The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com Your ideal mentor is virtually in the palm of your hands Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:12:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 Arianna Huffington Speaks at Rotman School of Management http://theinvisiblementor.com/arianna-huffington-speaks-rotman-school-management/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/arianna-huffington-speaks-rotman-school-management/#respond Wed, 26 Nov 2014 11:12:38 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17067 Arianna Huffington Speaks at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management What does success mean to you? If I met you for coffee one year from today, what would have had to happen in your life for you to feel successful – to feel like you are living the good life? Success and living […]

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Arianna Huffington Speaks at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

Arianna Huffington

Arianna Huffington comes to the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management

What does success mean to you? If I met you for coffee one year from today, what would have had to happen in your life for you to feel successful – to feel like you are living the good life? Success and living the good life are on my mind since a friend recently offered me a ticket to hear Arianna Huffington speak at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management about her life; Huffington Post, which she founded; and her new book, Thrive. And for Huffington, success is not just about the money.

About three years ago, Arianna Huffington collapsed from burnout, which was a wake-up call for her. Waking up after she had collapsed at her desk with a bloody face, made her realize what her priorities in life are. She asked herself, “Is this what success looks like?” Since then, Huffington has made sure that she gets enough sleep each night. “Burnout is the disease of civilization…Burnout is not the essential price of success. Human beings are designed for downtime,” says Huffington.

Being well-rested at the start of each day makes you more productive, but when you are bombarded with articles about CEOs and other very successful people waking up each morning between 4:00 am and 6:00 am, those aspiring to be successful leaders often feel like slackers for not arising that early. What the articles do not say is what time these über successful people go to bed at nights. So there seems to be a tension between getting enough sleep and being productive. But there isn’t really any tension, because what I have discovered for myself, is that when I do not get enough sleep during the night, my effectiveness decreases, and although I am working long hours, I am not accomplishing much.

Arianna Huffington

Arianna Huffington and Roger Martin, former Dean of Rotman School of Management

To make sure that you get enough sleep, while accomplishing the things that are important to you, you have to say “No” more often and that is something that Huffington struggles with. She recommends that you find ways to collaborate more often. She also says that the way you know that  you have had enough sleep is when you wake-up by yourself without an alarm – this is something that I have been doing for years. For some reason though, my body needs more sleep during the winter than during the summer months.

During the talk, Huffington was very philosophical, citing the Greek philosophers, who would often wax poetic about “What is the good life?” As a start, define “what is the good life for yourself?”, then start moving toward your idea of the good life.

Actionable Items from Arianna Huffington

  1. If you are sleeping less than eight hours each night, tonight, get 30 minutes more sleep.
  2. Wake-up without alarms.
  3. Turnoff mobile devices and keep them out of the bedroom.
  4. Do a life audit, are you satisfied with what you discover?
  5. Completing a project sometimes mean dropping it. Are your goals still relevant? Are you working on personal projects that are no longer relevant? If yes, stop working on them now.

Liked this post? Share on social media as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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22 CEOs Favorite Books – Books that Influence http://theinvisiblementor.com/22-ceos-favorite-books-books-influence/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/22-ceos-favorite-books-books-influence/#respond Tue, 25 Nov 2014 11:12:51 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17057 22 CEOs Favorite Books – Books that Influence Are you looking for recommendations for which books to read next? Twenty-two CEOs reveal the books that have influenced them. The list is eclectic and there is something for everyone. What I would recommend is that you choose books from genres that you like, but to also […]

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22 CEOs Favorite Books – Books that Influence

Are you looking for recommendations for which books to read next? Twenty-two CEOs reveal the books that have influenced them. The list is eclectic and there is something for everyone. What I would recommend is that you choose books from genres that you like, but to also venture into the world of the unknown and read genres that you are unfamiliar with. Science fiction is a genre that I have never cared for, but a few years ago, I started off with Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series, and now I am much more comfortable reading books from the genre. I do not enjoy all of them, but I always learn something new. Which new genre are you prepared to start reading?

Related Posts

Book Review: Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov
A Look At Foundation’s Edge, Foundation and Earth and Forward the Foundation By Isaac Asimov
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card, Book Review
The Republic, one of the Great Dialogues of Plato

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos

Steve Jobs, Apple

Tim Cook, Apple

Larry Ellison, Oracle

Bill Gates, Microsoft Founder

Warren Buffet, Berkshire Hathaway

Josh James, Domo

Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh

Muhtar Kent, Coca Cola

Jim Quigley, Deloitte & Touche

Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook

Marillyn Hewson, Lockheed Martin

Randall Stephenson, AT&T

Ken Powell, General Mills

Larry Page, Google

Meg Whitman, Hewlett Packard

Jamie Dimon, JP Morgan

Elon Musk, Spacex/Tesla

James Gorman, Morgan Stanley

Richard Branson, Virgin

Jack Dorsey, Square/Twitter

Marissa Mayer, Yahoo

 

CEO Favorite Books

22 CEOs Favorite Books – Books that Influence

Key Takeaway

The most successful CEOs are readers, but the books that they read are diverse, therefore, the major lesson here is to read broadly and deeply.

What to do Next – 3 Ways to Apply this Information

  1. Each month, read one book from the list. At the end of the year, you would have read 12 books that have influenced some of the most successful CEOs.
  2. Make notes of information from each of the 12 the books that you can apply to your work.
  3. Apply the new information, and teach to share with your colleagues.

Liked this post? Share on social media as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Ernest Hemingway Recommended Books for Writers http://theinvisiblementor.com/ernest-hemingway-recommended-books-writers/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/ernest-hemingway-recommended-books-writers/#respond Mon, 24 Nov 2014 11:12:19 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17049 Ernest Hemingway’s Recommended Books for Writers Born in 1899, Ernest Hemingway was a novelist and short story writer. He was an ambulance driver in World War I and was also involved in the Spanish Civil War and World War II. He worked briefly as a journalist in Toronto and was a correspondent during the Greek-Turkish […]

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Ernest Hemingway’s Recommended Books for Writers

Born in 1899, Ernest Hemingway was a novelist and short story writer. He was an ambulance driver in World War I and was also involved in the Spanish Civil War and World War II. He worked briefly as a journalist in Toronto and was a correspondent during the Greek-Turkish War. Hemingway spent considerable time in France, Italy, Spain, the West Indies and Cuba, as well as embarked on two African safaris. He was influenced by Stendhal, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Ivan Turgenev, Joseph Conrad and Mark Twain, and their books are in his personal library. In fact, some of their books are on his recommended reading list for aspiring writers.

Ernest Hemingway produced some of his best work during the decade, 1926 – 1936. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature 1954 for “his mastery of the art of narrative, most recently demonstrated in The Old Man and the Sea, and for the influence that he has exerted on contemporary style.” In 1953, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for the Old Man and the Sea. Ernest Hemingway is considered one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. If you an aspiring writer, Ernest Hemingway prepared a recommended list of books for you.

