of competitive strategies, competitive intelligence programs, and strategic planning.  As a qualified counsellor, certified coach and MBTI practitioner, Babette set up a second business uniquely for coaching executives and entrepreneurs in achieving their goals.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Marcia Mayne: Travel the World through Books and Recipes http://theinvisiblementor.com/marcia-mayne-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/marcia-mayne-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/#respond Wed, 04 Mar 2015 14:01:30 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17688 Travel the World through Books and Recipes Excerpt from Book Summaries: Around the World in 120 Days, Week Two, Day One  Have you ever try to do too many things at once so each thing didn’t get the care it deserved? While working on the Virtual Literary World Tour in 2013, I got the novel idea […]

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Travel the World through Books and Recipes

Excerpt from Book Summaries: Around the World in 120 Days, Week Two, Day One 

Marcia Mayne

Marcia Mayne: Travel the World through Books and Recipes

Have you ever try to do too many things at once so each thing didn’t get the care it deserved? While working on the Virtual Literary World Tour in 2013, I got the novel idea of conducting mini-interviews with people from all over the world. The interviews were not the signature invisible mentor interview since the focus was primarily on interviewee’s favorite books, the places in their countries they recommend others to visit and favorite recipes. Because the main focus of the Literary World Tour was on the books I was reading, some of this great information got buried. For the next few days, I will feature these interviews. One setback is that I didn’t ask the interviewees to send me a photo of their favorite recipe. I am starting off with Marcia Mayne since I am heading to Jamaica in a couple of days.

Related Post

Book Summaries: Around the World in 120 Days, Week Two, Day One 

Interview with Marcia Mayne

Avil Beckford: What are five books that you would recommend as must-reads? (Five books that profoundly moved you).

  1. The Painted Canoe , Anthony Winkler
  2. In My Father’s Shade, Rachel Manley
  3. The Harder They Come, Michael Thelwell
  4. From Harvey River: A Memoir of My Mother and Her Island, Lorna Goodison
  5. The Children of Sisyphus (Caribbean Modern Classics), Orlando Patterson
Collection of Photos Avil Took While in Jamaica

Collection of Photos Avil Took While in Jamaica

Avil Beckford: If you wanted to convince others to visit Jamaica, what would your argument be?

Marcia Mayne: Jamaica’s beauty lies in the smiles of her people, the warmth of their hospitality, her fascinating history and her many and varied natural resources.

With its close proximity to the US mainland, it’s the perfect destination for a quick beach getaway or a longer trip to explore some of the island’s historic great houses, wander its Georgian towns, or discover some of its 24 species of endemic birds.

Jamaica is blessed with a plethora of natural attractions including the legendary Dunn’s River Falls, YS Falls’ with its seven natural falls, the majestic Blue Mountains, tropical wetlands, underground caves, the 500 species of tropical ferns that line the protected 3-mile Fern Gully gorge, and Negril’s famous 7-mile beach from where you can catch the most spectacular sunset in the Caribbean.

It’s always summer in Jamaica.

Avil Beckford: What places would they have to visit?

Marcia Mayne: Greenwood or Good Hope Great House, Falmouth, Dunn’s River or YS Falls, Negril (Rick’s Cafe to watch the sun set and the cliff divers) or any of the north coast beaches, rafting on the Rio Grande or the Martha Brae River, the Blue Mountains.

Avil Beckford: What’s your favourite dish, and what is the recipe?

Marcia Mayne: Escoveitched Fish is one of my favourites. Here’s my recipe:

Escoveitched Fish Recipe

3 lbs. fish (whole)
4 tsp. black pepper and 3 tsp salt, combined
2 or 3 limes (or lemons)
1 Scotch Bonnett pepper or other hot pepper, cut in strips
1/2 cup oil for frying
2 cups vinegar
1 tsp. pimento seeds
2 large onions, sliced
1/2 tsp. of whole black pepper grains

  1. Wash fish thoroughly in water to which juice of limes have been added. Dry thoroughly. When dry, sprinkle the fish on both sides and on the inside with salt and pepper. Set aside on paper towels. (Note: Paper towels will absorb any liquid from the fish so the hot oil doesn’t pop or splash when you put it in. You can also coat both sides of the fish lightly with flour.)
  2.  Heat oil in frying pan to boiling and fry fish on both sides until nice and crisp. Set aside, preferably in a glass bowl.
  3.  Pour vinegar into a saucepan, add sliced onions, peppers, pimento seeds and whole black pepper grains. Bring to a boil then let simmer until onions are tender. Remove from fire and let cool.
  4.  Pour over fish and leave overnight (or for at least 4 hours) so the fish can soak up the mixture.
  5.  Serve with Festival (flour and cornmeal dumplings), bammie (made from cassava), or rice and peas. Escoveitched fish can be eaten at any meal.

