The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com You're Never Alone Fri, 01 May 2015 17:13:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.1 How to Make Professional Development a Part of Your Day at Any Age http://theinvisiblementor.com/how-to-make-professional-development-a-part-of-your-day-at-any-age/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/how-to-make-professional-development-a-part-of-your-day-at-any-age/#respond Fri, 01 May 2015 07:30:47 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17909

How to Make Professional Development a Part of Your Day at Any Age

How to Make Professional Development a Part of Your Day
How to Make Professional Development a Part of Your Day at Any Age

You already have an over-scheduled day, and you always seem to be playing catch-up with your work, so how will you find time to make professional development a part of your day? The reality is that with the unprecedented rate of change, things will not slow down, and you will always be playing catch-up until you make adjustments in your life. Professional development is no longer something that is nice to do, it is something that you have to do so that you do not fall behind. I love learning, and professional development is not always easy because life gets in the way. For example, I launched The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, and I had specific books to read, everything was carefully planned, when tragedy struck and my brother died while on vacation. Although I found it difficult to read the books that I had planned to read, I was still reading because it is something that I enjoy doing so I make time for it. It took what seems like forever to get back on track. I fell off the bandwagon and now I am getting back on.

Related Post

The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge

I started off the process to get back on track by reading children’s books that I should have read when I was a child, but hadn’t. And there are a few children’s books on my list of books to read this year, so I am reading them first. The reason that I am writing this is to demonstrate that you can develop professionally by engaging in activities that you enjoy. But you have to also engage in learning activities that will allow you to perform your work more effectively. Look at where you are at today, what are things that you can do to perform your work more efficiently? Are there any pressing issues plaguing your organization and even industry, and how can you be an answer to the issue? What knowledge can you acquire that will make influencers and people of power in your workplace stop and take notice of you? What books should you be reading? What courses can you take? And never use your age as an excuse because anyone can make professional development a part of her day.

How to Make Professional Development a Part of Your Day at Any Age
How to Make Professional Development a Part of Your Day at Any Age

Collaboration is big these days, and you can accomplish more in your life if you joined forces with other like-minded people who have similar professional development goals. Who are people in your circle who you can team up with to accelerate your professional development. One way you can collaborate with co-workers is to form a workplace book club, reading books that will have an impact on the industry and your role. Instead of each member reading the same book, divide the books among each member, who is then responsible for reading the books assigned, taking careful notes, then teaching what she has learned. Meet once or twice a month, but make sure that you are consistent with meeting frequency and dates, and build it into your schedule. If you are unsure of which books to read, talk to your superior, and also visit or call your public library and find out from a librarian.

Related Posts

Taking Better Notes – Learning to Abbreviate Words 
To Remember More of What You Read, Take Notes by Hand
Tips on Note-taking: The Art of Writing While Listening

Collaboration is important, but there are still things that you can do by yourself. Schedule time first thing in the morning to take an online course. There are many that you can take that won’t cost you a dime. Even if you are part of a workplace book club, reading is also a solitary activity, so schedule time each day to read. And simply reading is not enough, by practice, you can develop the habit of connecting the ideas from the books you read, and that’s where you will receive the true benefits of your professional development endeavors. These are some of the ways you can make professional development a part of your day at any age.

Related Post

Speed Reading: Collection of Articles to Help You Read Faster 
Free Online University Courses

I am officially re-launching the Reading Challenge in May, so I invite you to join me so you’re never alone on your professional development journey. Confucius summed up the importance of learning.

“Learning without thinking is useless. Thinking without learning is dangerous.

He who keeps on reviewing his old and new knowledge may become a teacher of others.

Confucius said, “Those who are born with the possession of knowledge are the highest class of men. Those who learn, and so readily get possession of knowledge, are the next. Those who are dull and stupid, and yet compass the learning, are another class next to these. As to those who are dull and stupid and yet do not learn; they are the lowest of the people.”

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carre, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/the-spy-who-came-in-from-the-cold-by-john-le-carre-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/the-spy-who-came-in-from-the-cold-by-john-le-carre-book-review/#respond Tue, 28 Apr 2015 14:23:11 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17905

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carre, Book Review

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carre
The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John Le Carre, Book Review

First published in 1963, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold: A George Smiley Novel (George Smiley Novels) by John Le Carré is often found on the list of must-read books, and has been a constant best seller. John Le Carré was an intelligence officer before he became a writer, however, he swears that the story is not based on any of his experiences. He wrote The Spy Who Came in from the Cold before he left the service and received permission before he could publish his book. The book, set during the Cold War (The Cold War: 1947 – 1953), demonstrates the chilling horror of espionage that took place during that period. The book also shows the battle between nations to come out on top and the lengths they will go to, to win, in the spy business.