Ernest Hemingway’s Recommended Reading List

  1. Ernest Hemingway

    Ernest Hemingway’s Recommended Reading List

    The Blue Hotel, Stephen Crane

  2. The Open Boat , Stephen Crane
  3. Madame Bovary: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition), Gustave Flaubert
  4. Dubliners, James Joyce
  5. The Red and the Black (Penguin Classics), Stendhal
  6. Of Human Bondage (Bantam Classics), Somerset Maugham
  7. Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
  8. War and Peace (Vintage Classics), Leo Tolstoy
  9. Buddenbrooks – The Original Classic Edition, Thomas Mann
  10. Hail and Farewell, Volumes I, II, III: Ave, Salve, Vale, George Moore
  11. The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  12. The Oxford Book of English Verse
  13. The Enormous Room, E.E. Cummings
  14. Wuthering Heights (Dover Thrift Editions), Emily Bronte
  15. Far Away and Long Ago: A Childhood in Argentina, W.H. Hudson
  16. The American (Penguin Classics), Henry James
  17. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce
  18. The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling (Penguin Classics), Henry Fielding
  19. The Portrait of a Lady (Penguin Classics), Henry James
  20. Joseph Andrews, Henry Fielding
  21. Fathers and Sons, Ivan Turgenev
  22. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain
  23. Remembrance of Things Past: Volume I – Swann’s Way & Within a Budding Grove (Vintage), Marcel Proust
  24. Ulysses, James Joyce
  25. The Turn of the Screw (Dover Thrift Editions), Henry James
  26. Sons and Lovers, DH Lawrence
  27. Sentimental Education (Penguin Classics), Gustave Flaubert
  28. A Sportman’s Sketches, Ivan Turgenev
  29. The AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS (REISSUE), William Butler Yeats

Books Ernest Hemingway Wanted to Read Again

  1. Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
  2. Ernest HemingwayFar Away and Long Ago: A Childhood in Argentina, W.H. Hudson
  3. Buddenbrooks – The Original Classic Edition, Thomas Mann
  4. Wuthering Heights (Dover Thrift Editions), Emily Brontë
  5. Madame Bovary: (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, Gustave Flaubert
  6. War and Peace (Vintage Classics), Leo Tolstoy
  7. A Sportman’s Sketches, Ivan Turgenev
  8. The Brothers Karamazov, Fyodor Dostoevsky
  9. Hail and Farewell, Volumes I, II, III: Ave, Salve, Vale, George Moore
  10. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain
  11. Winesburg, Ohio, Sherwood Anderson
  12. Queen Margot: A Play in Five Acts, Alexandre Dumas
  13. The Maison Tellier, Guy de Maupassant
  14. The Red and the Black (Penguin Classics), Stendhal
  15. La Chartreuse de Parme, Stendhal
  16. Dubliners, James Joyce
  17. Reveries over Childhood and Youth, William Butler Yeats
  18. The Trembling of the Veil, William Butler Yeats
  19. Man’s Fate (La Condition Humaine), Andre Malraux

15 Books from Ernest Hemingway’s Personal Library

  1. Appointment in Samarra (Penguin Classics Deluxe), a novel, John O’Hara
  2. Growth of the Soil (Penguin Classics), Knut Hamsun
  3. Paris Was Our Mistress: Memoirs of a Lost and Found Generation, Samuel Putnam
  4. In Search of Lost Time: Proust 6-pack (Proust Complete), Marcel Proust
  5. Of whales and men, Robert Blackwood Robertson
  6. The Jungle and the Damned, Hassoldt Davis
  7. The Divine Comedy (The Inferno, The Purgatorio, and The Paradiso), Dante Alighieri
  8. The Unquiet Grave: A Word Cycle by Palinurus, Cyril Connolly
  9. THE MOONLIGHT A novel, Joyce Cary
  10. The life of Rudyard Kipling, Charles Carrington
  11. Typee, Herman Melville
  12. The Collected Plays of W. Somerset Maugham, W. Somerset Maugham
  13. Bolero, a novel., Melanie Pflaum
  14. The Melody of Chaos, Houston Peterson
  15. Sinistro and Celebration: 19 Poems By A. E. T.

Key Takeaways

The greatest writers are also well-read, and this is true of Ernest Hemingway. Additionally, write about what you know, therefore it is important to immerse yourself in different experiences. Hemingway was well traveled and he lived in many countries whose cultures were very different from the one he was brought up in. These experiences provided context, texture and depth to his stories.

What to do Next – 3 Ways to Apply this Information

  1. Each month, read one book from Ernest Hemingway’s list of recommended books for aspiring writers. At the end of the year, you would have read 12 books that are very well written. Great writers are great readers
  2. Make notes of information and techniques from each of the 12 the books that you can apply to your craft.
  3. Experiment with the new information and techniques in your writing.

The information for this post was obtained from the following sources:

Hemingway’s Reading 1910-1940, an Inventory, Michael S. Reynolds

18 Books Ernest Hemingway Wished He Could Read Again for the First Time

Ernest Hemingway Creates a Reading List for a Young Writer, 1934

LibraryThing 

Related Posts:

Jack Layton Personal Library
Marilyn Monroe Personal Library
CS Lewis Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Oscar Wilde Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Emily Dickinson Personal Library
Katharine Hepburn Personal Library
Frederick Douglass Personal Library
The Personal Library of George Washington
The Personal Library of Carl Sandburg
Why read, what to read, and Teddy Roosevelt

Liked this post? Share on social media as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Olfactive Branding: Using the Power of Scent in Your Business http://theinvisiblementor.com/olfactive-branding-using-power-scent-business/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/olfactive-branding-using-power-scent-business/#respond Fri, 21 Nov 2014 11:12:32 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17033 Olfactive Branding: Using the Power of Scent in Your Business Recently, I became aware of olfactive branding, and I was curious about the concept and wanted to learn more about it. If you walked into the Trump Hotel and Tower in Toronto, you would smell champagne and caviar. Tracy Pepe, an olfactive branding specialist created […]

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Olfactive Branding: Using the Power of Scent in Your Business

Olfactive Branding

Olfactive Branding: Using the Power of Scent in Your Business – Tracy Pepe, Nose Knows Consulting

Recently, I became aware of olfactive branding, and I was curious about the concept and wanted to learn more about it. If you walked into the Trump Hotel and Tower in Toronto, you would smell champagne and caviar. Tracy Pepe, an olfactive branding specialist created that unique smell for the company. The champagne and caviar scent creates images of luxury, which is what you would expect from the Trump Hotel and Tower. Olfactive branding, also known as scent branding is a growing trend, and in fact, some retailers are using it to make consumers linger in the store, and spend more money.

Some people may view scent branding, the way some retailers are using it, as manipulative, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Scent design is more about creating a positive experience and environment for clients and customers. Imagine having a scent in the office that has a calming effect on everyone? That would help to reduce stress-related issues in the workplace.

Because I wanted to learn more about olfactive branding, so that I could write about it, I conducted an email interview with Tracy Pepe, a renowned olfactive branding specialist. Before we dive into the interview, here is a video of her speaking about olfactive branding. And if you like what you hear, and you live in the Greater Toronto Area, on November 26th, Ellevate Network, of  which I am the president of the Toronto Chapter, will be hosting an Olfactive Branding Holiday Event in Toronto. See details at the end of the post if you are interested.

Avil Beckford: Why did you choose to become an olfactive branding specialist?

Tracy Pepe: I never chose to be an Olfactive Branding Specialist – it developed over my 27 years of passion – my love of all scents. The interest and support came from individuals and companies who encouraged me to continue exploring this concept. The actual idea of Olfactive Branding started over 15 years ago when an architect, Peter Heys from IBI asked me if we could develop a scent for an office building and very large global brand.

Avil Beckford: What are the benefits for businesses to create unique scents?

Tracy Pepe: Every space has a scent, whether one adds it to the space or it is a bi-product of the environment. Controlling and adding a scent that empowers the brand is an easy way to reinforce the values of a brand. Scent is emotional, and for branding it is key to tap into the emotional connection, scent is a wonderful avenue to do this.