Avil Beckford: Who is your favourite musician from?

Marcia Mayne: I have several favorites: Beres Hammond, Monty Alexander, Tarrus Riley, and Bob Marley.

Marcia Mayne travels a world full of books, music, art, fun people and great food. She raves about them constantly. Currently, she is journeying through Jamaica, her home country, and writing about the places she missed at her blog http://insidejourneys.com.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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7 Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read http://theinvisiblementor.com/7-great-books-that-you-probably-havent-read/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/7-great-books-that-you-probably-havent-read/#respond Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:19:20 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17680 7 Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read This week we are taking a trip down memory lane, so I am diving deep into the archives. I have a lot of new readers, who would enjoy some of the older book reviews. After the sudden death of my brother last week, I am reminded how […]

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7 Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read

Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read

7 Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read

This week we are taking a trip down memory lane, so I am diving deep into the archives. I have a lot of new readers, who would enjoy some of the older book reviews. After the sudden death of my brother last week, I am reminded how fleeting life is. While I am trying to come to terms with all I am going through, I have to admit, that after working on client projects, I do not have the energy to write an epic blog post. I hope that you can understand where I am coming from, but it is in this state of mind that I am able to see new ways of presenting old information. Below, you will find some great books that you probably haven’t read, and they might surprise you.

  1. Review of The Right Questions: Ten Essential Questions to Guide You to an Extraordinary Life, Debbie Ford: When I saw the title of this book, The Right Questions: Ten Essential Questions To Guide You To An Extraordinary Life, I grabbed it from the shelf without reading the subheading or the description on the back. The title grabbed me because as a researcher/interviewer, I understood the importance of asking the right questions. When I started to read the book, it wasn’t quite what I expected, but it was exactly what I needed at that time. The 10 questions will make you think and are worth answering.
  1. Review of Bunker Bean by Harry Leon Wilson: Although Bunker Bean is an excellent book, it took me two attempts to complete it. The character, Bunker Bean drove me nuts because he is so simple-minded and gullible. You will find certain sections of the book difficult to read because the character speaks very bad English. Persist reading because you will learn some important lessons.
  1. Review of Wake Up and Live: After evaluating her life, Dorothea Brande, realized that, like so many others, she was not living up to her true potential. She came across a formula for success – act as if it were impossible to fail – which transformed her life. A writer by trade, Brande’s output soared after her eureka moment. By Dorothea Brande – Wake Up and Live! (3.6.2013) is based on Dorothea Brande’s experience. The book is worth reading to get yet another perspective on living a fulfilled life.
  1. Review of The PhotoReading Whole Mind System by Paul Scheele: If you are interested in reading faster, Photoreading, 3rd Edition by Paul Scheele is another option for you. The process consists of five stages – preparing, previewing, PhotoReading, activating, and rapid reading, and the book walks you through the stages. It’s a great book, but I think that the process is too involved to completely grasp the concept. I think you will also have to attend the course.
  1. Review: Awaken the Genius: Mind Technology for the 21st Century by Patrick K. Porter: Patrick Porter defines awakened geniuses as “those who have learned to tap that superconscious reservoir of information so as never to waste time or energy in recreating the wheel. They simply make modifications and enhancements until they move forward with optimum speed and efficiency.” Awaken the Genius: Mind Technology for the 21st Century is a practical guide filled with lots of exercises. For example, there is one exercise that helps you to figure out your preferred mode of communication – visual, auditory or kinesthetic.
  1. Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read

    7 Great Books That You Probably Haven’t Read

    Review: Superlearning 2000 by Sheila Ostrander and Lynn Schroeder: The book is chock full of techniques, tools and resources to assist the reader in learning faster, remembering more of what they read, and optimizing their brain capacity by using both sides of their brain. You have to choose a few techniques that you think you will actually try because it is highly unlikely that you can try them all.

  1. Review of The New Birth Order by Dr. Kevin Leman: After reading The New Birth Order Book: Why You are the Way You are, I had mixed feelings about it. The New Birth Order is entertaining, yet insightful, and packed with a lot of interesting information, but I think there is too much going on. To get the most from this book, I suggest that you read the first ten chapters and use the Table of Contents to decide which other chapters to read. The book includes a lot of parenting information in the later chapters, but do not let this deter you, because by just reading the first ten chapters you would have gotten your money’s worth.

How many of the seven great books have you heard of before, and how many of them have you read?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Have You Read These 8 Books by Authors from Asia? http://theinvisiblementor.com/have-you-read-these-8-books-by-authors-from-asia/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/have-you-read-these-8-books-by-authors-from-asia/#respond Mon, 02 Mar 2015 10:20:21 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17656 Have You Read These 8 Books by Authors from Asia? This year I am celebrating reading globally. I have visited my archives and pulled out eight books written by authors from Asia that you may want to read. Although many of the books are well written, I didn’t always enjoy them. One book is a […]

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Have You Read These 8 Books by Authors from Asia?