In a 1997 Paris Review (Paris Review 39.143 (Summer 1997): p50-74) interview with John Le Carré, when the author is asked about the germination of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold:

“At that time I was very caught up in the cold war in Germany. I was stationed in Bonn, going to Berlin a lot, and that was the crucible of all that spy commerce in those days. One of my jobs at the embassy, one of my day jobs, you might say, was bringing over German dignitaries, introducing them to British politicians, and functioning as interpreter. I was sitting alone in London Airport, minding my own business, when a very rough-edged, kind of Trevor Howard figure, walked in and sat himself at the bar beside me. He fished in his pocket, put down a great handful of change in heaven-knows-which currencies and denominations, and then said, “A large scotch.” Between him and the barman, they just sorted out the money. He drank the scotch and left. I thought I picked up a very slight Irish accent. And that was really all, but there was a deadness in the face, and he looked, as we would have said in the spy world in those days, as if he’d had the hell posted out of him. It was the embodiment, suddenly, of somebody that I’d been looking for. It was he, and I never spoke to him, but he was my guy, Alec Leamas, and I knew he was going to die at the Berlin Wall.”

There are many characters in the book to keep track of, and it is interesting that on the book’s cover, it says a George Smiley novel, yet the reader could easily discount his involvement in the story. As far as I am concerned, George Smiley is the puppet master, who is pulling the strings in the background, outside of the view of others. And though he may seem minor, he is pulling the important strings. This book upset me, and I am not sure it is the kind of book that I should be reading when I am grieving. The end of the book really upsetting to me, and I wonder, what really is the point to go through so much, and in the end lose? It’s also amazing that John Le Carre, wrote this book that placed him on the map, in only five weeks.

The story is centered on Alec Leamas, and I do not know if I am judging him too harshly, but he strikes me as not being very good at his job as an intelligence officer. And it takes him too long to figure things out. Alec Leamas is the Head of the Berlin Station, and when the story starts off, he is waiting for his last agent, Karl Riemeck to show up. But before Riemeck reaches him in west Germany, Hans-Dieter Mundt, Deputy Director of the East German Intelligence Service has him shot.

Leamas returns to London, feeling like a failure, facing the prospect of a desk job, or even forced early retirement at the tender age of 50 years old. Control, the chief of the Circus, presents Leamas with a unique opportunity to exact revenge on Mundt. The intelligence officer grabs the opportunity and the story takes off. The frightening thing about the book is in the world that the story takes place, human life is not valued, and others play on your weaknesses. For instance, Mundt’s subordinate, Fieldler, who dislikes his boss tremendously, is used as a pawn in the game to discredit his boss. Fieldler suspects that his boss is a double agent so he accepts certain intelligence as facts, without enough due diligence. Things are seldom what they seem, so question everything.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold: A George Smiley Novel (George Smiley Novels) by John Le Carre is one of those books you have to read for yourself to understand the intricate plot. Alec Leamas realizes too late what Control’s real mission is, and he dies at the Wall because he gets conscience in the end. In a country, they espouse certain values, which are often at odds with the spying business.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah by Richard Bach, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/illusions-the-adventures-of-a-reluctant-messiah-by-richard-bach/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/illusions-the-adventures-of-a-reluctant-messiah-by-richard-bach/#respond Mon, 27 Apr 2015 14:28:04 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17899

Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah by Richard Bach

Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant MessiahIllusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah by Richard Bach follows his bestselling Jonathan Livingston Seagull, which I loved. I can’t say the same thing about this book, and let’s get my bias out of the way, I detest books where you have a “sage” trying to show you your errant ways, directing you to the proper path. Or it could be my introverted self, speaking, getting annoyed at the notion of some well-meaning person forcing you to speak, when you do not want to. I love learning, and I am open to learn from others, but it has to be done in a certain way, and the way it is done in this book, would most certainly irritate me.