Avil Beckford: Why should individuals, solopreneurs and small businesses care about olfactive branding?

Tracy Pepe: The way a space smells is key to the experience. It is similar to good lighting, and colour, the wrong elements make the space uncomfortable and can impact on the consumer’s experience.   If unpleasant scents such as smoke, basement scents, moth balls, cat urine, cleaning aromas, shoe and sock smells etc. are present, the consumer smells it as the first impression, many who work there are “smell blind” and have no idea what the space feels like. As well, some spaces just have flat aroma from just the presence of people, or the lack of air flow, that creates a “stuffy” feel.

Avil Beckford: What are some inexpensive ways that small businesses can capitalize on the power of olfactive branding?

Tracy Pepe:

  1. First, smell everything! Start with your coffee, your meals, develop your scent pallet. Then in the space, smell pillows, carpets, close your eyes, enter a room a take a deep breath – ask yourself if this is a nice place? What does it smell like? Do not look at it; just smell it, usually that will be the start.
  2. Second – do not mask odors, remove them and clean them up – scents layered can smell worse.
  3. Third – find a signature scent that you like, avoid flowers, keep the aroma neutral/gender, keep the levels low, you can use candles, diffusers, drops of essential oils (found in a grocery store) in a small burner, consciously add a scent to complement the story of the brand.
  4. Four – Now, tie one element of your company’s brand to an odour molecule, so for example, say you run a children’s day care, your branding colours are pink, choose a berry or juicy scent that captures what message you are giving to the customers. Have this scent in the front area when parents come to pick up their kids. If you are marketing at a trade show, have that scent in the booth. You can also tie it in with social media: every time there is an article about scents relating to children, berries, pink you can post this. This is very easy to set up with a Google alert – the articles are filtered for you.

Another example, say you are a dog walker, maybe your signature scent is cedar wood, because you walk those dogs everywhere and you are outside. It is important to convey to your customers, you are walking the dogs! Every time the scent is present it is branding your values; walking – outdoors – value.

Olfactive Branding is about adding elements of aroma into the brand that captures the experience. Scent is my tool because it is the most powerful for recall action in the mind. However one can capture recall from all areas of our senses; sight, sound, taste, touch and smell. Branding is about the enforcement of your message to your customer.

Avil Beckford: Tell me a bit about the scent of colours.

Tracy Pepe: As a perfumer we are trained that fragrance molecules are vibrations, and these molecules vibrate similar to colours. Understanding that certain colours captures various vibrations; a perfumer can match these colours to the scent. Traditional perfumers, who create aromas for the body, are more focused on the person, their personality, but with my discipline I focus on the space. And every good designer knows that balanced colour pallets are the key with good design – scent is one of those pallets.

 

 

Ellevate Network Toronto

YOU are invited to a UNIQUE Holiday Event!

 

Join Ellevate and many other women who are some of Toronto’s Top Professionals to learn from renowned speaker TRACY PEPE onOlfactive Branding.

Scent Branding…. the scented story of
“Champagne and Caviar” 
A discussion on the design process of
The Toronto Trump Olfactive Brand
Scent | Story | Design | Inspiration


Meet an incredible visionary who has been scenting spaces for almost 20 years. Most recently, she has amazed Toronto with the success of her “Champagne and Caviar” scenting of the Trump Hotel.  Learn more how scenting and olfactive branding can help your business and network with some of Toronto’s Women Executives.
Wednesday November 26, 2014
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

Ember Business Exchange
1 Yonge Street, Suite 2002
Toronto, ON
M5E 1E5

MEMBER PRICE:                 $25
NON-MEMBER PRICE:         $35

REGISTER HERE: https://www.ellevatenetwork.com/events/3722

All proceeds from the Raffle will be donated to Because I am a Girl!

Thanks to Our SPONSORS

 


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About The Ellevate Network

Ellevate has been featured in Fortune Magazine, CNN, Elle, MSNBC, The Wall Street Journal, Working Mother, TIME and more. Our community is made up of professional women from a variety of industries, who are active in more than 40 global chapters. For more information on Ellevate, visit https://www.ellevatenetwork.com

About the Speaker

Tracy Pepe is a distinguished lecturer at a variety of organizations. She holds many awards, nominations and accolades for her work, and is held in very high esteem for her articles supporting sensorial solutions in spaces.

Links:
Information relating to Olfactive Design, Globe & Mail
Pepe’s Corporate blog
The Seduction of Scent with CBC, the story of scent
Video: Pepe’s design process with the Trump Hotel
To learn more about the firm’s work

 

 

Could you use scent branding in your business? If you’d like to learn more about olfactive branding, join us on November 26th – details are listed above. Liked this post? Share and comment on social media as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Tips from the Entrepreneur Symposium Held in Toronto http://theinvisiblementor.com/tips-entrepreneur-symposium-held-toronto/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/tips-entrepreneur-symposium-held-toronto/#respond Tue, 18 Nov 2014 11:12:46 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17025 Tips from the Entrepreneur Symposium Held in Toronto Recently at the Entrepreneur Symposium held in Toronto, the presenters shared some tips and tricks to help entrepreneurs to become more successful. Today, I will focus on Chris Hokansson from One Red Bird, and Ann Kaplan, CEO and President of iFinance Canada Inc. Further Reading: 7 Vital […]

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Tips from the Entrepreneur Symposium Held in Toronto

Recently at the Entrepreneur Symposium held in Toronto, the presenters shared some tips and tricks to help entrepreneurs to become more successful. Today, I will focus on Chris Hokansson from One Red Bird, and Ann Kaplan, CEO and President of iFinance Canada Inc.

Chris Hokansson

Tips from the Entrepreneur Symposium Held in Toronto

Further Reading: 7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit by Colin Sprake

5 Marketing Mistakes and their Solutions – Chris Hokansson

Definition of Marketing: Everything you do in your business to make the phone ring.
Definition of Sales: What happens when the phone rings and you answer it.

Mistake 1: Thinking that it’s about you. It’s not about us or we, prospects do not care about you. Create a reason for them to care.
Solution 1: See things through the eyes of your customers. Take a long look at your business and service through the eyes of your customers. Ask them what they like about your business/product/service.

Mistake 2: No call-to-action. Is it clear what the customer is supposed to do next?
Solution 2: Ensure that your marketing compels an action. If you want people to go to a website to download a video, tell them to do that.

Mistake 3: Target everyone. Who is your real customer? Who are your raving lunatic fan?
Solution 3: Invest in acquiring only your best targets. You cannot be everything to everyone. Know which customers you are after.

Mistake 4: Forgetting about current customers. It is okay to market to the customers that you already have.
Solution 4: Upsell and cross-sell to your current customers. Consider bundling products and services. Take a page out of Amazon’s book – customers who buy this, tend to buy that.

Mistake 5: Not measuring. How do you know what is working? Is your campaign working? Measure what you are doing.
Solution 5: Try some marketing experiments and keep doing them until you see what gets results. Create customer personas.