8 Books by Authors from Asia

Have you Read These 8 Books by Authors from Asia?

This year I am celebrating reading globally. I have visited my archives and pulled out eight books written by authors from Asia that you may want to read. Although many of the books are well written, I didn’t always enjoy them. One book is a bit dark for my liking, but I am still glad that I read it. I am presenting the books because reading books by authors from countries that are very different from our own gives us insights into what life is like in other places. This also allows us to better understand them. After you have read the posts about the eight books by authors from Asia, you can decide if you would like to read any of them.

Further Reading

Reading Globally: Travel the World in 120 Days with The Invisible Mentor 

8 Books by Authors from Asia

  1. The Art of War by Sun Tzu, Book Review: Whenever I read classics such as The Art Of War, The Way of the Samurai and The Book of Five Rings, I always look for metaphors to make the text relevant for today. Sun Tzu, a Chinese philosopher, military general, and strategist from 722481 BC wrote The Art of War, which is one of the earliest books on military strategy. In The Art of War, Sun Tzu says that there are 5 constant factors that you have to consider when you’re planning your military strategy.
  1. Review: Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu is a guidebook of Chinese philosophy and tenets to live by. Lao Tzu lived in the 6th century BC and is believed to be a contemporary of Confucius. Tao Te Ching is comprised of 81 wisdom teachings, so it’s a short book to read.
  1. Review of The Book of Five Rings: The Classic Guide to Strategy, Miyamoto Musahi: I reviewed Book of Five Rings: The Classic Guide to Strategy for my newsletter Ambeck Edge in Nov. 2005. The Book of Five Rings, written in 1645, is about the “Way of Strategy,” which is using certain techniques to take down the enemy. Because of when the book was written, you have to be aware of the imagery and language used – enemy, weapon, combat, sword, cutting and so on. Once you get beyond that, and use those words as metaphors, you can glean a lot from the book.
  1. The Way of the Samurai by Inazo Nitobe: Overall, I didn’t like The Way of the Samurai because of the imagery, but there are some profound lessons that we can learn. This quote moved me, “Courage is doing what is right….Tranquility is courage in repose. A truly brave man is ever serene; he is never taken by surprise; nothing ruffles the equanimity of his spirit. If there is anything to do, there is certainly a best way to do it, and the best way is both.”
  1. The Analects of Confucius, Book Review: The Analects of Confucius is a collection of the teachings of Confucius, the Chinese philosopher and great thinker who lived 551 BC – 479 BC. Presented as a series of discourses and dialogues that Confucius had with his disciples, The Analects of Confucius was written by his disciples several years after he died. The Analects consists of 20 Books (Chapters) and is essentially a rule book of life.
  1. Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami: The story is centered on Toru Watanabe, a quiet and very serious university student in Tokyo. Toru is telling the story 20 years later. He is very devoted to Naoko, a beautiful and introspective young woman who was his best friend, Kizuki’s girlfriend. The trio often did things together until Kizuki committed suicide. As I am reading Norwegian Wood, the way the story is written, I have this sense foreboding that Naoko is doomed and that she is going to commit suicide. Norwegian Wood made me very uncomfortable, and I do not know if this is a good or bad thing. Is it good writing when an author creates such strong reactions in people?
  1. Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior by Chogyam Trungpa: Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior by Chogyam Trungpa is the kind of book that you have to read for yourself. A summary cannot adequately deliver the true essence of what Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior is about. The book is about Eastern philosophy, which is more common today in the West. The author tries to demonstrate what he is writing about so you might understand and appreciate his message. There are times when Chogyam Trungpa says something that sounds odd, but when you pause to reflect on what you just heard it makes complete sense to you.
  1. Ru: A Novel by Kim Thúy: I was reminded of a mature student I met in Calgary who came over on a boat from Vietnam. In his efforts to avoid persecution in his home country, he took the risk and during his journey he lost both legs. He was a very angry man, and now having read Ru: A Novel by Kim Thúy I can better understand his anger. This was more than two decades ago, and at the time, although he had a brilliant mind, his inability to speak English fluently, and his anger created barriers for him. Knowing his story, and similar stories of countless people, how might we embrace them and be more compassionate?

If you are interested in reading globally, this is a great place to start!

