The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com Your ideal mentor is virtually in the palm of your hands Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:08:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/girl-with-a-pearl-earring-by-tracy-chevalier/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/girl-with-a-pearl-earring-by-tracy-chevalier/#respond Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:08:56 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16944 Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, Book Review Not much is known about the artist, Johannes Vermeer, so authors such as Tracy Chevalier and Susan Vreeland have re-imagined his life, based on extensive research on what life was like in Delft in the 1660s for someone in his position. They have presented their […]

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Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, Book Review

Not much is known about the artist, Johannes Vermeer, so authors such as Tracy Chevalier and Susan Vreeland have re-imagined his life, based on extensive research on what life was like in Delft in the 1660s for someone in his position. They have presented their findings in their respective novels, Girl With a Pearl Earring: A Novel, and Girl in Hyacinth Blue.

Related Post

Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland, Book Review

Girl With a Pearl Earring

Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier

Circumstances can change at the drop of a hat – the death of a spouse, the loss of a job, or even a change in relationship status. For the main character, 16-year-old Griet in Tracy Chevalier’s Girl With a Pearl Earring, her father loses his ability to work and support his family after a kiln explosion damages his eyes. Her younger brother Frans is working as an apprenticeship to become a tile maker, but she has to now support her family.

Griet’s family sinks further into poverty after the accident, and she has to work as a maid for Johannes Vermeer and his family. In Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, the reader sees how people are treated differently based on their class and vocation. Although Johannes Vermeer can barely support his ever-expanding family, when his “household helpers,” Tanneke or Griet purchases goods at the market or the apothecary for the family, they are allowed to put it on an account in his name. That’s one of the perks of class privilege.

Johannes Vermeer and his family live with Maria Thins, his mother-in-law, who is quite shrewd financially, and the one who negotiates the price for his paintings. Vermeer is poor because although he is an excellent painter, he produces only two works of art each year. Catharina, his wife, does not like Griet, because she is able to clean her husband’s studio, and she is not allowed to enter the room.

Although I sympathize with Griet because of the situation she is in, I find her to be much too pliable, and that may very well be a sign of the times. Vermeer has placed her into too many awkward situations and she seldom speaks up. For instance, he asks Griet to be his assistant because he discovers that she has an eye for art. He asks Griet to grind the bones to make paint, and he shows her how to do it. But he never tells Catharina that he is giving the maid extra duties to perform. As a result, Griet has to rise earlier and go to bed later to perform all her duties. She does it without complaining because she likes it much more than she likes being a maid.

Johannes Vermeer is an aloof character in Girl with a Pearl Earring, however, every so often, when he senses interest from Griet, he takes the time to explain what he is doing. He works with a sense of purpose, which wins him the maid’s approval. She hero worships him and ultimately falls in love with him, a situation that does not end well. Because Griet is such a keen student, she is able to recommend improvements to commissioned artwork. And she is also able to anticipate some of the changes Vermeer will make to improve his work.

Vermeer’s wealthy but lecherous patron, Van Ruijven, notices Griet’s innocence and beauty, and pressures the artist to paint him with the maid. But instead, Vermeer paints Griet alone. Maria Thins secretly takes her daughter’s pearl earrings for Griet to wear while being painted. The result is the now famous artwork Girl with a Pearl Earring, which has been in the collection of the Mauritshuis gallery in The Hague since 1902.

Catharina discovers the painting of Griet wearing her pearl earrings and is furious. Neither Vermeer nor Maria Thins come to her rescue. Griet has no choice but to leave her employer, and she does so leaving her belongings behind. She goes to young Pieter the butcher, who has proposed to her and the two marry. The reader doesn’t get the sense that Griet is in love with her husband, but she loves her two sons.

Girl With a Pearl Earring - Image Credit: Wikipedia

Girl With a Pearl Earring – Image Credit: Wikipedia

Ten years after leaving the employ of Johannes Vermeer, the artist dies young and in debt. The Vermeer family’s circumstances have altered and Catharina has to sell the paintings to settle debts. He wills the pearl earrings to Griet, who has to return to the house she left, one more time. But this time, she is a very different woman, one who is more confident and self-assured. She accepts the pearl earrings, but sells them shortly after, to pay off the debt that Vermeer owed her father-in-law. She receives 20 guilders for the earrings, hides five, which she will never use. Paying off Vermeer’s 15 guilder debt to her father-in-law gives Griet freedom because he always tells her that the 15 guilders is the price he and his son paid to get her.

Girl With a Pearl Earring: A Novel by Tracy Chevalier is a coming of age story. Griet narrates the story, which is told in the point of view of a young uneducated girl. The author tells the story using short sentences and simple vocabulary. In the book, the author makes a link between visual experience and self-consciousness. Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier is historical fiction at its finest, and the author is able to take readers back to the 17th century so that they can experience what life was like back then.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links

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Creating a Personal Library http://theinvisiblementor.com/creating-a-personal-library/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/creating-a-personal-library/#respond Wed, 29 Oct 2014 10:12:46 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16933 Creating a Personal Library How do you create a personal library? How do you decide which books to include? I have always loved to read, and I have gone through phases where all I read was one genre. But today, I would like to think that my reading is more diverse and deeper. I have […]

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Creating a Personal Library

How do you create a personal library? How do you decide which books to include?

Creating a Personal Library

Creating a Personal Library

I have always loved to read, and I have gone through phases where all I read was one genre. But today, I would like to think that my reading is more diverse and deeper. I have read many books that were entertaining, but not keepers, so I would get rid of them. I was never intentional about creating a personal library, and to be honest, I did not even think about it.

In the summer of 2007, Harriet Rubin wrote C.E.O. Libraries Reveal Keys to Success, an article for the New York Times, which made me start thinking more about personal libraries and their importance. Many people keep the information about their personal libraries a secret because when you think about it, the books you consume help to shape your mind and your thinking. I have paid very close attention to the kinds of books in personal libraries after I started working on the series on the personal libraries of successful people. And as I have mentioned before, what I have observed is that most successful and accomplished people read broadly and deeply.

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Jack Layton Personal Library
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Oscar Wilde Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Emily Dickinson Personal Library
Katharine Hepburn Personal Library
Frederick Douglass Personal Library
The Personal Library of George Washington
The Personal Library of Carl Sandburg
Why read, what to read, and Teddy Roosevelt

I have discovered some excellent books purely by accident. Years ago when Quality Paperback Book Club was in Canada, I joined, and for a long time, if you did not decline the month’s book choice, automatically received the book. Often I was so busy that I forgot to decline the book for the month, and since I had to pay for it, I decided to read it. Many times I would be pleasantly surprised. I have also discovered great books because authors who I liked referred or recommended them in their books.

Today, if I were just starting a personal library, I would approach things differently and be more strategic about it. From perusing the books in the personal libraries of successful people, I have noticed that the books reflect their personalities and interests, and they had varied interests. Their libraries included titles that enabled them to become better at their craft, and they often had several hobbies and areas of interest. To start the process of creating a personal library, ask yourself the following questions.

  • What are the best books that will enable you to grow and become more skilled in your professional life? That is, what books will allow you to become more valuable to yourself and your employer?
  • What are your hobbies?
  • What would you love to learn or know more about?
  • What things have always fascinated or entertained you? All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.

Over the past two years, as I pursued the Virtual Literary World Tour and  my informal liberal arts education, I have become very intentional about the books that I read, and I have discovered value in reading some of the classics. Going through lists of must-read books, have proven to be a gold mine for me and I recommend that you include some of these timeless classics in your personal library. Another important thing is to read from various disciplines which will allow you to be more creative when you are able to blend disciplines. If you are unsure of which books to choose to become better skilled at your craft, or other books to include  in your personal library, talk to librarians, your boss, friends and colleagues, asking them for book recommendations. Additionally, browse that section in libraries and bookstores to see which titles jump out at you and start making a list.