Tips from Ann Kaplan

  1. Find a need and fill it to become successful. Find a solution to a problem.
  2. Investors do not invest in companies, they invest in people.
  3. Be proactive, put your name up for awards.
  4. Attend events and secure speaking engagements to create a profile around you.
  5. Have audacious goals.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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F Scott Fitzgerald Personal Library http://theinvisiblementor.com/f-scott-fitzgerald-personal-library/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/f-scott-fitzgerald-personal-library/#respond Mon, 17 Nov 2014 11:12:57 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17015 F Scott Fitzgerald Personal Library Born on September 24, 1896, F Scott Fitzgerald, novelist, essayist and short story writer is best known for The Great Gatsby, which accurately depicted the Jazz Age and the Roaring Twenties boom years of excess. He often wrote about tragic love. While at Princeton, Fitzgerald began his literary career, and […]

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F Scott Fitzgerald Personal Library

F Scott Fitzgerald

F Scott Fitzgerald Essential Reading List – Image Credit via Open Culture

Born on September 24, 1896, F Scott Fitzgerald, novelist, essayist and short story writer is best known for The Great Gatsby, which accurately depicted the Jazz Age and the Roaring Twenties boom years of excess. He often wrote about tragic love. While at Princeton, Fitzgerald began his literary career, and he loved it so much that he started to neglect his studies and subsequently dropped out of school. At Princeton, he contributed pieces to the Princeton Tigers, Nassau Literary Magazine and wrote for Princeton Triangle Club’s musicals.

After leaving Princeton, F Scott Fitzgerald joined the army. Although Charles Scribner’s Sons rejected his first novel, The Romantic Egoist, the publisher asked him to revise and resubmit. Scribner’s rejected the revised novel, but in 1919, after he was discharged from the army, Fitzgerald rewrote the novel and changed the title to This Side Of Paradise, and it was published on March 26, 1920.

During F Scott Fitzgerald’s lifetime, 44 years, he published 160 magazine stories, many of which were published in the Saturday Evening Post. His best short stories include: “Bernice Bobs Her Hair,” “May Day,” “The Diamond as Big as the Ritz,” “Winter Dreams,” “The Rich Boy,” “Babylon Revisited,” and “Crazy Sunday.” Some of his stories were considered second rate, which demonstrates that no one can consistently perform at peak, but that doesn’t mean that you should stop producing.

What I liked about F Scott Fitzgerald is his ability to persist and persevere. He revised and rewrote his work when it was necessary. He received most of his acclaim as a writer after his death – his masterpiece, The Great Gatsby was not well-received during his lifetime. If you are a writer, the lesson to you is that persistence and perseverance pays. There were over 300 books in F Scott Fitzgerald’s personal library and I have included only a few. Take a look at the books to get insights into the shaping of a mind.

This post was made possible because of the excellent work of Library Thing and Open Culture.

Related Posts

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Book Review
Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf, Review
My Antonia by Willa Cather, Review
A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen, Review
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde, Book Review

 F Scott Fitzgerald Personal Library

  1. F Scott Fitzgerald

    F Scott Fitzgerald Personal Library

    Jennifer Lorn: A Sedate Extravaganza, Elinor Wylie

  2. Mentone, Cairo, and Corfu, Constance Fenimore Woolson
  3. Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf
  4. SALOME – La Sainte Courtisane – A Florentine Tragedy, Oscar Wilde
  5. The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde
  6. Ethan Frome, Edith Wharton
  7. D. H. Lawrence, Rebecca West
  8. Joan and Peter: A Story of an Education, H. G. Wells
  9. The Complete Works of Lyof N. Tolstoï, Leo Tolstoy
  10. The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare
  11. Samples: A Collection of Short Stories, Lillie Ryttenberg
  12. Half way: An autobiography, Cecil Roberts
  13. Million and One Nights: A History of the Motion Picture Through 1925 (A Touchstone book), Terry Ramsaye
  14. Within a Budding Grove: Remembrance of Things Past, Volume 2, Marcel Proust
  15. The Captive, Marcel Proust
  16. Time Regained: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. VI (Modern Library Classics) (v. 6), Marcel Proust
  17. The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven Edition Table Of Contents And Index Of The Five Volumes, Edgar Allan Poe
  18. PLUTARCH: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans (Complete and Unabridged), Plutarch
  19. The Trial and Death of Socrates: Being the Euthyphron, Apology, Crito and Phaedo of Plato, Plato
  20. Petronius (Petronius: Cena Trimalchionis), Arbiter Petronius
  21. Early English poems, Henry Spackman Pancoast
  22. Introduction to philosophy, Friedrich Paulsen
  23. cream of the Jug: An Anthology of Humorous Stories, Grant Overton
  24. Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Khayyam Omar
  25. The White Rooster: And Other Poems,, George O’Neil
  26. Pistols for two, H. L. Mencken
  27. Advanced Geography, Frank M. McMurry
  28. Manifesto of the Communist Party, Karl Marx
  29. Letters of John Marin, John Marin
  30. The memoirs of Baron de Marbot: Late lieutenant-general in the French army, Jean-Baptiste-Antoine-Marcelin Marbot
  31. Sinister Street, Compton Mackenzie
  32. Babbitt, Sinclair Lewis
  33. Haveth Childers Everywhere Fragment from Work in Progress., James Joyce
  34. Finnegans Wake (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin), James Joyce
  35. Dubliners (Dover Thrift Editions), James Joyce
  36. Chamber Music, James Joyce
  37. The Victory Murders, Foster Johns
  38. Blood and Sand, Vicente Blasco Ibanez
  39. Memoirs of William Hickey (The Prodigal Rake: Memoirs Of William Hickey), William Hickey
  40. East and West: Poems, Bret Harte
  41. The Glorious Adventure, Richard Halliburton
  42. North of Boston: Poems, Robert Frost
  43. The Poetical Works of John Dryden, John Dryden
  44. An American Tragedy (Signet Classics), Theodore Dreiser
  45. Jennie Gerhardt A Novel, Theodore Dreiser
  46. Adventures and Letters of Richard Harding Davis, Richard Harding Davis
  47. A beginner’s history of philosophy, Herbert Ernest Cushman
  48. The Enormous Room, E. E. Cummings
  49. The Spy, James Fenimore Cooper
  50. The Arrow of Gold, Joseph Conrad
  51. Shutter of Snow (Virago Modern Classics), Emily Holmes Coleman
  52. Stuffed Peacocks (Short Story Index Reprint Series), Emily Clark
  53. The Napoleon of Notting Hill – The Original Classic Edition, Gilbert K. Chesterton
  54. My Antonia, Willa Cather
  55. Through the Looking-Glass, Lewis Carroll
  56. How to Study Architecture – An Attempt to Trace the Evolution of Architecture As the Product and Expression of Successive Phases of Civilisation, Charles Henry Caffin
  57. The Poetical Works of Lord Byron: With Memoir and the Original Explanatory Notes, &c, George Gordon Byron Byron
  58. The Decameron, Giovanni Boccaccio
  59. The Undertaker’s Garland, John Peale Bishop
  60. The Coward – Primary Source Edition, Robert Hugh Benson
  61. Poor White: A Novel, Sherwood Anderson
  62. The Journal of a Disappointed Man, W. N. P. Barbellion
  63. Montaigne: Essays, Michel de Montaigne