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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10 Lessons from Jess Williams, Bounty Hunter http://theinvisiblementor.com/10-lessons-from-jess-williams-bounty-hunter/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/10-lessons-from-jess-williams-bounty-hunter/#respond Sun, 01 Mar 2015 13:50:09 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17651 10 Lessons from Jess Williams, Bounty Hunter Every so often I like to read a book from Jess Williams series of books. Based on what is going on the novels, I would say that the stories are set in the 1800s. Written by Robert J Thomas, the author will not win any book awards for […]

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10 Lessons from Jess Williams, Bounty Hunter

lessons from Jess Williams

10 Lessons from Jess Williams, Bounty Hunter

Every so often I like to read a book from Jess Williams series of books. Based on what is going on the novels, I would say that the stories are set in the 1800s. Written by Robert J Thomas, the author will not win any book awards for these books because there isn’t much depth to the stories, although there is depth to the character, Jess Williams. I have read about seven of the 36 books so far in the series, and I do so when I need to engage in mindless reading. I am going through a rough patch, trying to come to terms with the sudden death of my brother. While I was reading Redemption, the thirty-sixth book, I was thinking about all the lessons we can learn from the main character, Jess Williams, who is a bounty hunter.

Jess Williams is a bounty hunter, so he tracks criminals for a living. He carries around many Wanted posters, deciding any moment in time, which ones he will go after first. These felons are often wanted Dead or Alive, so Williams often brings them in dead to collect his reward. Jess Williams is very good at his profession, he knows it and so do others. And he is feared, felons are always trying to elude him. What I find interesting, is that although he knows that he is the best, he doesn’t allow his ego to get in the way, because that will get him killed in no time. I am not saying that killing another person is noble, but I am stripping away what he does for a living, and solely looking at the way he works. We also have to remember that the story is set in a time very different from our own, where the legal system was not as developed.

10 Lessons from Jess Williams

  1. Jess Williams has a code by which he lives. He has drawn a line in the sand, and knows which lines he will not cross.
  2. When chasing an outlaw, he takes calculated risks, and that’s what the most successful people do.
  3. He doesn’t take anything at face value, he peels off the skin until he gets to the core.
  4. After gathering information, he thinks things through, makes a decision, and lives with it.
  5. Keeps his ego in check, and takes precaution to keep himself safe.
  6. Works hard, but takes time to decompress.
  7. He treats others fairly. For instance, if a sheriff processes his reward quickly, he gives him 10 percent of the reward. This is significant because they seldom get paid very well for a dangerous job.
  8. Recognizes that the world is more than about him. For instance, in Redemption, the latest book in the series, one of the outlaws Jess Williams is chasing is very mean, and doesn’t have a conscience. The outlaw rides over a little boy’s foot, crushing the bone. The child will lose his foot because the doctor in the small town is not equipped to do the proper surgery. Jess Williams gives the mother the money, and pays the doctor to escort them to New York, where they have more up-to-date medical equipment. In the books in the series that I have read, I have seen this throughout. This is a major life lesson.
  9. He is fiscally responsible and lives simply. He doesn’t waste money, and in several of the books I have read, he often advises the sheriff in a town to wire the money to his bank account, if he cannot wait around for it.
  10. He possesses the tools of the trade so that he can execute his job effectively (I feel weird writing this because of his profession, but we agreed that we were not going to focus how much on what he does for a living).

It’s amazing the lessons we can learn from the most unexpected places, if we are mindful!

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Read More Books Now, New Way to Read Books and Sarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge http://theinvisiblementor.com/read-more-books-now-new-way-to-read-books-and-sarah-arrows-blogging-challenge/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/read-more-books-now-new-way-to-read-books-and-sarah-arrows-blogging-challenge/#respond Sat, 28 Feb 2015 14:24:28 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17647 Read More Books Now, New Way to Read Books and Sarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge Week in Review: If at first you don’t succeed try and try again, A New Way to Think about Reading Books, Sarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge – Take Your Blogging to the Next Level, Important Life Lessons from Children’s Books, and Read […]

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Read More Books Now, New Way to Read Books and Sarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge

Week in Review: If at first you don’t succeed try and try again, A New Way to Think about Reading Books, Sarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge – Take Your Blogging to the Next Level, Important Life Lessons from Children’s Books, and Read More Books Now.

read more books

Read More Books Now, New Way to Read Books and Sarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge

The Invisible Mentor Week in Review: February 23 – 27, 2015

Monday – If at first you don’t succeed try and try again: For 2015, I decided to host a reading challenge, where participants read a book a week for 52 weeks. Although the reading challenge is to read a book each week, I should have made it clear that it would be okay for participants to read less than 4 books each month. After participating in the 30 Day Blogging Challenge, I realized what I could have done better.

TuesdayA New Way to Think about Reading Books: People ask me all the time if I read entire books and I say yes, because I do, but I have to admit that it’s time to change my way of reading books. But there are different approaches and techniques to reading books so that you can read even more. The time for applying what I know to reading books the new way is now.