Now that I have gotten that off my chest, Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah by Richard Bach is very philosophical, and the author uses his flying experiences as a basis for this very imaginative work of fiction. The story is about Richard Bach’s imagined encounter with Donald P. Shimoda, a self-proclaimed messiah. Shimoda pretty much likens himself to Jesus the Messiah in the Bible, performing many miracles. People can touch him and be healed, he walks on water, crowds of people flock to him, and someone shoots (crucifies) him for his beliefs and he rises again. Shimoda gets tired of this way of living, so he quits his lifestyle as a religious leader, reinventing himself as a barnstormer, who travels across the United States, selling 10-minute helicopter rides for $3.00. Shimoda’s aircraft of choice is a gold and white Travel Air 4000 biplane.

Richard Bach is a disillusioned writer, and a barnstormer, also selling 10-minute helicopter rides for $3.00. One summer day, while flying his biplane just north of Ferris, Illinois, Richard Bach sees an old Travel Air 4000, so he touches down, and meets Shimoda for the very first time. The two enter into a student-teacher relationship, where the former messiah is the teacher. Shimoda gives Bach the Messiah’s Handbook, a book full of wisdom, and it is special because there are no page numbers, and whenever you open it, the book opens to the page you need the most.

Wisdom from the Messiah Handbook includes:

Learning is finding out what you already know. Doing is demonstrating that you know it.

Your only obligation in any lifetime is to be true to yourself.

You teach best what you need most to learn.

You are never given a wish without also being given the power to make it true. You may have to work for it, however.

The world is your exercise-book, the pages on which you do your sums.  It is not reality, although you can express reality there if you wish.

Every person, all the events of your life are there because you have drawn them there.

Here is a test to find whether your mission on earth is finished: If you’re alive, it isn’t.

In Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah, Shimoda and Bach travel across America, giving biplane rides. The former messiah dispenses his wisdom, teaches Bach how to perform miracles, and to reflect more deeply on the meaning of life. The book explains that the world that we live in is an illusion, the things we think are real, are not, and so is the underlying reality behind it. After all the teaching Bach receives, he concludes that each of us have to focus on our own spiritual quest, allowing others to attain their own enlightenment. We are also responsible for our own happiness. After this, Bach becomes a self-proclaimed messiah.

Although I think that Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah by Richard Bach is fantastical, according to Wikipedia, “A number of personal development teachers have cited “Illusions” as a major influence on their life path, including Dr. Joe Vitale, Bob Doyle, Brad Yates and Mike Dooley.”

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/the-bridges-of-madison-county-by-robert-james-waller-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/the-bridges-of-madison-county-by-robert-james-waller-book-review/#respond Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:17:44 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17894

The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller, Book Review

The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller
The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller, Book Review

When you open up The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller, there is a section called The Beginning, and as I was reading, I thought it was a true story, or a dramatization of a true story, but that is not the case. It is a work of fiction published in 1992, which achieved bestselling status, selling over 50 million copies. There are times when I wonder if something is wrong with me because you have these mega bestselling books, but when I read them, my reaction is ambivalent at best. I read The Bridges of Madison County because it was on my brother’s bookshelf, and it is a way for me to remember him. But I suppose when you think about it, people like the story because it’s about forbidden love.

Michael Johnson and his sister, Carolyn, contact a writer to schedule a meeting. At the meeting, they tell him about their mother’s relationship with Robert Kinkaid, writer and photographer. They show him Francesca’s journals, news clippings, photos and other information. The writer is intrigued by what he hears and sees, and agree to write the story. Michael and Carolyn find out about their mother’s love affair after her death, by reading through her stuff, and the letter she writes to them with an explanation. They discover that their mother had one true love that wasn’t their father, and that she sacrificed pursuing her love for Robert Kinkaid, out of duty and responsibility to them and her husband Richard.

Back in the summer of 1965, nearly 25 years earlier, Robert Kinkaid gets an assignment from National Geographic to photograph seven covered bridges in Madison County. Although Madison County is far away from Bellingham, Washington, the photographer decides to drive his truck, Harry. For a photographer, this is an excellent way to discover treasures worth capturing with film. When he arrives in Madison County, he asks someone at the gas station for directions to the seven covered bridges, and Robert easily finds six of them, but is having a difficult time locating Roseman Bridge. He has a policy that he will ask three times for directions, but in this case, he thinks that twice will be enough.

Robert comes across a farm and decides to drive in to get directions, and this is the first time he meets Francesca Johnson. When he sees her, something stirs inside of him. She walks out to him barefoot, to find out what he needs, and not only does she give him the instructions to get to the seventh bridge, but offers to show him where it is. Being this forward is not Francesca’s usual behavior. When they get to the covered bridge, Robert scopes it out to determine where he’ll get the best shots the next morning. He drives Francesca home and she invites him into her home for a cool drink. That week, her family is away at the Illinois State Fair so Carolyn can exhibit her steer.