Although I think that it is important for you to find the right place to house your personal library, I think that it is more important to select the books for your library. Creating a personal library does not have to be an expensive undertaking if you buy books when they are on sale or visit used bookstores to find deals. Public libraries often have book sales where you can get books inexpensively. And start with purchasing only three books in each area of interest.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Global Reads: Travel the World http://theinvisiblementor.com/global-reads-travel-world/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/global-reads-travel-world/#respond Tue, 28 Oct 2014 10:12:33 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16938 Global Reads: Travel the World I cannot remember a time when I did not enjoy reading, how about you? But when I read, I read books that interest me and reading books by authors from countries other than those in the West was not at the top of my list until I embarked on my […]

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Global Reads: Travel the World

Global Reads

Global Reads: Travel the World

I cannot remember a time when I did not enjoy reading, how about you? But when I read, I read books that interest me and reading books by authors from countries other than those in the West was not at the top of my list until I embarked on my first Virtual Literary World Tour. For new readers of this blog, my mother died unexpectedly on October 3, 2012, and my heart was broken. To heal my heart, I decided it was important for me to do something that I love, which was reading. To add depth to my personal project, I decided to read books written by authors who were born in 30 different countries.

After successfully completing the Virtual Literary World Tour, I discovered the importance of reading globally. Looking back, I realized that I did not have the appropriate title for my reading project, and instead, I should have called it Global Reads: Travel the World. I traveled the world through the eyes of the authors, and the whole reading project was a culturally enriching experience. And now that I have done it once, I strongly recommend to others to read books by authors who are from faraway places. This is more critical today because we are living in a global village where the world is our stage. Because the whole notion of Global Reads: Travel the World is so important, I have incorporated it into my informal liberal arts education, and it will be the second Virtual Literary World Tour.

Recently, I have been learning the important lesson of keeping things simple. One of my great strengths lie in my capacity to consume and assimilate large amounts of data, and I often forget that not everyone is blessed with that skill. And because I read so much, I often forget that not everyone will be as excited about reading as much as I do. Reading gives me great pleasure, so I always make time to read, and I have the Kindle app on my Android phone so while I am waiting, I can read a book, and I usually have a book that I am reading in my purse.

Reading globally exposes you to new ideas because you are seeing things through new lenses. Since I have been intentionally reading “globally” for close to two years now, I will choose 12 books that you can start reading to keep things simple for you. And I will only include the books that I actually enjoyed, and most of the books are easy reading.

Global Reads: Travel the World

  1. Hunger: A Novel, Knut Hamsun, Norway
  2. Siddhartha, Hermann Hesse, Germany
  3.  Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Chögyam Trungpa, Tibet
  4. Out Stealing Horses: A Novel, Per Petterson, Norway
  5. The Coroner’s Lunch, Colin Cotterill, United Kingdom, Thailand
  6. A Man Lay Dead: Inspector Roderick Alleyn #1 (Inspector Roderick Alleyn), Ngaio Marsh, New Zealand
  7. The Laughing Policeman (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard), Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo, Sweden
  8. Silence of the Grave (Reykjavik Murder Mysteries, No. 2), Arnaldur Indriðason, Iceland
  9. Love in the Time of Cholera (Oprah’s Book Club), Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia
  10. Season of Migration to the North, Tayeb Salih
  11. Zorba the Greek, Nikos Kazantzakis (Had some issues with the way women are portrayed)
  12. Beowulf
  13. All Quiet on the Western Front: A Novel, Erich Maria Remarque

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Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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When Was the Last Time You Took Your Reading Up a Notch? http://theinvisiblementor.com/when-was-the-last-time-you-took-you-reading-up-a-notch/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/when-was-the-last-time-you-took-you-reading-up-a-notch/#respond Fri, 24 Oct 2014 10:12:43 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16927 When Was the Last Time You Took Your Reading Up a Notch? I read broadly, and I read books of varying levels of difficulty. As part of my informal liberal arts education, I am reading the classics. A few days ago, it occurred to me that the books I am reading should be global because […]

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When Was the Last Time You Took Your Reading Up a Notch?

Scarpetta and VI Warshawski

When Was the Last Time You Took Your Reading Up a Notch?

I read broadly, and I read books of varying levels of difficulty. As part of my informal liberal arts education, I am reading the classics. A few days ago, it occurred to me that the books I am reading should be global because we are living in a global world. Over the past three days, I have been creating my 30-60-90 Day Plan, and I have been intentional about the books that I intend to read during the next three months, making sure that not only the books are diverse by their subject matter, but diverse in terms of where the authors were born. Because reading the classics is often an excursion into the world of deep thought, to make sure that I stick to my goal, I am also reading books I love such as chick lit, detective stories and murder mysteries. How do you decide which books to read, and how do you make sure that you are always taking your reading up a notch?

Over the past few months, Indigo Gifts and Music, a chain similar to Barnes and Noble, has been featuring two for $15 on selected mass paperbacks. A couple of weeks ago, I noticed Patricia Cornwell’s Dust, a Scarpetta Novel, and Sara Paretsky’s Critical Mass, a VI Warshawski Novel, so I purchased them. I have been reading both series since 1995, but a few years ago. I realized that I no longer enjoyed the books because I was finding them too predictable. When an author has been writing a series for such a long time, it is very difficult to keep things fresh, and I lift up my hat to them. I had made a promise to myself that I would stop reading all the series that I had been reading since 1995, and there are four of them. I broke that commitment when I purchased Dust (A Scarpetta Novel) and Critical Mass: A V.I. Warshawski Novel. I read Dust in no time and I have yet to begin Critical Mass. I did not enjoy Dust and it has nothing to do with Patricia Cornwell’s writing because she writes very well. And I will go as far as to say that I am sure that people who love murder mysteries, and have not been reading the series for as long as I have, would love the book.

So why did I choose to buy the books? Because they are comfortable and I know the characters very well. They are like old friends who I know what to expect from. I have become complacent. Yes, I am reading some difficult to understand books as a part of my informal liberal arts education, but I think that when I am reading for pleasure, I also need to step it up a notch. Am I being too difficult on myself? Recently, I read, summarized and enjoyed Daphne du Maurier’s Jamaica Inn, which is a mystery and romance story, but while I was reading the book, which is set in Cornwall in the 1830s, I was also thinking about modern day technologies that would enhance the story.

What I have to do now is to let go of my old friends Kay Scarpetta and VI Warshawski, and embrace some new friends as I go on a new journey. when was the last time you took your reading up a notch? Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/jamaica-inn-daphne-du-maurier-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/jamaica-inn-daphne-du-maurier-book-review/#respond Tue, 21 Oct 2014 15:13:28 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16921 Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier, Book Review Published in 1936, Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier is a romance novel steeped in suspense and murder, with a theme that deals with identity. In How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines, Thomas C. Foster describes […]

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Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier, Book Review

Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier, Book Review

Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier, Book Review

Published in 1936, Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier is a romance novel steeped in suspense and murder, with a theme that deals with identity. In How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines, Thomas C. Foster describes the importance of story starters, the weather, the names of characters and so on, and the role they play in the story. In Jamaica Inn, the setting, which is Gothic, is integral to the story, keeps the readers in suspense. If you have been reading The Invisible Mentor blog for a while, you have been introduced to the author, Daphne du Maurier, in my review of her book, Rebecca.

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Book Review – Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

Book Review – How to Read Literature Like a Professor by Thomas C. Foster

“It was a cold and grey day in late November. The weather had changed overnight, when a backing wind brought a granite sky and a mizzling rain with it, and although it was now only a little after two o’clock in the afternoon the pallor of a winter evening seemed to have closed upon the hills, cloaking them in the mist. It would be dark by four. The air was clammy cold, and for all the tightly closed windows it penetrated the interior of the coach.”

The way the novel, Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier begins, the reader has a sense of foreboding. Mary Yellan’s mother is dying and her heart is about to give out. Mary’s mother makes her promise that when she dies, she wants her daughter to go to Bodmin to live with her free-spirited, sister, Aunt Patience and her husband. But Mary Yellan does not want to leave her hometown, Helford because she thinks she is quite capable of taking care of herself and can make a success of farming. Set in 1835 in Cornwall, that is not the role of women in society, however, Mary Yellan feels that society with its archaic laws and expectations concerning the role of women is cheating her out of the life that she deems best for herself at the age of 23. She also believes that conventional marriage will constrain her.