WednesdaySarah Arrow’s Blogging Challenge – Take Your Blogging to the Next Level: I completed Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge, and it has made me a much better blogger. I plan to repeat the process because there was so much good information. Learn why you should join the challenge if you are a blogger.

ThursdayImportant Life Lessons from Children’s Books: As an adult, it’s is important to read the right children’s books because they teach some important life lessons. Learn what some of the children’s books to read are. For instance, have you ever read The Little Engine That Could? How about Charlotte’s Web?

FridayRead More Books Now: There are simple strategies to start reading more books. In this blog post, you will learn about some of these from Brandon Vogt, who created the short video course, Read More Books. His course complements what I have been writing about reading books on this blog.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge and The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Read More Books Now! http://theinvisiblementor.com/read-more-books-now/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/read-more-books-now/#respond Fri, 27 Feb 2015 16:14:56 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17642 Read More Books Now! A couple of weeks ago I learned about some free video training on Read More Books Now created by Brandon Vogt. I watched the videos knowing that he would probably be selling a course at the end since that’s the custom these days. I committed to buying the course if it was […]

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Read More Books Now!

read more books

Read More Books Now!

A couple of weeks ago I learned about some free video training on Read More Books Now created by Brandon Vogt. I watched the videos knowing that he would probably be selling a course at the end since that’s the custom these days. I committed to buying the course if it was under a certain price point. The short video training was well done and he said many things that I agreed with. One exception was his advice to people to read while eating to read more books. I bought the training, “Read More Books” for an introductory price of $37. The total training is just under 100 minutes. There are 10 videos and most of them are less than 10 minutes long.

After watching all the videos, I can safely say that I already knew 95 percent of what he had to say. But I think the five percent is worth the $37. Most people who read this blog know that I know a lot about books and reading. Some of you may be asking, “So, why take the course?” And I will give the same answer to why did I join a 30 day blogging challenge after I had been blogging for close to six years — I don’t know what I know. And this year is the year when I step up and quit being the best kept secret. After watching Brandon Vogt’s training on Reading More Books, I can say his audience are people who do not read books or those who want to step up their reading a notch.

Further Reading

Famous Personal Libraries Inspire Reading

In one of the video teasers to entice people to buy his training, he mentioned that to read more books, read while eating, and my comment was that meal times are community building time, and also when you read while eating you tend to overeat. In the paid training, Vogt clarified that you should read more books while eating alone. I still have issues with that, you will overeat if you are doing other things while eating. I do not understand society’s obsession with multitasking. The studies show that multitasking doesn’t work. The other thing I object strongly to, is his advice to have a book on the passenger seat to read while waiting in traffic. I usually have a book with me, so I read while riding the subway, and I have missed my stop countless times because I was so engrossed in the book. Can you imagine reading while waiting in traffic?

Now that I have gotten that off my chest, I am glad that I got the program because it reminded me that I have to reread How to Read a Book: The Classic Guide to Intelligent Reading (A Touchstone book) by Mortimer Adler, which I read a few years ago. I have mentioned several times here that How to Read a Book is one that you have to read more than once to digest all the great information. I particularly liked the section in Vogt training where he devoted a video to x-raying a book, which he took from Adler’s book. I will definitely read that section again.

Brandon Vogt tells you how to start a personal library, and I wrote a post on the topic, but he mentions that you can get great books at estate sales and buying used books from Amazon. I didn’t have those tips in my blog post.

Related Post

Creating a Personal Library

Vogt also deals with reading broadly, which I have talked about extensively here, but he also spent time advising us on using different formats of reading such as print, audio and e-books to mix things up. I do not listen to audio books because they put me to sleep, but perhaps they will work for you. He also recommends that readers read a stack of different books at the same time because the topics will rarely blur into each other. This doesn’t work for me – I do not finish any of them because I feel scattered. I have to read a book a time. However, I know people, who this technique works very well for them, so give it a try. If you do decide to buy Brandon Vogt program, think about what you are hearing, and if any piece of advice doesn’t work for you, toss it out.

Read More Books Now, is a program that I was qualified to create, but didn’t, Brandon Vogt did, and he deserves accolades. I would like you to support him by purchasing the program. It’s worth looking into, and if you have browsed through my posts, you will find a lot of similar information, but from a different voice, which is a good thing. His work complements mine!