As the story unfolds, we learn that Francesca is lonely and feeling somewhat neglected. She is in a too comfortable place in her marriage, which can be very problematic for marriages. Her husband is resistant to change, killing the light inside of her slowly. Hailing from Naples to Madison County, her life changed radically, with many unrealized dreams. Robert unleashes the fire and passion within this lonely housewife. It is a pleasure for her to speak to the photographer about cultural things, not topics for discussion in Madison County.

Both Robert and Francesca feel the tug of attraction. After having supper, drinking brandy, and much conversation, he leaves for his motel. After thinking about it, the lonely housewife wants to see the intriguing photographer again, so she drives to Roseman Bridge, and tacks on a message hoping that he will see it. In the message, Francesca invites Robert to dinner again. Next morning, through the viewfinder, he spots the white paper, which he removes and places into his pocket, focusing on capturing the scenes before him while the light is right. Later he reads the note, calling Francesca to accept the dinner invitation. The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller covers the four days that Robert Kinkaid and Francesca Johnson share. The two realize that each is what the other is looking for, but in the end, Francesca decides that she has to sacrifice her love and happiness for her family, and she does so for practical reasons such as not wanting to hurt them or making them the laughing stock in the area because she goes off with the long-haired photographer – the hippie.

In the novel, there is a lot of information about photography, equipment, and setting up shots and that can be expected because one of the main characters is a photographer. After Richard dies, at one point, Francesca tries to find Robert, but none of his contact details work. She gets a letter from his lawyer when he dies, and he will the few things that mattered the most to him. On her birthday each year, Francesca reads the one letter she received from Robert, with a captivating photo he took of her, and that’s a ritual for her. When she dies, Michael and Carolyn read the letter their mother leaves for them. It’s quite poignant how the two children drink the last of the brandy that Francesca shared with Robert nearly 25 years before.

The Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller is a nice story if you like that sort of thing, but I am feeling ambivalent and cannot say if I enjoyed the book. We all have longings, and I think the book is popular because the story gives voice to those longings.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read the post, The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join our Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Source of covered bridge is Pixabay!

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The Invisible Mentor 5-Stage Model Expanded http://theinvisiblementor.com/the-invisible-mentor-5-stage-model-expanded/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/the-invisible-mentor-5-stage-model-expanded/#respond Thu, 23 Apr 2015 16:46:45 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17888

The Invisible Mentor 5-Stage Model Expanded

Invisible Mentor
The Invisible Mentor 5-Stage Model Expanded

Yesterday, I introduced The Invisible Mentor 5-Stage Model, and today in the final instalment in the series, I will expand it, to give you a clearer idea what it is about. The model is a professional development system, and for it to work for you, you have to devote the time. As some may know, last year, I embarked on an informal liberal arts education, where I took a number of courses online. Of the courses that I took, only one I paid for, and I bought it when it was 75 percent off. I spent considerable time choosing my courses, but I made a critical mistake, which is a pattern that I noticed in my life, is that I chose courses that interest me. There is nothing wrong with that if you are independently wealthy, but most of us are not in such a position.

Instead, what I should have done, was to choose courses that made me better at my craft, so in my situation, most of the courses I selected should have been writing courses. When I recognized what I was doing wrong, I took several writing courses, and a grammar course. About the same, I had been feeling like a fraud, like I didn’t know what I was doing, and I am sure that some of you can relate to those feelings. When I decided to reflect on my feelings and unpack everything, I discovered that I believed that there were gaps in my skills. A few years before, one friend told me that my writing was sterile, and another said that my writing was hokey, and I didn’t realize what a negative impact those words had on me, and they helped to erode my confidence as a writer. Many people whom I have interviewed, would have decided to prove those naysayers wrong. But at the time, the words did damage. I cannot control what people say, but I can control how I respond to what others say to me.

Related Posts

Evolution of The Invisible Mentor 

5 Stages of the Invisible Mentor Model

The 5-Stage Invisible Mentor Learning Model

  1. Stage One: Identify Your Goal
  2. Stage Two: The BIG WHY – Mentoring Needs Assessment
  3. Stage Three: Get Organized
  4. Stage Four: Get Started – It’s Time to Learn
  5. Stage Five: Journey to Excellence

Getting Started: 

  1. Identify a personal or professional learning goal where mentoring would provide you with value.
  2. Choose unique leaders (Mentors) whose expertise and life achievement align with your learning goals. But how do you choose the right mentor?
  3. Select tools and resources that will empower you to reach identified or stated learning goals.