F Scott Fitzgerald Essential Reading List

  1. Sister Carrie: Original and Unabridged, Theodore Dreiser
  2. The Life of Jesus, Ernest Renan
  3. A Doll’s House, Henrik Ibsen
  4. Winesburg, Ohio, Sherwood Anderson
  5. The Old Wives’ Tale, Arnold Bennett
  6. The Maltese Falcon, Dashiel Hammett
  7. The Red and the Black (Penguin Classics), Stendahl
  8. The Short Stories of Guy De Maupassant, translated by Michael Monahan
  9. An Outline of Abnormal Psychology (Modern Library, 152.1), edited by Gardner Murphy
  10. The Stories of Anton Chekhov, edited by Robert N. Linscott
  11. The Best American Humorous Short Stories, edited by Alexander Jessup
  12. Victory, Joseph Conrad
  13. The Revolt of the Angels, Anatole France
  14. Plays of Oscar Wilde (Wordsworth Classics)
  15. Sanctuary (Sanctuary: The Corrected Text), William Faulkner
  16. Within a Budding Grove: Remembrance of Things Past, Volume 2, Marcel Proust
  17. The Guermantes Way, Marcel Proust
  18. Swann’s Way: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. 1 (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition), Marcel Proust
  19. South Wind – Norman Douglas, Norman Douglas
  20. The Garden Party, Katherine Mansfield
  21. War and Peace (Vintage Classics), Leo Tolstoy
  22. John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley: Complete Poetical Works (A Modern Library Giants)

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

Sources Referenced/Cited

St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, Ed. Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast. Vol. 2. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000. p109-111.
Modern American Literature, Vol. 1. 5th ed. Detroit: St. James Press, 1999. p368-374. COPYRIGHT 1999 St. James Press.

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7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit by Colin Sprake http://theinvisiblementor.com/7-vital-steps-to-maximizing-growth-sales-profit-colin-sprake/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/7-vital-steps-to-maximizing-growth-sales-profit-colin-sprake/#respond Wed, 12 Nov 2014 12:58:21 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17010 7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit by Colin Sprake Recently, I attended the Entrepreneur Symposium where Colin Sprake, the founder of Make Your Mark delivered an excellent presentation on the 7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit. The thrust of the presentation was on focusing on the needs of your […]

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7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit by Colin Sprake

Colin Sprake

7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit by Colin Sprake

Recently, I attended the Entrepreneur Symposium where Colin Sprake, the founder of Make Your Mark delivered an excellent presentation on the 7 Vital Steps to Maximizing Growth, Sales & Profit. The thrust of the presentation was on focusing on the needs of your clients and prospects. His advice, which makes sense, is contrarian to what we are taught. So, for instance, we are taught to craft an elevator pitch, and at events, when we introduce ourselves to say it. The elevator pitch should include name, company name and the products and service we offer.

Colin Sprake recommends that we do not mention any of those, but instead try to figure out what people’s needs are. I recently read that at a networking event, do not ask people to tell you what they do, but ask what projects they are working on now because it is so common today for people to be working on projects. This question would satisfy what Sprake is driving at, and I have had much success learning about someone by asking that one question. Additionally, Sprake is not alone in recommending that people ditch the elevator pitch, Michel Neray, a marketing communication strategist says the same thing, and recommends that people start a conversation. Neray teaches people how to craft their Essential Message.

Here are some tips from Colin Sprake’s presentation.

  1. Vital Step # 7: Destination
    1. Have a vivid vision. Where are you going? Most people spend more time planning a vacation than they do on planning their business. Have a five year vision, but a one year plan.
    2. Have a dynamic focus. Once you have a vision, you have something to focus on.
    3. Be tenacious. Are you willing to do what it takes to become successful? Have the tenacity to achieve your vision.
    4. Have a sacrifice plan. Why did you get into business? Make sacrifices to get to where you want to go. Have a defined timeline, involve your family, inform everyone, and maximize your success.
    5. Have commitment management. How you use your time is important. Say ‘no’ more, set office hours, and ask for an agenda before meetings.
  2. Vital Step # 6: Focus
    1. Determine what you want to be!
      1. Me Too!
      2. Me Special
      3. Me Only: The Blue Ocean Strategy of prosperity. This is where you want to be.
    2. What product or service can you add in your business to be Me Only?
    3. Branding vs. Marketing
      1. Branding – differentiating yourself.
      2. Marketing – getting people to notice the differences by appealing to the five senses.
      3. Logo is part of the brand image.
      4. Sell the sizzle not the steak. Sell what appeals to people’s emotions.
      5. Branding comes before marketing.
      6. Brand is not a logo or a tagline.
    4. People want one of four things.
      1. Can you solve a problem for them? Be a problem solver!
      2. Can you provide a better outcome?
      3. Can you provide a miracle?
      4. Is there an emotional payoff they can receive?
    5. If you are not standing out, you are invisible.
    6. There are two types of buyers.
      1. Pain avoiders.
      2. Pleasure seekers.
    7. What are people complaining about in your target market? When your client is talking, you can learn what her problem is.
    8. Determine your audience.
      1. Most people do not hang out where they can find their clients.
      2. What are the demographics of your clients – education, age, and network.
      3. What are their habits? What do they read?
      4. What medium works for you? Mine where there are diamonds, focus on the rich areas first, focus on people’s attention span, and use multiple mediums for multiple markets.
  3. Vital Step # 5: Powerful Headlines
    1. Must be attention grabbing. Home page should have a killer headline.
    2. Target the pain of the reader, viewer or listener.
    3. Must scream, “This is for me!”
    4. Don’t make your logo your amigo.
  4. Vital Step # 4: Advertisement
    1. Powerful headlines.
    2. Urgency and scarcity.
    3. Lots of white space.
    4. Easy to read.
    5. Emotional pictures
    6. Strong call to action.
    7. Bridge gap with credibility.
    8. Minimum five to seven repetitions.
  5. Vital Step # 3: Powerful Networking
    1. Go where your prospects are.
    2. Build relationships and make money.
    3. People don’t care about you until you care about them.
    4. Need a powerful message that speaks to the pain of people at the table.
    5. Tell them what you can do for them.
    6. Can have different messages for different markets and products.
  6. Vital Step # 2: Maximize Sales
    1. Typically, most businesses spend 25 percent of the time on production; 65 percent on operations; and 10 percent of time on sales and marketing.
    2. Rapid success businesses spend 25 percent of the time on production; 10 percent on operations; and 65 percent of time on sales and marketing.
    3. Increase the amount of time you spend on marketing and sales.
  7. Vital Step # 1: You!
    1. Reward vs. Penalty.
    2. Results vs. Excuses.
    3. Can vs. Can’t.
    4. Change your mind and change your life.

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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I Robot by Isaac Asimov, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/i-robot-by-isaac-asimov-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/i-robot-by-isaac-asimov-book-review/#respond Tue, 11 Nov 2014 18:13:07 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17004 I Robot by Isaac Asimov, Book Review A friend once told me that she is scared to read science fiction. She is scared because sci-fi often predicts certain scientific developments, which she doesn’t want to learn about. For her, some of those predictions may be scary, and she thinks that she is better off not […]

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I Robot by Isaac Asimov, Book Review

I Robot

I, Robot by Isaac Asimov, Book Review

A friend once told me that she is scared to read science fiction. She is scared because sci-fi often predicts certain scientific developments, which she doesn’t want to learn about. For her, some of those predictions may be scary, and she thinks that she is better off not knowing. In I Robot, and the other robot stories in the series, Isaac Asimov predicts certain real developments in the field of robotics. A point worth noting, is that Karel Čapek, a prolific Czech writer, introduced the word robot in his play, R. U. R. (Rossum’s Universal Robots) in 1921, but The Oxford English Dictionary credits Isaac Asimov with the earliest uses of robotics and positronic. Robot stories are predictors for human relationships with technology.