Knowing her daughter very well, Mary Yellan’s mother makes her promise that she will go to her aunt. After her mother dies, Mary makes the journey to her Aunt Patience and uncle Joss Merlyn. While on the journey Mary learns that people do not think very highly of her Uncle Joss, and in fact, he is despised by his neighbors. When Mary arrives, she is shocked to see her Aunt Patience, who is a shell of her former self. Instead of a fun-loving woman, she is a timid, dispirited woman, broken by the abuse of her husband.

Uncle Joss warns Mary not to look outside at nights when she hears sounds, but she does anyway and discovers a smuggling ring. Her uncle is a smuggler and possibly a murderer. She also discovers, that there is another person, who is secretly working with Joss that the others in the smuggling ring do not know about. While Joss is away, one day, Mr Bassat, a magistrate raids Jamaica Inn, but finds no evidence of smuggling or other wrongdoing because the evidence had been removed the night before. He asks Mary a lot of questions, but to protect her aunt, who behaves like a child, she tells Mr Bassat lies. When Joss returns home, he is furious to learn what Mr Bassat has done, but Mary can also see the fear in his eyes. Joss leaves on foot, and Mary decides to follow him through the moors.

She loses her way, and Francis Davey, the Vicar of Altarnum, who happens to be an albino rescues her. Many people are uncomfortable around albinos, and people may even hate and discriminate against them because of the way they look. Du Maurier uses the way the vicar looks as a focus for what we do not like, in Jamaica Inn. The vicar takes her to the vicarage, feeds her, and allows her to rest before he gives her a ride home. Because Francis Davey is a man of God, Mary’s lips are loose, and she tells him all that has been going on at the inn since she has been living there. When she arrives home, she is nervous, and not quite sure how she will get inside without her uncle knowing that she has been away. The vicar says he will take a look, and discovers that Joss Merlyn has been drinking heavily. Mary is able to enter without her uncle being aware of her.

Mary Yellan feels very isolated, and the isolation is also a part of the location of Jamaica Inn, which is isolated in the bleak moorlands of Cornwall, so the setting is critical to the story line because the Inn is the center of the operation of the smuggling ring. It is difficult for Mary to make friends with any of the closest neighbors, who shun the Merlyns, and she is guilty by association. She is attracted to Jem Merlyn, Joss’ brother and a horse thief. Because of what she has seen of her Uncle Joss, she doesn’t trust Jem because she thinks that he has to be like his brother. The author is using Joss and Jem to express different aspects of the same personality. Joss is an alcoholic, and during his binges, he has very loose lips and talks about all the bad things he has done. During one of those times, he tells Mary of some of the horrific crimes he has committed, and the innocent people he has killed. Mary learns about wreckers, criminals who force ships to become shipwrecked so that they can steal the goods, kill and rob the passengers.

After she hears the tales from Joss, the light leaves her eyes and she starts to become a shell of her former self. Mary now understands exactly what has happened to her Aunt Patience. Mary travels with Jem to Launceston on Christmas Eve so that he can sell the horses that he steals. She doesn’t agree with what Jem is doing, but it is a way for her to get away, even if it’s only for a short time. Before they return home in the evening, Jem leaves to get the horses and doesn’t return to get Mary, so she has to walk the many miles to get home. Once again, the vicar rescues her.

Francis Davey leaves Mary in the coach at a certain spot, and when she arrives at Jamaica Inn, the coach is held up by the smugglers and the coachman is shot and killed. Joss discovers that it’s Mary in the coach, and he physically abuses her. That night she gets front seat to see the smugglers wrecking a ship, killing innocent people and taking their possessions. The gang of wreckers, which includes her Uncle Joss, cause the ship to founder on the rocks on the coast of Cornwall by setting false lights during the storm. In this instance, the crime is not very well planned and before they can take away all the goods, dawn is breaking. There is mayhem and the criminals start to kill each other. There are times when Mary tries to assist the innocent, and she is once again physically abused. Mary often acts impulsively, her actions are not very well thought out, so she is ineffective.

In the end, her Aunt Patience and Uncle Joss are murdered while she is out trying to get help for herself and her aunt. Nearly all the smugglers are killed. Even after the death of Joss Merlyn, when the people are more accepting of Mary Yellan, she still feels isolated and like she doesn’t belong. She doesn’t love the people because they are not her people. She patches up things with Jem and heads off with him. Jamaica Inn is a love story, but it is filled with a lot of suspense and intrigue. If readers are paying attention, they will be able to figure out who is the real mastermind behind the smuggling ring, and the person who kills Joss and Aunt Patience.

Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier will give you another opportunity to test your problem solving skills. Although the story is romance and murder mystery, the author uses a Gothic setting to unfold the story. Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Jack Layton Personal Library http://theinvisiblementor.com/jack-layton-personal-library/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/jack-layton-personal-library/#respond Mon, 20 Oct 2014 10:12:48 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16907 Jack Layton Personal Library Jack Layton was a Canadian social democratic politician who led the New Democrat Party – 2003-2011 – from 13 Members of Parliament to 103. Born on July 18, 1950, Layton died on August 22, 2011 after suffering from cancer. As can be expected, there were many political books in his personal […]

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Jack Layton Personal Library

Jack Layton

Jack Layton Personal Library – Image Credit: Canadian Encyclopedia

Jack Layton was a Canadian social democratic politician who led the New Democrat Party – 2003-2011 – from 13 Members of Parliament to 103. Born on July 18, 1950, Layton died on August 22, 2011 after suffering from cancer. As can be expected, there were many political books in his personal library, which was not as diverse as many of the other successful people whom we have featured. Jack Layton was highly educated, “graduated in political science from McGill University with a BA (1970) and from York University with an MA (1971) and a PhD (1984). His PhD thesis dealt with globalization.” Canadian Encyclopedia 

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Why read, what to read, and Teddy Roosevelt
The 430 Books in Marilyn Monroe’s Library: How Many Have You Read?

I used a random number generator to select 77 books from the 1,166 books that were in his personal library. Because there were so many political books in his library, I opted to replace some of the randomly selected titles because I would not read some of those books, and I  am assuming that my readers would not want to read some of them as well. In the event that I made an incorrect decision, not to worry, the link to Library Thing below, will take you directly to Jack Layton’s personal library, and you can browse the selection of books. This installment in the series of the personal libraries of successful people was made possible by Library Thing. How many of the books on the list below have you read?

77 Books from Jack Layton’s Personal Library (Randomly selected) 

  1. And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic, 20th-Anniversary Edition, Randy Shilts
  2. Blaming the Victim, William Ryan
  3. Unacceptable Risk: The Nuclear Power Controversy, McKinley C. Olson
  4. Cicero: De re Publica (On the Republic) , De Legibus (On the Laws) (Loeb Classical Library No. 213), De Legibus Cicero
  5. Hurricane: The Miraculous Journey of Rubin Carter, James S. Hirsch
  6. Class Struggle In Africa, Kwame Nkrumah
  7. Rising Prices: Why Inflation Hasn’t Been Licked, H. Lukin Robinson
  8. History of the Idea of Progress, Robert Nisbet
  9. Karl Marx, Frederick Engels: Marx and Engels Collected Works 1864-68 (Karl Marx, Frederick Engels: Collected Works), Karl Marx
  10. The Sea-beach at Ebb-tide: A Guide to the Study of the Seaweeds and the Lower Animal Life Found Between Tide-Marks, Augusta Arnold
  11. Hegel, Charles Taylor
  12. The Rights of Man (Rights of Man, Common Sense, and Other Political Writings (Oxford World’s Classics)), Thomas Paine
  13. A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy, Karl Marx
  14. Lehrbuch Der Neuhebraischen Sprache Und Litteratur (German Edition), H L and Siegfried Strack, C
  15. Race Against Time (CBC Massey Lectures Series), Stephen Lewis
  16. State Of Earth Atlas, Joni Seager
  17. Winnipeg 1919: the strikers’ own history of the Winnipeg general strike, Winnipeg Defence Committee
  18. Cold War Blues: The Operation Dismantle Story, T. James Stark
  19. Becoming An Ally: Breaking the Cycle of Oppression
  20. Global Warming: Greenpeace Report, Jeremy Leggett
  21. Tragic Deception: Marx Contra Engels (Twentieth century series; 8), Norman Levine
  22. Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development (3rd Edition), Craig Larman
  23. Beyond Labeling: The Role of Maternal Input in the Acquisition of Richly Structured Categories (Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development), Susan Gelman
  24. Fidel: A Critical Portrait, Tad Szulc
  25. Keeping Our Cool: Canada in a Warming World, Andrew Weaver
  26. Utopia (Penguin Classics), Thomas More
  27. Medical Nemesis: The Expropriation of Health (Open Forum), Ivan Illich
  28. Jack Layton