Related Reading to Support Reading More Books Now

A New Way to Think about Reading Books
Speed Reading: Collection of Articles to Help You Read Faster
Make a choice, stick to it, pace yourself!
How to Read 30 Books in 30 Days
The 10% Rule: How to Read More Than 42+ Books a Year
How to Read 40 Books a Year (the nerdy way)
16 Skills to Make Your Reading More Productive
6 important things you should know about how your brain learns
How to Remember 90% of Everything You Learn
How to Read More Books This Year Than Most People Read in Their Life – Part 1
How to Read More Books This Year Than Most People Read in Their Life – Part 2

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Important Life Lessons from Children’s Books http://theinvisiblementor.com/important-life-lessons-from-childrens-books/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/important-life-lessons-from-childrens-books/#respond Thu, 26 Feb 2015 14:25:24 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17628 Important Life Lessons from Children’s Books I cannot remember a time when I wasn’t reading books. But looking back to my childhood, I realize that many of the children’s books that I read are the Disney version. In the last two years, especially while I was on The Virtual Literary World Tour, I read the […]

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Important Life Lessons from Children’s Books

life lessons from children's books

Important Life Lessons from Children’s Books

I cannot remember a time when I wasn’t reading books. But looking back to my childhood, I realize that many of the children’s books that I read are the Disney version. In the last two years, especially while I was on The Virtual Literary World Tour, I read the original version of some of those stories and you get an appreciation for Disney. Have you read The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: The Complete First Edition, some of those stories will give you nightmares? But for me, I always like to return to the original sources. Additionally, in the past five years, I have read many children’s books that I didn’t have access to in Jamaica. I gleaned many important life lessons from children’s books that I would like to share with you. It is also worth reading Hans Christian Andersen’s Complete Fairy Tales (Leather-bound Classics).

Review of The Little Engine That Could: I decided to review The Little Engine That Could (Little Letters Edition) by Watty Piper because it was one of 21 books that Ted Nicholas read that changed his life. The book is about a happy train that is loaded with toys of all kinds for children as well as some food stuff. Despite its small size, the little blue engine repeated the mantra “I think I can” over and over again and pulled the train over the mountain. This is a fantastic book that teaches us that persistence pays along with other important life lessons.

Related Post

The Uber Successful Make Time for Reading, Do You

10 Leadership Lessons from Watership Down: Although Watership Down: A Novel is found in the tweens section in the bookstore, I am not convinced that children of that age can process the information in the book. I consider this book to be a great book on leadership. In the story, humans are taking up more and more land, so the rabbits are forced to leave their warren. Fiver and his brother Hazel go to see the Chief Rabbit, Threarah meaning ‘Lord Rowan Tree begging him to evacuate the warren. They fail to convince Threarah, but they persuade their friends Blackberry and Dandelion of the danger and ask them to try to persuade the other rabbits to join them as they take up the quest. A few rabbits go on this journey and Hazel is the unlikely leader, and we see for ourselves that leaders are made. As they overcome challenge after challenge, life lessons include – persistence pays, and to lead others, you must first lead yourself.

Reading Children's Books can Teach Important Life Lessons - InfographicThe Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis: Children have a very vivid imagination and often dream big dreams, but as they grow older, they often lose it because society discourages that trait. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a very imaginative work from CS Lewis. Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy, the main characters, step through the wardrobe and into the world of Narnia. This is a part of the series, the Chronicles of Narnia. Never stop dreaming. In The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 2), CS Lewis takes us out of our comfort zone and places us into the land of make believe.

The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien, a Book Review: This is another children’s book that teaches leadership lessons. In The Hobbit; or, There and Back Again, Bilbo starts out on the quest reluctantly with Gandalf and 13 dwarves Balin, Dwalin, Kili, Fili, Dori, Nori, Ori, Oin, Gloin, Bifur, Bofur, Bombur, Thorin Oakenshield, the chief dwarf. Bilbo doesn’t want to go on any adventures, because to him, that isn’t the way of hobbits. This is the hero’s journey and Bilbo is the unlikely and reluctant hero initially. He steps up to the challenge when he is forced to solve his own problems.

When Was the Last Time You Read a Children’s Book?: The book focuses on Geronimo Stilton, the editor of the Rodent’s Gazette, Geronimo’s sister Thea, a special correspondent at the Rodent’s Gazette, their cousin Trap Stilton, owner of the store Cheap Junk for Less, and Geronimo’s favourite nephew, nine year old Benjamin Stilton. Thea Stilton finds a treasure map where an X is marked at Emerald Eye. She convinces Geronimo to go with her on this treasure hunt. Geronimo, Thea and Trap embark on their treasure hunt sailing Lady Luck, and later on the journey find Benjamin who has stowed away on the ship. The story is about their preparation, the journey and the obstacles they encounter on the way. When you read the review of Geronimo Stilton #1: Lost Treasure of the Emerald Eye by Edizioni Piemme, you will learn some key life lessons to guide you.

Book Review: The Railway Children by E Nesbit: Though The Railway Children by E. Nesbit is a children’s book, it’s a perfect demonstration of why a safety net is so important. In the story, you have a father who is taken away, and we learn he is arrested for being a spy, which is a false accusation. The loss of income of the primary breadwinner forces the family into poverty. The Railway Children, a story of hope, teaches us that life is bigger than us and that the good we do comes back to us.