Stage One: Identify Your Goal

  1. Narrow your goal:

What do you want to change?

What do you want to achieve?

What do you want to learn?

To achieve excellence in your personal and professional life, what changes would you have to make, and what assistance do you require?

Stage Two: The BIG WHY – Mentoring Needs Assessment

  1. Based on the responses to questions in Stage One, how might you benefit from invisible mentors? What issues or problems can invisible mentors help with? What knowledge, skills, and abilities do you need to acquire?

 List the issues or problems that you want to resolve

  1.  Think about your professional goals, what gaps exist between where you are now, and where you would like to go in the next three years?

 List the gaps that you have identified

  1.  What knowledge do you need to fill those gaps?

 Write down the knowledge that you wish to acquire

  1.  What actions do you have to take to fill those gaps?

 Write down the specific actions in detail

  1.  Which experts, books, and courses can help you to bridge the skills gap?

Write down the information in detail

 Related Post

Mentor Yourself: DIY Mentoring Program (You can find a mini mentoring needs assessment)

View Start With Why – Simon Sinek TED talk YouTube Video

If you cannot view the video, you can watch it here.

Stage Three: Get Organized 

  1. Look at all the information collected so far – streamline it:

List three learning goals that invisible mentors will solve. In other words, what three things do you need to know?

Prioritize the three learning goals.

Plan to achieve your learning goals.

Determine the number of hours each day or week to invest to achieve your learning goals.

Schedule learning time – what is scheduled gets done.

Stage Four: Get Started – It’s Time to Learn 

  1. Start taking the courses and reading the books that you selected. And start to talk to the experts.

Take excellent notes.

What are 5 key ideas from each course, book, and interview?

Receive the ideas: Listen to what the instructor is saying in the course, then write down five of the ideas that resonate. What are the experts telling you? What are you learning from the books you read?

Expand the ideas: Choose one of the five ideas to build on.

Apply the ideas: What projects are you working on where you can apply the one idea?

  1. Look for relationships between the courses, informational interview with experts, and the books you read.
  2. Look at the courses, interviews and books all as one. What are the key lessons learned that you can apply to your work?

Related Posts

Taking Better Notes – Learning to Abbreviate Words 

To Remember More of What You Read, Take Notes by Hand

Tips on Note-taking: The Art of Writing While Listening

Stage Five: Is It Working? Track Your Progress – The Outcome 

  1. Record in detail what you have learned and how it has helped you in your career and life.
  2. Have you resolved your initial issues or problems? If not, what aspects have not been resolved? Do you need to revisit another section of the model such as choosing different invisible mentors?
  3. Have you achieved your invisible mentoring goals?

Although the process worked for me, it is still a work in process, and when it is as refined as I would like it to be, I will get it developed into an app. One of the things I have to do is to read Simon Sinek’s book, Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action. Test the model and let me know what you think. You could start off with one course, interview and book, and see how they help you to bridge any skills gap.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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5 Stages of the Invisible Mentor Model http://theinvisiblementor.com/5-stages-of-the-invisible-mentor-model/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/5-stages-of-the-invisible-mentor-model/#respond Wed, 22 Apr 2015 14:27:18 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17878

5 Stages of the Invisible Mentor Model

Why Invisible Mentors?

Invisible Mentor
5 Stages of the Invisible Mentor Model

The ideas, examples and achievements of personally aligned role models can provide you with inspiration and stimulation that helps you refine and achieve your goals. That’s one of the reasons why readers love the invisible mentor interviews.

Through articles, interviews, books, videos, podcasts, blogs and courses, the advice of successful and accomplished people is shared with you. Ongoing exposure to the works of effective practitioners will help you exercise critical thinking, support the discovery of information about your own abilities, and allow you to formulate theories and strategies.

Additionally, when you connect the ideas from the various types of information you digest, even when they may seem like disparate pieces of information, magic happens. Enhanced strategic thinking and awareness will inspire you to become more innovative and help you uncover creative, effective solutions to professional and personal challenges.

Definition of an Invisible Mentor

In yesterday’s blog post, Evolution of an Invisible Mentor, we looked at definitions of invisible mentor that I found online. And I particularly liked the one developed by Gonzaga University.