    Jack Layton

    The Nature of Economies (Modern Library), Jane Jacobs

  29. Uncle Sam and Us: Globalization, Neoconservatism, and the Canadian State, Stephen Clarkson
  30. The Economics of Innocent Fraud: Truth For Our Time, John Kenneth Galbraith
  31. The Myth of the Good Corporate Citizen: Canada and Democracy in the Age of Globalization, Murray Dobbin
  32. Here’s Looking at Us: Celebrating 50 Years of CBC TV, Stephen Cole
  33. Nisga’A: People of the Nass
  34. An Open Letter to the Party [A Revolutionary Socialist Manifesto], Jacek Kuron, and Modzelewski, Karol, and Harman, Chris
  35. Breaking faith: The Mulroney legacy of deceit, destruction, and disunity, Brooke Jeffrey
  36. Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend, Robert James Waller
  37. Toward a Marxist Theory of Nationalism, Horace B. Davis
  38. Building Cities That Work, Edmund P. Fowler
  39. The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison
  40. Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery
  41. Passion for Action in Child and Family Services: Voices from the Prairies (University of Regina Publications(UR)), Don Fuchs
  42. Canadians at work, Vincenzo Pietropaolo
  43. A Lasting Peace: Collected Addresses of Daisaku Ikeda, Daisaku Ikeda
  44. Daughter of Fortune: A Novel, Isabel Allende
  45. Towers of Deception: The Media Cover-up of 9/11, Barrie Zwicker
  46. Contracting Masculinity: Gender, Class, and Race in a White-Collar Union, 1944-1994 (Canadian Social History Series), Gillian Creese
  47. Bleeding Afghanistan: Washington, Warlords, and the Propaganda of Silence, Sonali Kolhatkar
  48. Global Warming: Are We Entering the Greenhouse Century?, Stephen H. Schneider
  49. Globalization and Its Discontents (Norton Paperback), Joseph E. Stiglitz
  50. The No-Nonsense Guide to Class, Caste & Hierarchies (No Nonsense Guides (Verso)), Jeremy Seabrook
  51. The Sound of Trumpets (Rapstone Chronicles), John Mortime
  52. Whose Trade Organization?: The Comprehensive Guide to the WTO, Lori Wallach
  53. Walking Home: The Life and Lessons of a City Builder, Ken Greenberg
  54. Paper Doll: Lessons Learned from a Life Lived in the Headlines, Luan Mitchell
  55. Ragged Chain: A Sumach Mystery, Vivian Meyer
  56. In My Own Name, Maureen McTeer
  57. The Turning Point: Science, Society, and the Rising Culture, Fritjof Capra
  58. Finding Carrie George, Frank LaRue
  59. Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us, Seth Godin
  60. The Natural Step for Business: Wealth, Ecology & the Evolutionary Corporation (Conscientious Commerce), Brian Nattrass
  61. The Cult of Efficiency (CBC Massey Lecutres Series), Janice Stein
  62. The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, Malcolm Gladwell
  63. Walden, Henry David Thoreau
  64. Quotations From Chairman Mao Tse-Tung, Mao Tse-Tung
  65. 30 Days to a More Powerful Vocabulary, Wilfred & Lewis Funk, Norman
  66. The Pilgrim’s Progress, John Bunyan
  67. The Poems of John Keats, John Keats
  68. Biopolitics, Thomas Landon Thorso
  69. Gorgias, Plato
  70. Necessity of Social Control, I. Meszaros
  71. Social Contract: Essays by Locke, Hume, and Rousseau, Hume Locke, Rousseau
  72. Search for a Method, Jean-Paul Sartre
  73. Between Past and Future (Penguin Classics), Hannah Arendt
  74. The Myth of Sisyphus: And Other Essays, Albert Camus
  75. An outline of basic political theory, Charles Preston
  76. Kant: Great books of the western world; 42. The critique of pure reason; The critique of practical reason and other ethical treatises; The critique of judgement. (Great Books of the Western World, 42), Robert M. Hutchins, Kant
  77. Ethics, G.E. Moore

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Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

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Kevin Spacey: 3 Elements of Storytelling http://theinvisiblementor.com/3-elements-of-storytelling-kevin-spacey/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/3-elements-of-storytelling-kevin-spacey/#respond Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:23:14 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16893 Kevin Spacey: 3 Elements of Storytelling Don’t you just love it when you find useful content? While scanning my ContentGems Daily Summary, I noticed “Kevin Spacey Closing Keynote Highlights,” so I decided to click on the link because I thought that the actor, Kevin Spacey should know about storytelling. In the five-and-a-half minute video, the […]

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Kevin Spacey: 3 Elements of Storytelling

Elements of Storytelling

Kevin Spacey: 3 Elements of Storytelling

Don’t you just love it when you find useful content? While scanning my ContentGems Daily Summary, I noticed “Kevin Spacey Closing Keynote Highlights,” so I decided to click on the link because I thought that the actor, Kevin Spacey should know about storytelling. In the five-and-a-half minute video, the famed actor talks about the 3 elements of storytelling, as well as a few other tips. I think that the ability to tell engaging stories will enable us to write better articles and blog posts that captivate our readers. Effective storytelling is a skill that I am developing, but I am not close to mastering the skill yet.

When Content Marketing Institute founder, Joe Pulizzi asked Spacey for some final storytelling nuggets for conference attendees to take back to work,  the actor replied:

  • Give it to them, which means to give your readers what they want, what they are craving.
  • Get your mind to work at expressing yourself, clearly articulating what you want your readers to know.
  • Ask yourself, “What story you would like to tell?”
  • Begin simply.
  • Build the blocks you need to tell your story.
  • Decide on the most compelling way to tell your story.
  • Your story is only as good as the material that you are working with.

Related Posts:

The Power of Visual Storytelling by Ekaterina Walter and Jessica Gioglio – Book Review
Relevance: One of the Keys to Successful Social Interactions

Kevin Spacey Closing Keynote Highlights – Content Marketing World 2014

If you cannot view the video, click here!

3 Elements of Storytelling

  1. The story is everything, and a good story has CONFLICT because it keeps your readers engaged. The story becomes richer when you go against the settled order of things, the status quo.
  2. AUTHENTICITY is key in storytelling. Stay true to your brand and your unique voice because your audience will respond with enthusiasm and passion.
  3. Your AUDIENCE is the third element of storytelling. It is no longer about who you know, it is about what you can do. The device you use and the length of your story are irrelevant.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Marilyn Monroe Personal Library http://theinvisiblementor.com/marilyn-monroe-personal-library/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/marilyn-monroe-personal-library/#respond Thu, 16 Oct 2014 10:12:19 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16869 Marilyn Monroe Personal Library When you think of Marilyn Monroe, the photo of her wearing a sexy, white dress blowing in the air often comes to mind. And she isn’t the dumb blond that many may think she is. In fact, Marilyn Monroe was well read and had over 400 books in her personal library […]

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Marilyn Monroe Personal Library

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe Personal Library – Image Credit: Open Culture

When you think of Marilyn Monroe, the photo of her wearing a sexy, white dress blowing in the air often comes to mind. And she isn’t the dumb blond that many may think she is. In fact, Marilyn Monroe was well read and had over 400 books in her personal library from various genres – American literature, French literature, Russian literature, poetry, plays, art, music, science, biographies, gardening and pets, humor, politics, religion, psychology, reference, travel and much more. It is true that she may not have read all the books on her bookshelf – think of the many unread books in your personal library – but I suspect that she read many of them. Like the other successful people, who we have profiled in the series, Marilyn Monroe read broadly and read books that often made her think.

I read the background on Marilyn Monroe to write this introduction, and I struggled with what to include because although several of her films were successes, she led a troubled life, and was unable to sustain relationships. In the end, I decided that I did not want to comment because there is so much already written about her, which readers can easily access. What can I say that you have not already heard? What I do want to say is that if you chose 52 books from her personal library, from a variety of genres, you will start the process to shaping a successful mind. The quality of the books that you read is an important element in the success formula.