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Karel Čapek: Novelist, Playwright, and Essayist Who Introduced the Word Robot to the World
Book Review: Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov
A Look At Foundation’s Edge, Foundation and Earth and Forward the Foundation By Isaac Asimov

Asimov’s robot fictional stories are in five volumes – I, Robot, The Rest of the Robots, The Complete Robot, Robot Dreams (Remembering Tomorrow) and Robot Visions. The Three Laws of Robotics are first articulated in I, Robot by Isaac Asimov, and they quoted from the textbook, the Handbook of Robotics.

Three Laws of Robotics

  1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  2. A robot must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

When the story begins in 2057, Dr. Susan Calvin, chief robo-psychologist for United States Robots, is being interviewed by a journalist, who cannot remember a time when robots didn’t exist. Dr. Calvin is 75 years old and about to retire. The way that Asimov unfolds I, Robot is by interspersing the book with many robot stories, while the robo-psychologist is reminiscing. The journalist has a lot of information, but what he wants from Dr. Calvin is the human interest angle he can include in his article.

The first robot story is about Robbie, a nursemaid robot, to an 8-year old Gloria. It is interesting that Robbie doesn’t take the place of a regular nursemaid because he doesn’t have any power over the child. Robbie is more of a playmate for his charge. Grace Weston, Gloria’s mother, is very concerned about the relationship that Gloria has with the robot because she doesn’t think it is natural or good for any child – her daughter doesn’t have any human friends her age. Because of this, the mother develops an intense hatred of robots. Robbie is subsequently returned to US Robots. Gloria is saddened by the loss of Robbie and in the end Grace concedes when Robbie saves Gloria’s life, and the robot is returned to her daughter.

In another story in I, Robot, Speedy is designed to work in the mines of Mercury. The robot has been sent to retrieve selenium, however, it has not returned. Greg Powell and Mike Donovan, two scientists working for US Robot, whose jobs are to test robots in actual working conditions, have to figure out why Speedy has not returned. Using deductive reasoning, the two figure out that the robot is conflicted and stuck because of Rule 2 and Rule 3 of the Laws of Robotics. Speedy faces a dilemma, humans have asked him to retrieve selenium which will endanger his existence.

The next story takes place on a space power station that beams power from the sun to earth and other inhabited planets. Donovan and Powell are sent to the space station to test Cutie, the robot. This robot is very advanced and refuses to take orders from human beings. He thinks he is superior because of his intelligence and strength. The robot believes that because of his superiority, a more superior being than humans created him.

Dave, the master robot, has six sub-robots working under him. He seems to suffer from amnesia, violating Rule 2. The robots are not producing any ore, but because of amnesia, they have no explanation for their inactivity. Once again, Powell and Donovan have to deduce to figure out the problem.

Another of the stories is about Herbie, a robot that is able to read minds. Herbie is not interested in human science, but he loves a good fiction book. This robot tells people what they want to hear. For instance, Herbie tells Dr. Calvin that Milton Ashe is in love with her, so she starts to pay more attention to the way she looks, hoping he will court her. The robot also tells Peter Bogert that Albert Lanning has resigned from his position as director of the plant, and he will get the vacant position, which turns out to be a lie. Dr. Calvin is embarrassed to learn of Ashe’s engagement to another woman. She is furious, presenting Herbie with a dilemma that he is incapable of resolving: it hurts to be told the truth, but it also hurts not to be told the truth. This dilemma fries the robot’s brain, rendering him inoperable and useless.

Throughout stories in I, Robot, we see robots becoming more advanced and more like humans. But one of the most interesting stories, is that of Stephen Byerley, a lawyer who is a candidate in a mayoral race. Another candidate accuses Byerley of being a robot, and has him investigated. The results of the investigation uncovers that they have never seen Byerley eat or sleep, so he has to be a robot. To accept him, the lawyer has to violate one of the Three Laws of Robotics. At a high profile event during the campaign, Byerley strikes a heckler, and he gains acceptance because a robot cannot harm a human. But Dr. Calvin suspects that Byerley is indeed a robot, and that the heckler he struck is also a robot, therefore he did not violate any of the Laws of Robotics. I found it fascinating how the characters resolve the issues they face with the robots in the stories.

Published in 1950, I, Robot by Isaac Asimov forces readers to look at how far robotics has come, and how the author’s predictions turned out. Today, machine is becoming more like man, and man is becoming more like machine. Is that something to be scared about?

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

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Personal Library of Wystan Hugh Auden (W H Auden) http://theinvisiblementor.com/personal-library-of-wystan-hugh-auden-w-h-auden/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/personal-library-of-wystan-hugh-auden-w-h-auden/#respond Mon, 10 Nov 2014 11:12:06 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16983 Born on February 21, 1907, Wystan Hugh Auden was one of the world’s best known poet when he died on September 29, 1973. Known as WH Auden, the poet grew up in York, England. He was born into an educated family, his father was a physician and his mother a nurse. Because of their influence, […]

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Wystan Hugh Auden Born on February 21, 1907, Wystan Hugh Auden was one of the world’s best known poet when he died on September 29, 1973. Known as WH Auden, the poet grew up in York, England. He was born into an educated family, his father was a physician and his mother a nurse. Because of their influence, he developed an interest in science and engineering, and coupled with his intelligence, he won a scholarship to Oxford University where he started to write poetry. Although he had a natural intelligence, Auden did not perform very well while he was at Oxford. The poet was friends with other writers and poets such as Stephen Spender, C Day Lewis and Louis MacNeice, whose works were in his personal library. TS Eliot –  essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic – had a profound influence on Auden’s life.  Auden also studied the works of Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud. TS Eliot published Auden’s first major work, “Paid on Both Sides: a Charade” in Criterion in 1930, while he was still at Oxford. Later that year he published his first book length poetry collection.

In 1939, WH Auden moved from England to the US, and later that year when he learned of German occupation in Poland, he wrote the poem, September 1, 1939, which was published in the New Republic. From 1956 to 1961, he was a Professor of Poetry at Oxford. As with the most successful writers and poets, WH Auden wrote about what he knew. For instance, during the Spanish Civil War, he worked as an ambulance driver, and he covered the Communist Revolution in China for newspaper, while he recorded his thoughts and opinions in his poetry. His poems resonated with people because they accurately portrayed the sign of the times – the economic crisis and the rise of fascism. Auden received a Pulitzer Prize in 1948.


The Addictions of Sin: W.H. Auden in His Own Words

BBC documentary, uploaded by allafterall. Click if you cannot view the video.

As I pursue the series on the shaping of a mind by looking into the personal libraries of successful people, my impressions and thoughts are evolving. What is becoming more clear to me, is that while the series is beneficial to people who are interested in self-improvement, for each person who I profile, it is most beneficial to people who are interested in that vocation.  So for instance, if you are  a poet, or thinking of becoming one, the personal library of Auden would be very beneficial to you because you will get insights into the books that shaped his mind. In his library, there are many books of poetry by poets from over the world, and he didn’t spend his time simply reading the works of others, Auden was also writing his own poetry and was able to produce an impressive body of work during his lifetime.

This means, that if you want to become successful at your craft, study the masters, then carve your own path. This post is possible because of Library Thing.