An invisible mentor is a role model [who] exhibits positive behaviors, attitudes and values. The invisible mentor may personify a potential future to the protégé or provide an example of how to achieve various career milestones. This type of mentor may not even be aware that she/he is mentoring.” Gonzaga University 

An invisible mentor is a unique leader you can learn things from by observing them from a distance.” Version 1.0 – Avil Beckford

After my latest research on invisible mentoring, and working through the invisible mentor model last summer, I believe it is time to update the definition of an invisible mentor to make it more encompassing.

An invisible mentor is an accomplished leader whose positive traits, behaviors, and values you emulate by observing and digesting content by and about them, learning from their expertise and experiences to help you better manage and navigate your career.” Version 2.0, Avil Beckford

Getting Started: 

  1. Identify a personal or professional learning goal where mentoring would provide you with value.
  2. Choose unique leaders (Mentors) whose expertise and life achievement align with your learning goals. But how do you choose the right mentor?
  3. Select tools and resources that will empower you to reach identified or stated learning goals.

Is Invisible Mentoring for You? 

This model works best if you are a motivated, independent learner willing to commit at least three hours per week for a 6-month to 2-year period.  Accommodating individual preferences, the program is flexible and allows customization and selection of relevant sections from each stage. Three hours of undisturbed time are desirable, but unrealistic for some people. Think of interstitial learning – learning accomplished during periods of free time.

The 5-Stage Invisible Mentor Learning Model

  1. Stage One: Identify Your Goal
  2. Stage Two: The BIG WHY – Mentoring Needs Assessment
  3. Stage Three: Get Organized
  4. Stage Four: Get Started – It’s Time to Learn
  5. Stage Five: Journey to Excellence

In the next instalment of the series, we will unpack each stage of the invisible mentor learning model.

Related Posts

Evolution of an Invisible Mentor
Adventures in Learning: DIY Mentoring Program, Episode One
Adventures in Learning: DIY Mentoring Program, Episode Two
Adventures in Learning: DIY Mentoring Program, Episode Three

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Evolution of The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com/evolution-of-the-invisible-mentor/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/evolution-of-the-invisible-mentor/#respond Tue, 21 Apr 2015 15:24:28 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17874

Evolution of The Invisible Mentor

invisible mentorFor those who do not know the story, in the fall of 2007, while going for a morning walk in High Park, I was wondering how to market my book, Tales of People Who Get It. Suddenly, your book is your board of invisible mentors popped into my consciousness. This was an epiphany for me because my book is based on interviews of highly successful people, and whenever I faced a problem, I often remembered parts of interviews that I had conducted. I was so excited that I told a friend about the experience, and she replied that it was brilliant, but I should get rid of the word “invisible.” She felt that the idea was ahead of its time. This didn’t work for me, because I thought the word “invisible” was a key component of the phrase. I stopped dead in my track and didn’t pursue the idea for 18 months.

Have you ever been in a situation where you didn’t explore your ideas because of what others said? If you answered ‘yes,’ you can relate to how I felt at the time.

I conducted research on invisible mentors and discovered Invisible Mentor: Communication Theory and Lilian Katz by Karen L. Peterson.  Someone also recommended that I read Marsha Sinetar’s The Mentor’s Spirit. After reading the books and devouring Peterson’s paper, I defined invisible mentors as unique leaders you can learn from by observing them from a distance. And The invisible Mentor blog was BORN. Over the years, as I have played with the idea of an invisible mentor, and refined it to become more relevant to others. My website of the same name, is a self-development tool for professionals to mentor themselves, using the content I provide – interviews with highly accomplished people, book reviews, mini biographies, and tips and resources.

Sometimes I feel like I am whistling in the dark, and want to throw in the towel, because I feel that I am not making a difference, or providing a useful service, when someone sends me an email to thank me for the work that I am doing. Recently, while I was in New York, shortly after my brother died, my niece and I were having a very candid conversation, when she told me that she enjoys the invisible mentor interviews that I conduct. Camile has been transcribing the interviews for me. She told me that in one of the interviews, the interviewee was talking about managing her career, when she realized that 10 years into her career, she hasn’t managed it. If she feels this way, there are countless others who feel the same way. In fact, recently in a meeting with a senior financial executive, she indicated that many women have said the same thing, but at the same time, if you work for a company where you have the opportunity to move around, not intentionally managing your career doesn’t have to be a negative. Sheryl Sandberg describes her career as a jungle gym scramble.