Charlotte’s Web by E B White, a Book Review: First published in 1952, Charlotte’s Web (Trophy Newbery) by E B White, also the author of Stuart Little, is a story about the cycle of life, love, friendship and loyalty Charlotte’s Web teaches us life lessons on relationships and how they work.

Aladdin and the Magic Lamp, a Book ReviewAladdin and the Magic Lamp is a timeless classic, old favorite that is worth the read. It teaches us not to give up on our dreams. Aladdin is given a magic lamp and he makes the most of it. Interestingly enough, there is a misconception that Aladdin had only three wishes, but in reality, he had as many wishes as he desired while in possession of the lamp. Although you may have read Aladdin and the Magic Lamp, it’s worth reading again and you can do so in less than an hour. If you ever get the opportunity, read the version of Aladdin and the Lamp that is in The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights (Modern Library Classics), translated by Sir Richard Burton. Read the post to learn more.

The Three Questions by Leo Tolstoy – Retold by Jon J Muth: I read The Three Questions [Based on a story by Leo Tolstoy] nearly a year ago and it made an impression on me. The Three Questions [Based on a story by Leo Tolstoy] is a short story written by Leo Tolstoy. When Nikolai, a young boy, arrives at Leo’s place, he asks the turtle his three questions. The three questions are important questions that adults should ask themselves: When is the best time to do things? Who is the most important one? And, What is the right thing to do? Jon J Muth recommends that you read the original The Three Questions by Leo Tolstoy, so I did, and I can say that he has done an excellent job of retelling the story. A big life lesson is living in the here and now – the importance of mindfulness.

Related Post

A Journey into Children’s Books

When was the last time you read a children’s book? Do you think there are life lessons from children’s books?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge – Take Your Blogging to the Next Level http://theinvisiblementor.com/sarah-arrows-30-day-blogging-challenge-take-your-blogging-to-the-next-level/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/sarah-arrows-30-day-blogging-challenge-take-your-blogging-to-the-next-level/#respond Wed, 25 Feb 2015 14:53:29 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17615 Take Your Blogging to the Next Level – You Can Do It! Have you ever felt a sense of accomplishment after completing a project that is important to you? I participated in Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge, and yesterday, I completed 30 consecutive days of blogging. I have blogged for 30 consecutive days before, but […]

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Take Your Blogging to the Next Level – You Can Do It!

Sarah Arrow's 30 Day Blogging Challenge

Take Your Blogging to the Next Level – You Can Do It!

Have you ever felt a sense of accomplishment after completing a project that is important to you? I participated in Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge, and yesterday, I completed 30 consecutive days of blogging. I have blogged for 30 consecutive days before, but what makes this different is the Challenge aspect. The first time I blogged for 30 days I had a reason for doing so, but this time around, I had a little help from a few friends, and it was like looking over the shoulders of an A-List blogger to see how she does things. In writing, you often learn that you should show and not tell. I am a visual person, so I like to see things. So for instance, the day of the Challenge where Sarah discusses calls to action, she not only talks about the importance of including a call to action on each blog post, but she also provides several concrete examples, and I found several that would work in the situation. I was able to take my blogging to the next level by participating in the Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge.

Related Content

Why I am participating in Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge (after blogging for nearly 6 years)

If you are a new blogger, or someone like myself who has blogged for a while, who wanted to learn about things she isn’t aware of, then Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge is for you.

So why join the challenge?

  1. The 30 Day Blogging Challenge is free. There were two instances where if you wanted more assistance, you could purchase a mini-course. The day that Sarah talked about writing an epic list post, she offered a course for £10, which I purchased because I thought that the topic was important enough for my situation to get the extra help. The second mini-course offered was about writing your About Page. In this instance, I didn’t purchase the mini-course. What I like is that there is no pressure to buy anything, but it was reassuring to know that if I needed some more help, it’s there for me.
  1. Each day you receive a prompt that requires you to take a specific action. I think this is a goldmine because all the actions are geared toward helping you to become a better blogger. And the best part is that the person who is giving the advice is qualified to do so. Sarah Arrow has been there, and we are learning from her experience. We get to look over her shoulder so she is showing us and not just telling us what to do.
  1. A community of friends to cheer you on to the finish line. Others in the community read and share your posts, providing valuable feedback. If you ask a blogging-related question in the Facebook group, people will share their perspective with you, so you will never feel alone. And it is quite assuring to know that you have supporters. There are bloggers at every stage of the 30 Day Challenge.
  1. The traffic to your blog increases because you are writing better blog posts as a result of applying the information you learn while participating in the challenge. You learn to mix things up, so for instance, you will learn to write different posts to engage your readers. I created my first infographic, and it wasn’t a breeze, but I stuck with it. Also, I wrote a curated content blog post, and this time I added video, which I had never done before. And on top of that, you get access to the tools and resources that Sarah uses – you will learn where to find images to complement your posts. I particularly liked the list of expert sources you can tap into to add credibility to a post. And on the first day of the challenge, you get a list of topic ideas that will keep you busy for a while. And as I mentioned before, there are many calls to action that you can use in each blog post to get readers to take action.
  1. If you save the email prompts like I did, and clipped the related blog posts to Evernote, you will be able to easily access them and keep on improving even after the end of the 30 Day Blogging Challenge.