Related Posts:

Jack Layton Personal Library
Marilyn Monroe Personal Library
CS Lewis Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Oscar Wilde Personal Library – The Shaping of a Mind
Emily Dickinson Personal Library
Katharine Hepburn Personal Library
Frederick Douglass Personal Library
The Personal Library of George Washington
The Personal Library of Carl Sandburg
Why read, what to read, and Teddy Roosevelt

Personal Library of Wystan Hugh Auden

  1. Selected Essays, Theodore Spencer
  2. Tonio Kroger and other stories, Thomas Mann
  3. Spy for God: Ordeal of Kurt Gerstein, Pierre Joffroy
  4. The Magic Flute: An Opera in Two Acts. Music by W. A. Mozart. English version after the libretto of Schikaneder and Giesecke, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  5. Young Man Luther: A Study in Psychoanalysis and History (Austen Riggs Monograph), Erik Erikson
  6. The Poems of Catullus (Oxford World’s Classics), Gaius Valerius Catullus
  7. Word – Hoard, Margaret Williams
  8. Windows: Latvian poems;, Ruth Speirs
  9. The Will to Power, Friedrich Nietzsche
  10. Why a Duck?: Visual and Verbal Gems from the Marx Brothers Movies, Richard J Anobile
  11. Walking in the Pennines, Donald Boyd
  12. W. H. Auden : a Selection By the Author, W. H. Auden
  13. W.H. Auden: A memorial address delivered at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford on 27 October, 1973, Stephen Spender
  14. W. H. Auden: A bibliography; the early years through 1955,, B. C Bloomfield
  15. Viking Book of Aphorisms: A Personal Selection, W.H. Auden
  16. Vienna Legend and Reality, Ilsa Barea
  17. Triumphal March (The Ariel poems),  T. S Eliot
  18. Tipoo’s Tiger, Marianne Moore
  19. The Testament of Beauty, a Poem in Four Books, Robert Bridges
  20. Tennyson, Christopher Ricks
  21. Studies in Words (Canto Classics), C. S Lewis
  22. Studies in Iconology: Humanistic Themes in the Art of the Renaissance, Erwin Panofsky
  23. St John of the Cross: His Life and Poetry, Gerald Brenan
  24. Speech and Reality, Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy
  25. Specimens of early English: with introduction, notes, and glossarial index, Richard Morris
  26. Some Poems, J. D. Whitney
  27. WH Auden

    WH Auden

    Silver Poets of the 16th Century (Everyman’s Library), Gerald Bullet

  28. The Life and Work of Sigmund Freud, Ernest Jones
  29. Aphorisms and Letters (Cape Editions), Georg Christoph Lichtenberg
  30. The Artist as Critic: Critical Writings of Oscar Wilde, Oscar Wilde
  31. The Selected Poetry and Prose of Byron, George Gordon – Lord Byron
  32. The Selected Writings of Sydney Smith, Sydney, Smith
  33. Selected Stories, G.K. Chesterton
  34. Selected poems (Selected Poems of Winthrop Mackworth Praed), Winthrop Mackworth Praed
  35. Selected Poems of William Barnes 1800-1886
  36. Joseph Brodsky, Selected Poems, Joseph Brodsky
  37. W.H. Auden’s 1941 Literature Syllabus

    W.H. Auden’s 1941 Literature Syllabus

    Selected Poems, Ondra Lysohorsky

  38. Say the word, Ivor Brown
  39. The Note-Books of Samuel Butler, Samuel Butler
  40. Ruskin Today (A Peregrine Book), John Ruskin
  41. Roumeli: Travels in Northern Greece (New York Review Books Classics), Patrick Leigh Fermor
  42. Rock Crystal: A Christmas Tale, Adalbert Stifter
  43. Rhymes of a PFC, Lincoln Kirstein
  44. Retrospectives and Conclusions, Igor Stravinsky
  45. Igor Stravinsky: The Rake’s Progress, An Opera in Three Acts [Full Score], Igor Stravinsky
  46. The Prelude; Growth of a Poet’s Mind., William Wordsworth
  47. Poetry set in jazz: musical settings by Wallace Southam., Wallace Southam
  48. The Poetical Works of Thomas Moore: Complete in One Volume (Classic Reprint), Thomas Moore
  49. Thomas Hardy: The Complete Poems, Thomas Hardy
  50. Poetical Works of Robert Bridges Excluding the Eight Dramas, Robert Seymour Bridges
  51. The Poetical Works of George Crabbe, Complete in one Volume, George Crabbe
  52. The Poetical Works Of Churchill, Parnell, And Tickell: With A Life Of Each .….., Charles Churchill
  53. Poetic Diction a Study in Meaning, Owen Barfield
  54. The Poems of William Dunbar, William Dunbar
  55. The Complete Poems (Penguin Classics), Christina Rossetti
  56. The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova, Anna Andreevna Akhmatova
  57. Complete Poems and Songs of Robert Burns, Robert Burns
  58. The Collected Poems of Lord Alfred Douglas, Lord Alfred Douglas
  59. The Complete Poems (Penguin Classics), John Milton
  60. Penguin Book of Russian Verse, Dimitri Obolensky
  61. The Penguin Book of Japanese Verse (Penguin Classics), Geoffrey Bownas
  62. The Penguin Book of Chinese Verse, A. R. Davis
  63. My Father and Myself (Nyrb Classics S), J.R. Ackerley
  64. The Gambit Book of Popular Verse, Geoffrey Grigson
  65. Kathleen and Frank, Christopher Isherwood
  66. Letters of Giuseppe Verdi, Charles Osborne
  67. Out of the Picture: A Play in Two Acts, Louis MacNeice
  68. The Odes of Horace, Horace
  69. The Complete Odes and Epodes (Oxford World’s Classics), Horace
  70. Number: The Language of Science, Tobias Dantzig
  71. Njal’s Saga (Njal’s Saga. Translated from the Old Icelandic with Introduction and Notes By Carl F. Bayerschmidt and Lee M. Hollander), Carl F. Bayerschmidt
  72. Njal’s Saga (Classics), Magnus Magnusson
  73. A Nest of Ninnies, John Ashbery
  74. Mythologies, W. B. Yeats
  75. The Collected Poems of W.B. Yeats, W. B. Yeats
  76. My lady Ludlow, and other tales, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell
  77. My Dog Tulip: Movie tie-in edition (New York Review Books Classics), J. R Ackerley
  78. The Moonstone (Dover Thrift Editions), Wilkie Collins
  79. The Mind of the Maker, Dorothy L. Sayers
  80. Man, time, and prophecy, Loren Eisely
  81. The Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkien 4-Book Boxed Set: The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings (Movie Tie-in): The Hobbit, The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King), J. R. R Tolkien
  82. Logical Nonsense, the Works of Lewis Carroll, Now, For the First Time, Complete: With An Introduction, Biography, Notes and a Bibliography, Lewis Carroll
  83. The Living Thoughts of Kierkegaard (New York Review Books), Søren Kierkegaard
  84. Lives of the English Poets : Waller, Milton, Cowley, Samuel Johnson
  85. Life of Rossini, Stendhal
  86. Joy of Chinese Cooking, Doreen Yen Hung Feng
  87. Indian Cooking (Cookery Classics), Savitri Chowdhary
  88. In Memoriam (Norton Critical Editions), Alfred Tennyson
  89. The Human Condition (2nd Edition), Hannah Arendt
  90. A House in Order, Nigel Dennis
  91. The Saga of Grettir the Strong (Penguin Classics), George Ainslie Hight
  92. The Greek Myths (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition), Robert Graves
  93. A Fable (Vintage International), William Faulkner
  94. The Mansion (Vintage International), William Faulkner
  95. The Town (Vintage International), William Faulkner
  96. Good Morning, Midnight, Jean Rhys
  97. Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson (A Harvest book, HB 256), E M Forster
  98. George Bernard Shaw, G. K. Chesterton
  99. Faust I & II (Goethe : The Collected Works, Vol 2), Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  100. Fairy tales and legends (The Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen), H. C. (Hans Christian) Andersen
  101. Aesop’s Fables; a new translation, Aesop
  102. The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (Penguin Classics), Charles Darwin
  103. The Divine Comedy Of Dante Alighieri, The Carlyle-Wicksteed Translation, Dante Alighieri
  104. The Discarded Image: An Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature (Canto Classics), C. S Lewis
  105. A Dictionary of Difficult Words, Robert H Hill
  106. The (Diblos) Notebook, James Merrill
  107. The darkened room, Hilde Spiel
  108. The Crying of Lot 49 (Perennial Fiction Library), Thomas Pynchon
  109. Selected Letters (Oxford World’s Classics), John Keats
  110. Letters of Anton Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov
  111. Goethe: Conversations and Encounters, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  112. Complete Works Of Geoffrey Chaucer, Geoffrey Chaucer
  113. Complete poetry & selected prose with English metrical translations of the Latin, Greek, and Italian poems), John Milton
  114. The Collected Verse of Lewis Carroll, Lewis Carroll
  115. Collected Rhymes and Verses, Walter De la Mare
  116. The Burning Tree: Poems from the First Thousand Years of Welsh Verse, Gwyn Williams
  117. Boy Changed into a Stag: Selected Poems, 1949-67, Ferenc Juhasz
  118. Between the Acts, Virginia Woolf
  119. Awakenings, Oliver Sacks
  120. Ariel (Ariel: The Restored Edition: A Facsimile of Plath’s Manuscript, Reinstating Her Original Selection and Arrangement (P.S.)), Sylvia Plath
  121. The Aeneid (Penguin Classics), Virgil
  122. Adventures of Ideas, Alfred North Whitehead