With this information, what can I do to become more relevant to serve those who are feeling rudderless in their careers? My immediate response is to transform the invisible mentor into more of a system. It occurred to me to write a blog post on the evolution of the invisible mentor, but I realize that it has to be a series. Five years after creating my blog, I conduct research once again on invisible mentors and there are a lot more search results today.

“An invisible mentor is a role model [who] exhibits positive behaviors, attitudes and values. The invisible mentor may personify a potential future to the protégé or provide an example of how to achieve various career milestones. This type of mentor may not even be aware that she/he is mentoring.” Gonzaga University 

“What is invisible mentoring?

  • Focused attention on students identified as at-risk of failure or alienation.
  • A feasible plan for reaching out to those who are “quiet, unpopular, or most likely to fail.””

Invisible Mentoring: Keeping All Students Connected by Christina Whirty, Sally Starker, Cyndi Bengston, and Mike Dye

bannerAs you may notice, the idea of the invisible mentor is being used in education, and also to help students who are likely to fail. I am using it in the business realm. The other thing I noticed with the invisible mentor search results, which is new to me, is that I can choose someone to invisible mentor, without letting him or her know. Before, I thought that people choose their invisible mentors to emulate. But, it works both ways. However, on the invisible mentor blog, I offer the information to you, and it is up to you, whether you decide to accept it, using it to mentor yourself.  My tagline is that you’re never alone, so I think that there is a need for what I am doing, but to be more effective, and have more impact, I need to focus what I am offering. This will not be an easy endeavor, but I am in for the long haul.

I intentionally conducted an experiment on invisible mentoring while I was creating the invisible mentor model, and I identified several gaps, which I have to bridge, to make the model work more smoothly. In doing that, I will have a better product to offer. In the next instalment of the evolution of the invisible mentor, I will talk more about my experience of invisible mentoring, and how it can assist others.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/bridge-to-terabithia-by-katherine-paterson-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/bridge-to-terabithia-by-katherine-paterson-book-review/#respond Mon, 20 Apr 2015 06:15:03 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17862

Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson, Book Review

Bridge to TerabithiaKatherine Paterson was inspired to write Bridge to Terabithia when her son’s close friend was killed by lightning. Published in 1977, Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson is a children’s book about the friendship between Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke. Nine year old Leslie is an only child and 10 year old Jess is one of five children and the middle child. Jess is feeling neglected as the middle child and doing too many chores in the household because his two older sisters are skilled at getting out of performing chores and his two younger sisters, May Belle who is six years old and Joyce Anne who is four are considered to be too young to help out around the home.  The father works very hard, so when he returns home from his long commute from DC, he is too tired and doesn’t pay any attention to Jess. The young boy is feeling like he doesn’t have enough time for himself, and wants a quiet place where he can draw.

When the story starts, it is the summer and Jess is training because he wants to be the fastest runner in fifth grade at Lark Creek Elementary School. For one day, on April 22nd, when he was in fourth grade, he won and was the hero at his school for a day. Each morning, before Jess does his chores, he runs across the meadows of his family’s small farm in rural Virginia – outside of Washington DC. One morning while he is racing he notices someone sitting on a fence, but because of the way the person is dressed, and the hairstyle, he has a hard time figuring out if it’s a girl or a boy, and that’s the first time he sees Leslie. Jess craves his father’s attention, and it is hope that if he becomes the fastest runner, his father will become proud of him. Leslie’s family recently moved into the old Perkins place, next to their farm.

When school opens after the summer holidays, the running resumes during recess, and Jess is confident that he is the fastest runner because he has been training so much. Leslie wants to participate, but the other boys do not want to allow her because she is a girl. Jess stands up for her and she ends up running faster than all the boys, including Jess, for the entire week, so that’s the end of running because which boy wants to lose a race against a girl? The other children at Lark Creek Elementary do not like Leslie because she looks, dresses and behaves differently from them.

Leslie and Jess develop a friendship, and you see the lad transforming into who he might become. Leslie likes him for who he is and doesn’t judge him. Jess’ father does not approve of his artistic abilities, though he is quite good, but his music teacher, Miss Edmunds, encourages him to continue drawing. Leslie and Jess find a secret place, between both properties, where they create an imaginary Kingdom that they name Terabithia, and the two become king and queen. Leslie opens up a new world for him, also telling him about the books she read such as Narnia. Jess’ self-confidence starts to soar, running is no longer important to him because he has something to look forward to – Terabithia. For Christmas, Jess sees a sign for free puppies and gets one for Leslie’s present, while she gets him a paint set. They name the puppy Prince Terrien.