This post was made possible because of The 430 Books in Marilyn Monroe’s Library: How Many Have You Read?, a post on Open Culture.

Related Posts

CS Lewis Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Oscar Wilde Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Emily Dickinson Personal Library
Katharine Hepburn Personal Library
Frederick Douglass Personal Library
The Personal Library of George Washington
The Personal Library of Carl Sandburg
Why read, what to read, and Teddy Roosevelt
The 430 Books in Marilyn Monroe’s Library: How Many Have You Read?

Books in Marilyn Monroe’s Personal Library

  1. Let’s Make Love by Matthew Andrews
  2. How to Travel Incognito by Ludwig Bemelmans
  3. To the One I Love Best by Ludwig Bemelmans
  4. Thurber Country: A Collection of Pieces About Males and Females, Mainly of Our Species by James Thurber
  5. The Fall by Albert Camus
  6. Marilyn Monroe Her Own Story by George Carpozi
  7. Camille by Alexander Dumas
  8. Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
  9. 1896 Boston Cooking-School Cookbook by Fannie Merritt-Farmer
  10. The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald
  11. From Russia with Love (James Bond) by Ian Fleming
  12. The Art of Loving by Erich Fromm
  13. The Prophet by Kahlil Gilbran
  14. Ulysses by James Joyce
  15. Stoned Like a Statue a Complete Survey of Drinking Cliches Primitive, Classical and Modern by Howard Kandel & Don Safran
  16. The Last Temptation of Christ by Nikos Kazantzakis
  17. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
  18. Selected Poems (Penguin Classics) by DH Lawrence
  19. Sons and Lovers (Dover Thrift Editions) by DH Lawrence
  20. The Portable D. H. Lawrence (Viking Portable Library) DH Lawrence
  21. Etruscan Places: Travels Through Forgotten Italy (Tauris Parke Paperbacks) by DH Lawrence
  22. D. H. Lawrence: A Basic Study Of His Ideas by Mary Freeman
  23. The Assistant: A Novel by Bernard Malamud
  24. The Magic Barrel: Stories by Bernard Malamud
  25. Death in Venice: And Seven Other Stories by Thomas Mann
  26. Last Essays by Thomas Mann
  27. The Thomas Mann Reader
  28. Hawaii by James Michener
  29. Red Roses for Me (Sean O’Casey: Plays 1: Juno and the Paycock, Within the Gates; Red Roses; Cock-a-Doodle Dandy (Contemporary Classics (Faber & Faber)) (Vol 1)) by Sean O’Casey
  30. I Knock At the Door (Autobiography, Vol. 1: I Knock at the Door) by Sean O’Casey
  31. Selected plays of Sean O’Casey by Sean O’Casey
  32. The Green Crows by Sean O’Casey
  33. Golden Boy: Acting Edition by Clifford Odets
  34. Clash By Night by Clifford Odets
  35. The Country Girl by Clifford Odets
  36. Six Plays of Clifford Odets
  37. The Cat with Two Faces:The Most Amazing Spy Story of the Second World War (Mathiby Gordon Young
  38.  Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill
  39. Part Of A Long Story: Eugene O’Neill As A Young Man In Love by Agnes Boulton
  40. The Little Engine That Could (Little Letters Edition) by Piper Watty
  41. Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer & Marion Rombauer-Becker
  42. George Bernard Shaw: Selected Plays
  43. Ellen Terry & Bernard Shaw: A Correspondence
  44. Bernard Shaw & Mrs. Patrick Campbell: Their Correspondence
  45. The Short Reigh of Pippin IV Hilarious and Affectionate Spoof.by John Steinbeck
  46. Once There Was a War (Penguin Classics) by John Steinbeck
  47. Set This House on Fire by William Styron
  48. Lie Down in Darkness William Styron
  49. The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone by Tennessee Williams
  50. Camino Real (New Directions Paperbook) by Tennessee Williams
  51. A Streetcar Named Desire (New Directions Paperbook) by Tennessee Williams (with notes by MM)
  52. The Flower in Drama & Glamour: Theatre essays and criticism by Stark Young
  53. Tender Is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  54. The Story of a Novel by Thomas Wolfe
  55. Look Homeward, Angel by Thomas Wolfe
  56. A Stone, A Leaf, A Door, Thomas Wolfe
  57. Thomas Wolfe’s letters to his mother, Julia Elizabeth Wolfe,, ed. John Skally Terry
  58. A Farewell To Arms by Ernest Hemingway
  59. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
  60. Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson
  61. Sister Carrie (Dover Thrift Editions) by Theodore Dreiser
  62. Tortilla Flat (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics) by John Steinbeck
  63. The American Claimant, and Other Stories and Sketches by Mark Twain
  64. In Defense of Harriet Shelley: And Other Essays (Mark Twain?)
  65. Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  66. Roughing It (Signet Classics) by Mark Twain
  67. The Magic Christian by Terry Southern
  68. A Death in the Family (Penguin Classics) by James Agee
  69. The War Lover by John Hersey
  70. Don’t call me by my right name: And other stories by James Purdy
  71. Malcolm by James Purdy
  72. The Portable Irish Reader
  73. The Portable Edgar Allan Poe (Penguin Classics)
  74. The Portable Walt Whitman (Penguin Classics)
  75. Short Novels of Colette
  76. Short Story Masterpieces (New York, 1960)
  77. The Passionate Playgoer: A Personal Scrapbook by George Oppenheimer
  78. Fancies and Goodnights (New York Review Books) by John Collier
  79. Evergreen Review, Vol. 2, No. 6
  80. The Medals and Other Stories by Luigi Pirandello
  81. Renoir by Albert Skira
  82. Max by Giovannetti Pericle
  83. THE FAMILY OF MAN : The greatest photographic exhibition of all time- 503 pictures from 68 countries- created by Edward Steichen for The Museum of Modern Art by Carl Sandburg
  84. Horizon, a Magazine of the Arts (Horizon – A Magazine of the Arts : January 1959 : Volume I, Number 3)
  85. Jean Dubuffet (The drawings of Jean Dubuffet) by Daniel Cordier
  86. Summing Up by W. Somerset Maugham
  87. Close to Colette: An Intimate Portrait of a Woman of Genius (Illustrated) by Maurice Goudeket
  88. This Demi-Paradise by Margaret Halsey
  89. God Protect Me from My Friends by Gavin Maxwell
  90. Minister of death: the Adolf Eichmann story by Quentin Reynolds, Ephraim Katz and Zwy Aldouby
  91. Dance to the Piper by Agnes DeMille
  92. Goodness had nothing to do with it: The Autobiography of Mae West by Mae West
  93. Act One: An Autobiography by Moss Hart
  94. Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (Authorized, Study Edition) by Mary Baker Eddy
  95. Poems Including Christ and Christmas by Mary Baker Eddy
  96. Two plays: Peace and Lysistrata by Aristophanes
  97. On the Nature of Things by Lucretius
  98. Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes by Edith Hamilton
  99. Theory of Poetry and Fine Art (Aristotle’s Theory of Poetry and Fine Art: With a Critical Text and Translation of the Poetics (Classic Reprint)) by Aristotle
  100. The Metaphysics (Penguin Classics) by Aristotle
  101. Bound for Glory (Plume) by Woody Guthrie
  102. Paris Blues by Harold Flender
  103. The Shook-Up Generationby Harrison E. Salisbury
  104. Independent People by Halldor Laxness
  105. The Havamal, (The Havamal – Sayings of the High One) ed. D.E. Martin Clarke
  106. Yuan Mei, Eighteenth Century Chinese Poet. by Arthur Waley
  107. Madame Bovary (Bantam Classics) by Gustave Flaubert
  108. The Works of Rabelais
  109. The Guermantes Way by Marcel Proust
  110. Cities of the Plain (Remembrance of Things Past , Part Five) by Marcel Proust
  111. Within a Budding Grove by Marcel Proust
  112. The Sweet Cheat Gone: An autobiography [The Modern Library] by Marcel Proust
  113. The Captive & The Fugitive: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. V (Modern Library Classics) (v. 5) by Marcel Proust
  114. Nana (Penguin Classics) by Emile Zola
  115. Plays (Moliere Five Plays: “The School for Wives”, “Tartuffe”, “The Misanthrope”, “The Miser”, “The Hypochondriac” (World Classics)) by Moliere
  116. Life and Work of Sigmund Freud by Ernest Jones
  117. Letters of Sigmund Freud, ed. Ernest L. Freud
  118. Glory Reflected: Sigmund Freud-Man and Father By His Eldest Son by Martin Freud
  119. Moses and Monotheism by Sigmund Freud
  120. Conditioned Reflex Therapy by Andrew Salter
  121. The Wise Garden Encyclopedia, ed. E.L.D. Seymour
  122. Landscaping your Own Home by Alice Dustan
  123. The Forest and The Sea: A Look at the Economy of Nature and the Ecology of Man (Time Reading Program Special Edition) by Marston Bates
  124. Pet turtles by Julien Bronson
  125. A Book About Bees by Edwin Way Teale
  126. Marilyn Monroe