Random books from W H Auden’s Personal Library

  1. Love, Walter De La Mare
  2. The Complete Immortalia, Harold H Hart
  3. The bassarids (Henze: The Bassarids [Die Bassariden] Opera in 1 Act After Euripides), Hans Werner Henze
  4. The Fall into Time, E. M Cioran
  5. My brother Aquarius: Poems, Stephen Tennant
  6. Salt Gifts, Robert Friend
  7. The poetical works (The Poetical Works 0f Gavin Douglas, Bishop Of Dunkeld: Translation Of Virgil [the Xiii. Bukes Of Eneados Of The Famose Poete Virgill] Notes And Various Readings. Glossary…), Gawin Douglas

Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

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Marty Neumeier’s Rules of Genius http://theinvisiblementor.com/marty-neumeiers-rules-of-genius/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/marty-neumeiers-rules-of-genius/#respond Fri, 07 Nov 2014 11:12:29 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=16974 Marty Neumeier’s Rules of Genius I had the privilege of attending a presentation delivered by Marty Neumeier on the Rules of Genius, which he extracted from his book, The 46 Rules of Genius: An Innovator’s Guide to Creativity (Voices That Matter). The presentation was excellent and gave me much food for thought, so I wanted […]

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Marty Neumeier’s Rules of Genius

I had the privilege of attending a presentation delivered by Marty Neumeier on the Rules of Genius, which he extracted from his book, The 46 Rules of Genius: An Innovator’s Guide to Creativity (Voices That Matter). The presentation was excellent and gave me much food for thought, so I wanted to share the highlights with you.

What is Genius?

“Anyone who turns insights into innovation and in the process changes our view of what is possible.”

Rules of Genius

Marty Neumeier’s Rules of Genius

Marty Neumeier cautioned the audience to become a genius in a small slice of the world. That means that you shouldn’t try to be all things to everyone. He also said that we should learn from what artists do. This is interesting because in the Creative Reading course that I did, which was led by William S. Burroughs, the author of Naked Lunch, he commented that art is 50 years ahead of writing, and what this means to me is that it is important to look at art and art techniques to get a sense of future trends.

One thought provoking point from the Rules of Genius event is that people and machine are taking on each other. People are taking machines into their bodies and machines are becoming more humanlike. Neumeier mentioned robots that are being manufactured in Japan that are very humanlike. In fact, there was a live theater performance and the robots looked so much like humans that the audience didn’t know until the next day when they read about it in the media. This resonated with me because I am reading I, Robot by Isaac Asimov, which was published in 1950. The story is set in 2061, but there are many flashbacks, with robots that can mind read, and those that are so advanced that they refuse to take orders from humans. This makes you wonder if this is the direction that robotics is going.

Nuggets from Rules of Genius

  • It is important to keep on learning.
  • Original work is not “copyable”.
  • Knowledge X Imagination = Originality
  • If you want to be original, you have to invent and build from scratch.
  • Some detriment to innovation:
    • Unexamined beliefs
    • Shop mentality
    • Fear of failure

How to Become a Genius – Marty Neumeier’s Rules of Genius

Marty Neumeier

Marty Neumeier

Rule 25: Learn How to Learn

Find your best way of learning and become an auto-didactic –self-learning and self-teaching. That is what I am doing with my informal liberal arts education. Focus on creative work and up-skill often to prevent yourself from being replaced.

Related Post:

Learning How to Learn http://theinvisiblementor.com/learning-how-to-learn/

Learning to Learn http://theinvisiblementor.com/learning-to-learn/

Rule 26: Start with Curiosity, not Belief

People don’t question enough, start questioning things and do not accept the status quo.

Rule 27: Do Your Own Projects

Something amazing happens when you work on your own projects. I can attest to that! If you work full-time, create projects to work on over the weekend. When you have a sense of purpose, your mind becomes magnetized.

Rule 28: Keep a Hero File

If you see something that you wish you had done, clip the information and store in a file. And whenever you work on a project, make sure you do it as good as the projects in your hero file.

Rule 29: Invest in Your Originality

Producing original work lies at the heart of originality.

Rules of Genius

Originality – Image Credit: The 46 Rules of Genius

Rule 30: Learn Strategically

There is so much to learn, but you will not be able to learn everything. Learn the things you need to learn. This is a tough lesson I learned when I first started my informal liberal arts education.

Rule 31: Shore Up Your Weaknesses

Improve your weaknesses so that they do not hold you back.

Rule 32: Spend Long Hours in the Joy Zone

When learning is fun, you learn faster.

Rule 33: Make Educational Mistakes

Fail big because mistakes are lessons learned. If you do not make any mistakes that means you are not experimenting enough.

Rule 34: Seek Instructive Criticism

Seek feedback from people who can criticize instructively and not constructively.

Rule 35: Fuel Your Passion

Fuel your cycle of learning.

Rule 1: Break the Rules

You are told, often in writing, not to break the rules until you understand them, and on the other hand, you also hear that there are no rules. Which is correct? This dilemma is called the Genius Paradox, which Marty Neumeier deals with in his book, The 46 Rules of Genius.

Rule 46: Make New Rules

The first Rule is to break the rules and the last rule is to replace them with your Rules.

These are some of the rules discussed in The 46 Rules of Genius: An Innovator’s Guide to Creativity (Voices That Matter) by Marty Neumeier. Liked this post? Share it on social media and leave a comment as well as subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more! If you’re new to the blog, visit the Start Here page for my pillar posts.

Author Bio: Avil Beckford, an expert interviewer, entrepreneur and published author is passionate about books and professional development, and that’s why she founded The Invisible Mentor and the Virtual Literary World Tour to give you your ideal mentors virtually in the palm of your hands by offering book reviews and book summaries, biographies of wise people and interviews of successful people. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter.

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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