It is worth noting that there were times when I acted on the challenge the day after, simply because by the time I got the email prompt, my post for that day was already live. This is not a negative because you have the information to use anytime going forward. Additionally, even if the post is live, depending on the prompt for that day, you can tweak your post. That happened with the prompt about call to action, I was able to beef up my published post. So why not take a chance and join Sarah Arrow’s 30 Day Blogging Challenge, you really have nothing to lose and so much to gain? I have blogged for close to six years, and I got a lot from participating in the challenge. Take your blogging to the next level – you can do it! I know you can.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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A New Way to Think about Reading Books http://theinvisiblementor.com/a-new-way-to-think-about-reading-books/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/a-new-way-to-think-about-reading-books/#respond Tue, 24 Feb 2015 11:15:46 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17609 A New Way to Think about Reading Books Nearly everyone these days is stretched for time, and time is one thing that none of us can get more of. You read the research about the benefits of reading books, and perhaps you have even taken a speed reading course or two. Yet, you cannot read […]

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A New Way to Think about Reading Books

reading booksNearly everyone these days is stretched for time, and time is one thing that none of us can get more of. You read the research about the benefits of reading books, and perhaps you have even taken a speed reading course or two. Yet, you cannot read as much as you would like to. When you were taught to read, you were taught to read word-by-word, from the start of the book to the end. Is it not interesting that you were never offered an advanced course in reading so that you could unlearn some of the rules of reading, and learn the new ones? When a child is first learning to read, there are certain concepts that he or she has to learn, but having mastered those concepts, they should have been replaced with new ones. Is there a new way to think about reading books?

You are probably one of those people who thinks that you have to read the entire book. But think about this for a second, why do you read a book in the first place? Mortimer Adler says that there are three reasons for reading a book – for entertainment, information or to further your knowledge. When reading for entertainment it makes sense to read the entire book because you do not want to miss information that’s critical to the plot. But when reading for information or to further knowledge, is it necessary to read the entire book to understand what the book is about? If you believe the 80/20 Rule, that means that if you read 20 percent of the book, you get 80 percent of the content, and is that enough for the time investment? What if the 80 percent of the book content covered by reading 20 percent gave you a sound understanding of what it is about, then could you say that you have read the book?

How to Save Hours of Time Reading a Book

It is a struggle for me to even think of a new way of reading a book. This is something that I mentioned once before on the blog. People ask me all the time if I read entire books and I say yes, because I do, but I have to admit that it’s time to change my way of reading books. My three words for this year are Learn, Invest and Connect so professional development is much bigger this year for me because I am more intentional about it. Although I read some books for entertainment, many of the books on my list are to get an education in an area that I am interested in. Embracing a new way to think about reading books will enable us to save hours in the time it takes us to read a book.

Related Post

My Three Words for 2015 – Learn, Invest and Connect 

Speed Reading: Collection of Articles to Help You Read Faster 

Do you make this mistake with your professional development? 

When it comes to reading books faster while reading well, I know what to do, but I do not always do it. One of the first things to do before reading a book is to skim and scan, and this is something that you learn in speed reading courses. This means that you look at the Table of Contents, read the first and last paragraphs of each chapter, read the book description and so on. When I do these things I read the book faster and shave hours off my reading time.

If I know this, why don’t I do it? 

Because it isn’t a habit. 

This year is the year when I rise to another level, and things are already moving in that direction because I am taking deliberate action. I have to get over the notion that I have to read the entire book to say that I have read it. Most books include the same information written in different ways, therefore if you already know the information, why read it over and over? There are books that have only a chapter that you need, so why read the entire book? I have to change my attitude toward what it means to read a book, and a shift in mindset is needed. I have piles of books that I have to get through this year, and I can only get through them if I embrace a new way to think about reading books.

The time for applying what I know to reading books the new way is now. I have to make the shift in mindset today, and not tomorrow. If I understand all the concepts in the book by reading 20 percent or even 50 percent, then I have read the book. Reading is very personal, and I should stop caring about what other people think, how about you? If you were more strategic in how you read books when reading for information or to further knowledge, imagine the number of books you would read each year!

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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