    Marilyn Monroe Personal Library – Image Credit: Open Culture

    Codfish, Cats and Civilization by Gary Webster

  127.  How To Do It: Or The Lively Art Of Entertaining by Elsa Maxwell
  128. Wake Up, Stupid by Mark Harris
  129. Merry Christmas, Happy New Year by Phyllis McGinley
  130. THE HERO MAKER a Far-out Book by Akbar Del Piombo and Norman Rubington
  131. How To Talk at Gin by Ernie Kovacs
  132. Vip Tosses a Party 1ST Edition, by Virgil Partch
  133. Who Blowed Up the Church House? And Other Ozark Folk Tales ed. Randolph Vance
  134. Snobs: The Classic Guidebook to Your Friends, Your Enemies, Your Colleagues, and Yourself by Russell Lynes
  135. Holy Scriptures According to the Masoretic Text
  136. The Law by Roger Vailland
  137. The Mermaids by Boros
  138. They Came To Cordura by Glendon Swarthout
  139. The Seventh Cross by Anna Seghers
  140. A European Education by Romain Gary
  141. Strike for a Kingdom (Honno’s Welsh Women’s Classics) by Menna Gallie
  142. The Slide Area (Midnight Classics) by Gavin Lambert
  143. The woman who was poor,: A contemporary novel of the French ‘eighties, by Leon Bloy
  144. Green Mansions: A Romance of the Tropical Forest by W.H. Hudson
  145. The Contenders by John Wain
  146. The Best of All Worlds or What Voltaire Never Knew by Hans Jorgen Lembourn
  147. The Story Of Esther Costello by Nicholas Montsarrat
  148. Oh Careless Love by Maurice Zolotow (MM biographer)
  149. Add a Dash of Pity by Peter Ustinov
  150. An American Tragedy (Signet Classics) by Theodore Dreiser
  151. The Mark of the Warrior by Paul Scott
  152. The Dancing Bear by Edzard Schaper
  153. A Miracle in the Rain by Ben Hecht
  154. The Guide: A Novel (Penguin Classics) by R.K. Narayan
  155. Blow up a storm by Garson Kanin
  156. Fowlers End by Gerald Kersh
  157. Hurricane season by Ralph Winnett
  158. The Devil’s Advocate (Loyola Classics) by Morris L. West
  159. ON SUCH A NIGHT by Anthony Quayle
  160. Say You Never Saw Me by Arthur Nesbitt
  161. All the Naked Heroes by Alan Kapelner
  162. Jeremy Todd by Hamilton Maule
  163. Miss America by Daniel Stern
  164. A fever in the blood by William Pearson
  165. Spartacus (North Castle Books) by Howard Fast
  166. Cup of Tea for Mr. Thorgill by Storm Jameson
  167. Six O’clock Casual by Henry W. Cune
  168. Mischief by Charlotte Armstrong
  169. The Ginkgo Tree by Sheelagh Burns
  170. The Mountain Road by Theodore H. White
  171. Three Circles of Light by Pietro Di Donato
  172. The Day the Money Stopped by Brendan Gill
  173. The Carpetbaggers by Harold Robbins (
  174. Justine (Alexandria) by Lawrence Durrell
  175. Balthazar (Alexandria Quartet) by Lawrence Durrell
  176. Brighton Rock (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Graham Greene
  177. The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale by Joseph Conrad
  178. Unnamable by Samuel Beckett
  179. Dylan Thomas: Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Dog by Dylan Thomas (
  180. Hear Us O Lord from Heaven Thy Dwelling Place (Milestones in Canadian Literature), by Malcolm Lowry
  181. The Sound and the Fury/As I Lay Dying (A Summer of Faulkner: As I Lay Dying/The Sound and the Fury/Light in August (Oprah’s Book Club)), by William Faulkner
  182. God’s Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell
  183. Three Great Plays: The Emperor Jones, Anna Christie and The Hairy Ape (Dover Thrift Editions) by Eugene
  184. The Philosophy Of Schopenhauer by Irwin Edman
  185. The Philosophy of Spinoza. Modern Library #60 by Joseph Ratner
  186. Dubliners (Penguin Classics Deluxe) by James Joyce
  187. Selected Poems (Dover Thrift Editions) by Emily Dickinson
  188. Complete Stories (Penguin Classics) by Dorothy Parker
  189. SELECTED WORKS Of ALEXANDER POPE. Modern Library #257. Edited, and with an introduction by Louis Kronenberger. by Alexander Pope
  190. The Red and the Black (Penguin Classics) by Stendhal
  191. The Life of Michelangelo Buonarroti by John Addington
  192. Of Human Bondage (Bantam Classics) by W. Somerset Maugham
  193. Three Famous French Romances: Sapho; Manon Lescaut; Carmen Antoine Francois Prevost, Proper Merimee Alphonse Daudet
  194. Napoleon by Emil Ludwig
  195. Madame Bovary (Bantam Classics) by Gustave Flaubert
  196. The Poems and Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde by Oscar Wilde
  197. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking Glass & The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll
  198. A High Wind in Jamaica (New York Review Books Classics) by Richard Hughes
  199. Anthology of American Negro Literature, ed. Sylvestre C. Watkins
  200. Beethoven: His Spiritual Development by J.W.N. Sullivan
  201. Music For The Millions: The Encyclopedia Of Musical Masterpieces by David Ewen
  202. Franz Schubert, by Ralph Bates
  203. Men of Music by Wallace Brockway and Herbert Weinstock
  204. The Potting Shed (Penguin Plays & Screenplays) by Graham Greene
  205. Politics in the American drama by Caspar Nannes
  206. Sons of Men by Herschel Steinhardt
  207. Born Yesterday by Garson Kanin
  208. Untitled and Other Radio Dramas by Norman Corwin
  209. More by Corwin: 16 radio dramas, by Norman Corwin
  210. Long Day’s Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill
  211. Best American Plays (Third Series, 1945-1951)
  212. Sixteen Famous European Plays: All Complete and Unabridged, by Bennett Cerf and Van H. Cartmell
  213. The Complete Plays of Henry James
  214. Elizabethan Plays, Written By Shakespeare’s Friends, Colleagues, Rivals, and Successors… by Hazelton Spencer
  215. Critics’ Choice; New York Drama Critics’ Circle Prize Plays, 1935-55 by Jack Gaver
  216.  Modern American Dramas by Harlan Hatcher
  217. The Album of the Cambridge Garrick Club: Containing Original and Select Papers On the Drama, and the Proceedings of That Society, with Illustrations
  218. A Shropshire Lad: Poems by A. E. Houseman by A.E. Houseman
  219. The Poetry and Prose of Heinrich Heine by Frederic Ewen
  220. The Poetical Works of John Milton, by H.C. Beeching
  221. The Poetical Works of Robert Browning
  222. Wordsworth by Richard Wilbur
  223. Shelley: Poetical Works
  224. The Portable William Blake (Portable Library), by William Blake
  225. William Shakespeare Sonnets, ed. Mary Jane Gorton
  226. Robert Burns: Poems, ed. Henry Meikle and William Beattie
  227. The Penguin Book of English Verse, ed. John Hayward
  228. Aragon: Poet of the French Resistance, by Hannah Josephson and Malcolm Cowley
  229. Collected Sonnets by Edna St Vincent Millay
  230. Robert Frost’s Poems (New Enlarged Pocket Anthology of Robert Frost’s Poems) by Louis Untermeyer
  231. Poe: Complete Poems by Richard Wilbur
  232. The Lives and Times of Archy and Mehitabel by Don Marquis
  233. A Pocketbook of Modern Verse by Oscar Williams
  234. Poems by John Tagliabue
  235. Selected Poems by Rafael Alberti
  236. The Selected Poetry of Robinson Jeffers by Robinson Jeffers
  237. The American Puritans: Their Prose and Poetry, by Perry Miller
  238. Selected Poems of Rainer Maria Rilke by Rainer Maria Rilke
  239. Poet in New York: A Bilingual Edition (English and Spanish Edition) by Federico Garcia Lorca
  240. Vapor Trail, The – Poetic Tributes to Slain World War II Hearoes of Air Group 21 and the Carrier Raiding Star by Ivan Lawrence Becker
  241. Love Poems & Love Letters for All the Year
  242. One Hundred Modern Poems, ed. Selden Rodman
  243. The Sweeniad by Myra Buttle
  244. Poetry a Magazine of Verse.Volume 70 No. 6
  245. The Wall Between by Anne Braden
  246. The Roots of American Communism by Theodore Draper
  247. A View of the Nation an Anthology: 1955-1959, ed. Henry Christman
  248. A socialist’s faith by Norman Thomas
  249. Rededication to Freedom by Benjamin Ginzburg
  250. The Ignorant Armies by E.M. Halliday
  251. Commonwealth vs. Sacco and Vanzetti by Robert P. Weeks
  252. Journey to the Beginning by Edgar Snow
  253. Das Kapital by Karl Marx
  254. Lidice by Eleanor Wheeler
  255. A Study of History by Arnold Toynbee
  256. America The Invincible – A Study of America’s Role in World Affairs by Emmet John Hughes
  257. The Unfinished Country by Max Lerner
  258. Red Mirage by John O’Kearney
  259. Background and Foreground: An Anthology Articles from the New York Times Magazine, ed. Lester
  260. The Failure of Success: The Middle-class Crisis by Esther Milner
  261. A Piece of My Mind: Reflections at Sixty by Edmund Wilson
  262. The Truth About the Munich Crisis by Viscount Maugham
  263. Alienation Modern Man by Fritz Pappenheim
  264.  A Train of Powder by Rebecca West
  265. Report from Palermo by Danilo Dolci
  266. The Devil in Massachusetts: A Modern Enquiry into the Salem Witch Trials by Marion Starkey
  267. American Rights; the Constitution in Action by Walter Gellhorn
  268. Night by Francis Pollini
  269. The Right of the People by William Douglas
  270. The Jury is Still Out by Irwin Davidson and Richard Gehman
  271. First degree by William Kunstler
  272. Democracy in America (Penguin Classics) by Alexis De Tocqueville
  273. World Underworld by Andrew Varna
  274. Catechism for Young Children: Original Edition
  275. The Prophet (A Borzoi Book) by Kahlil Gibran
  276. The Magic Word – “L-I-D-G-T-T-F-T-A-T-I-M” by Robert Collier
  277. It Was Told of a Certain Potter by Walter C. Lanyon
  278. Man Against Himself by Karl A. Menninger
  279. The Tower and the Abyss: An Inquiry into the Transformation of the Individual by Erich Kahler
  280. Something to Live By, by Dorothea S. Kopplin
  281. Man’s Supreme Inheritance: Conscious Guidance and Control in Relation to Human Evolution by Alexander F. Matthias
  282. The Miracles of Your Mind by Joseph Murphy
  283. Wisdom of the Sands by Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  284. Prison, a Paradise by Loran Hurnscot
  285. The Magic of Believing by Claude M. Bristol
  286. Peace of Mind by Joshua Loth Liebman
  287. The Use of the Self by Alexander F. Matthias
  288. TNT: The Power Within You by Claude M. Bristol
  289. The Call Girl by Harold Greenwald
  290. Troubled Women by Lucy Freeman
  291. Relax and Live by Joseph A. Kennedy
  292. Forever Young Forever Healthy by Indra Devi
  293. The Open Self by Charles Morris
  294. Hypnotism Today by Leslie Lecron and Jean Bordeaux
  295. Primitive Mythology: The Masks of God, by Joseph Campbell
  296. Some Characteristics of To-Day; A Lecture by Dr. Rudolph Steiner Given at Heidenheim on the 12th June, 1919 by Rudolph Steiner
  297. Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition (pub. 1958)
  298. Flower Arranging for Fun. by Hazel Peckinpaugh Dunlop
  299. What is a Jew? by Morris Kertzer
  300. A Partisan Guide to the Jewish Problem by Milton Steinberg
  301. Tales of Rabbi Nachman by Martin Buber
  302. The Saviours of God: Spiritual Exercises by Nikos Kazantzakis
  303. The Dead Sea Scrolls by Millar Burrows
  304. The Secret Books of the Egyptian Gnostics: An Introduction to the Gnostic Coptic Manuscripts Discovered at Chenoboskion, by Jean Doresse
  305. Memories of a Catholic Girlhood by Mary McCarthy
  306. Why I Am Not a Christian and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects by Bertrand Russell
  307.  Redemption and Other Plays by Leo Tolstoy
  308. The Portable Chekhov (Portable Library)by Anton Chekhov
  309. The House of the Dead (Dover Thrift Editions) by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  310. Crime and Punishment (Dover Thrift Editions) by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  311. The Plays of Anton Chekhov
  312. Smoke by Ivan Turgenev
  313. The Poems, Prose and Plays of Pushkin
  314. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  315. Our Knowledge of the External World (Routledge Classics) by Bertrand Russell
  316. Common Sense and Nuclear Warfare by Bertrand Russell
  317. Out of My Later Years by Albert Einstein
  318. Men and Atoms: The Discovery, the Uses and the Future of Atomic Enery by William Laurence
  319. Man Alive, You’re Half Dead! by Daniel Colin Munro
  320. Doctor Pygmalion: The Autobiogrphy of a Plastic Surgeon by Maxwell Maltz
  321. Everyman’s Search by Rebecca Beard
  322. Of Stars And Man by Harlow Shapley
  323. From Hiroshima To The Moon by Daniel Lang
  324. The Open Mind by J. Robert Oppenheimer
  325. Sexual Impotence In The Male: The Psychic Disorders Of The Sexual Function Of The Male by Leonard Paul Wershub
  326. Medea by Jeffers Robinson
  327. Antigone (Methuen Drama, Methuen Student Edition) by Jean Anouilh
  328. Bell, Book and Candle: A Comedy in Three Acts by John Van Druten
  329. The Women. by Clare Boothe
  330. Joan of Lorraine. by Maxwell Anderson
  331. The Sawbwa And His Secretary My Burmese Reminiscences by C.Y. Lee
  332. The Twain Shall Meet by Christopher Rand
  333. Kingdom of the Rocks; Memories of Oppède by Consuelo De Saint-Exupery
  334. The Heart Of India by Alexander Campbell
  335. Man-Eaters of Kumaon (Oxford India Paperbacks) by Jim Corbett
  336. Jungle Lore by Jim Corbett
  337. My India (1952) by Jim Corbett
  338. A Time In Rome by Elizabeth Bowen
  339. London by Jacques Boussard
  340. Russian Journey by William O. Douglas
  341. Golden Bough: The Roots of Religion and Folklore by James G. Frazer
  342. The Portable Dorothy Parker (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)
  343. My Antonia by Willa Cather
  344. Lucy Gayheart (Vintage Classics) by Willa Cather
  345. The Ballad of the Sad Cafe: and Other Stories by Carson McCullers
  346. Short Novels of Colette
  347. The Little Disturbances of Man (Contemporary American Fiction) by Grace Paley
  348. The Autobiography of Lincoln Steffens (California Legacy Book)
  349. Carl Sandburg’s 12-volume biography of Abraham Lincoln (Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years/Walden/The Life of Samuel Johnson/Margaret Sanger: Birth Control Pioneer (Reader’s Digest Family Treasury of Great Biographies, Volume 12))
  350. The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  351. The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats
  352.  The Thinking Body by Mabel Elsworth Todd
  353. An Actor Prepares by Konstantin Stanislavsky
  354. Duse: A Biography, by William Weaver
  355. De Humani Corporis Fabrica (Latin Edition) by Andreas Vesalius
  356. The Essays of Ralph Waldo Emerson (Collected Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson) by Ralph Waldo Emerson
  357. Gertrude Lawrence as Mrs. A., by Richard Aldrich
  358. Goodnight, Sweet Prince by Gene Fowler
  359. Greek Mythology (Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes) by Edith Hamilton
  360. I Married Adventure: The Lives of Martin and Osa Johnson (Kodansha Globe)
  361. The Importance Of Living by Lin Yutang
  362. Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke
  363. The Psychopathology of Everyday Life (The Standard Edition) (Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud) by Sigmund Freud
  364. Rains Came: A Novel of India by Louis Bromfield
  365. Rights of Man (Dover Thrift Editions) by Thomas Paine
  366. Swann’s Way by Marcel Proust
  367. To the Actor by Michael Chekhov
  368. Captain Newman, M.D.
  369. Songs for Patricia by Norman Rosten
  370. A Lost Lady (Vintage Classics) by Willa Cather
  371. Lust for Lifeby Irving Stone
  372. The Deer Park by Norman Mailer
  373. The Rebel: An Essay on Man in Revolt by Albert Camus

How many of the books listed above have you read? And if you liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Personal Brand You http://theinvisiblementor.com/personal-brand-you/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/personal-brand-you/#respond Tue, 14 Oct 2014 10:12:17 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16862 The Personal Brand You When you think of a personal brand, what comes to mind? The University of Calgary held an event on branding for its alumni living in the Toronto and surrounding areas. Derek Hassay, RBC Teaching Professor of Entrepreneurship Thinking gave us notice that he was going to talk about personal branding and […]

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The Personal Brand You

When you think of a personal brand, what comes to mind?

personal brand

The Personal Brand You

The University of Calgary held an event on branding for its alumni living in the Toronto and surrounding areas. Derek Hassay, RBC Teaching Professor of Entrepreneurship Thinking gave us notice that he was going to talk about personal branding and how to connect your personal brand with the University of Calgary, and he actually did that. This got me thinking because I thought it was quite clever what Professor Hassay did, and that anyone can do something equally clever, if he or she understands more than the fundamentals of the field. Hassay knows a lot about marketing, and as a result is able to make unusual and effective connections.

Brand: A product, organization, place or person’s perceived image.

Logo/Trademark: Captures and communicates the brand. It identifies, it doesn’t explain. A logo’s meaning is derived from the entity it represents; not vice versa.

What Logos Have the Power to do

  • Simplify decision-making
  • Provide assurance
  • Afford status
  • Facilitate connections
  • Inform/Educate
  • Challenge
  • Protect
  • Inspire/Encourage
  • Remind
  • Celebrate

Brand Equity: The tangible and intangible elements of a brand both generate and influence value. This value is referred to as brand equity – goodwill.

Personal Brand: Your personal brand is an aggregated assessment of you – an attitude, emotion, or perception held by others based on their interactions with you.

Note: It takes as little as 1/10th second to make a first impression.

Personal Branding: Similar to impression and/or reputation management. Personal branding clarifies and communicates your unique qualities and is a means to distinguish you from your peers.

Your Brand is the Product of

What you…

  • Say
  • Do
  • Buy
  • Wear
  • Support

Where you…

  • Live
  • Work
  • Go to school

Who you…

  • Marry
  • Associate with
What others…

  • Hear you say
  • See you do
  • Say about you
  • Think about you
  • Believe you value/stand for

 

The personal brand is easy to create, hard to maintain, and difficult to change. You could be locked into who you were.

How to Build Brand U

  1. Know yourself: What makes you distinct, what are your current skills and values?
  2. Invest in yourself: Improve your skills through training and professional development.
  3. Be comfortable with who you are and want to be.
  4. Smile. A positive attitude and disposition helps people.
  5. Present yourself as you wish to be perceived. Dress the part. Inconsistency kills good brands.
  6. Communicate clearly and concisely. Listen more. Great communication requires practice.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Notes from The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference 2014 http://theinvisiblementor.com/notes-the-art-of-entrepreneurship-conference-2014/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/notes-the-art-of-entrepreneurship-conference-2014/#respond Wed, 08 Oct 2014 16:17:13 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16854 Notes from The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference 2014 Yesterday, I attended The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference, where they had a good line-up of dynamic speakers, who gave the audience useful tips that they could implement immediately. I received two complimentary tickets from Ron Bester, a LinkedIn contact, who gave me a ticket to attend last […]

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Notes from The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference 2014

The Art of Entrepreneurship

Notes from The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference 2014

Yesterday, I attended The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference, where they had a good line-up of dynamic speakers, who gave the audience useful tips that they could implement immediately. I received two complimentary tickets from Ron Bester, a LinkedIn contact, who gave me a ticket to attend last year’s The Art of Small Business (Key Takeaways from the Art of Small Business Conference). Although they had very good speakers last year, my biggest criticism was that women were visibly absent from the list of speakers. TheArtOf  improved this year, and they secured Debbie Travis as a speaker, and Catherine Graham was one of the panelists.

Conferences like the ones organized by TheArtOf are important because we are exposed to new thinking and ideas. Here are my key takeaways from The Art of Entrepreneurship Conference!

Key Takeaways 

Eric Ryan, Co-Founder & Chief Brand Architect, Method

Book: The Method Method: Seven Obsessions That Helped Our Scrappy Start-up Turn an Industry Upside Down, Squeaky Green: The Method Guide to Detoxing Your Home

  • Learn to say, “Yes and” instead of “Yes, but” a concept taken from Improv. Years ago, I took an introductory improve class at Second City. I highly recommend it.
  • To build a successful business, culture is important.
  • Aesthetics is very important, so pay attention to design.
  • Innovation is the transfer of emotion!

Chris Guillebeau, Founder of World Domination Summit, Entrepreneur, Modern-Day Explorer

Books: The $100 Startup: Reinvent the Way You Make a Living, Do What You Love, and Create a New Future, The Art of Non-Conformity: Set Your Own Rules, Live the Life You Want, and Change the World (Perigee Book.),and  The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life

  • Give your customers what they really want.
  • Entrepreneurs are motivated by independence and freedom.
  • Focus on helpfulness.
  • Some people are talkers and not doers, they are called charlatans, some people do not talk, but are doers, they are martyrs, and hustlers are those who know the correct balance between talker and doer. Be a hustler, because that is one way to success.
  • Create a referral system to increase sales.

Debbie Travis, Design Superstar & Entrepreneur behind the Largest Celebrity Brand in Canada

Book: Not Guilty: My Guide to Working Hard, Raising Kids and Laughing through the Chaos

  • Dream it, do it, live it!
  • Embrace your mistakes because they often lead to success.
  • Learn from the best people.
  • Have a sense of humor because it is a form of survival.
  • Get the support you need.

Alexis Ohanian, Co-Founder of reddit, Entrepreneur, Investor, Activist

Books: Without Their Permission: How the 21st Century Will Be Made, Not Managed

  • Trust your gut when you don’t have all the data – start from where you are.
  • Create great content, chime in and be helpful.
  • Find opportunities in the down moments.
  • Entrepreneur is French for, “Has ideas, does them!”

Gary Vaynerchuk, Co-Founder & CEO of VaynerMedia, Founder of Wine Library, Entrepreneur

Avil's Smartphone Homepage Screenshot

Avil’s Smartphone Homepage Screenshot

Books: Crush It!: Why NOW Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion, The Thank You Economy, and Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How to Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World

  • Selling is about the depth of your relationships.
  • Stay in your lane – know what you are good at and hire people to perform the tasks that you are not so good at.
  • What’s on the home page of your smart phone? The home page of your smart phone says a lot about you!
  • Social media starts with the ear and not the mouth.
  • Pay attention to the behavior of your audience – watch people’s behavior and respect them.
  • Market in the current year, which means that you use the marketing strategies of the day.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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