One day, Miss Edmunds takes Jess to some of the museums in DC, but he doesn’t get permission from his parents to go. When he returns home, he realizes that something is very wrong, and he learns that Leslie died while he was out. The parents think that he too had died. Jess doesn’t believe that Leslie is dead, but the good thing is that his father is there for him during this very difficult time. In honor of Leslie, who was more like an extension of himself, he makes the trek to Terabithia to hold a ceremony in her honor.

“”It’s a sign from the Spirits,” Jess said quietly. “We made a worthy offering.”

He walked slowly, as part of a great procession, though only the puppy could be seen, slowly forward carrying the queen’s wreath to the sacred grove. He forced himself deep into the dark center of the grove and, kneeling, laid the wreath upon the thick carpet of golden needles.

“Father, into Thy hands I commend her spirit.” He knew Leslie would have liked those words. They had the ring of the sacred grove in them.

The solemn procession wound its way through the sacred grove homeward to the castle.

Like a single bird across a stormcloud sky, a tiny peace winged its way through the chaos inside his body.”

He also uses the lumber he received from Leslie’s parents to build a bridge to Terabithia. May Belle follows him to see where he is going and he carefully leads her to meet the imaginary people of Terabithia.

Although Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson is a children’s book, it demonstrates the power that friends have over each other. It’s often been said that you are the sum total of the five people closest to you, who are you spending your time with? I recommend Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-3-women-of-the-bible/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-3-women-of-the-bible/#respond Thu, 16 Apr 2015 07:59:49 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17852

Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible

Women of the Bible
Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible

In the last instalment in the series, Women of the Bible, we will briefly look at the lives of Esther, Mary Magdalene and Delilah. This post is not about religion or the Bible, but a look at some prominent women of the Bible.

Related Posts

Post Women’s History Month: Ruth – Women of the Bible 
Post Women’s History Month: Jezebel – Women of the Bible 

Esther: Do you play it safe, or risk your personal safety, standing up for what’s right? But what is the right thing to do? That’s a tough question, one that most of us ponder from time-to-time. The answer depends on the situation that you find yourself in. Queen Esther is married to King Xerxes, King of the Medes and Persians. His Chief Officer of the State, Haman, plans to kill all the Jews in Persia. Haman doesn’t like Mordecai, Esther’s uncle, and wants revenge. Haman is quite sneaky, to get back at Mordecai, he tells the king that some of the subjects defy his edicts – they won’t bow down to him. Haman knows the king very well, so he knows which weaknesses to exploit to get what he wants.

Mordecai is pressuring Esther to talk to the King about Haman’s planned genocide, but she is fearful for her life. Mordecai tells Esther that even though she is a part of the King’s household, doesn’t mean that she is safe if the planned massacre goes ahead. Now, King Xerxes is not known for his benevolence, and in fact, if anyone has the audacity to speak to him, without his expressed permission, could be killed. And wives are not exempted from this rule. What would you advise Queen Esther to do? Remember, it is a time very different from today, where women didn’t have the many rights and freedoms they have today.

At first, Esther refuses to grant Mordecai his request, but the more she thinks about the situation, the more she realizes that the right thing to do is to risk her personal safety, to speak to her husband. Before she takes the plunge, she asks the Jews in the kingdom to go on a 3-day fast with her, and she decides that if she perishes, so be it. After the fast, she adorns herself in her royal robes, then positions herself in front of the king’s hall. King Xerxes sees her, extends his gold scepter to indicate that she can approach him. She does so, touching the tip of the scepter.

“3 Then the king asked, “What is it, Queen Esther? What is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be given you.”

4 “If it pleases the king,” replied Esther, “let the king, together with Haman, come today to a banquet I have prepared for him.”

5 “Bring Haman at once,” the king said, “so that we may do what Esther asks.”

So the king and Haman went to the banquet Esther had prepared. 6 As they were drinking wine, the king again asked Esther, “Now what is your petition? It will be given you. And what is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be granted.”

7 Esther replied, “My petition and my request is this: 8 If the king regards me with favor and if it pleases the king to grant my petition and fulfill my request, let the king and Haman come tomorrow to the banquet I will prepare for them. Then I will answer the king’s question.”” Esther 5 v 3-8 New International Version

As you can see from the above Bible passage, Queen Esther does not just blurt out what she wants from the king, she knows that she has to be strategic to beat Haman at his game. She knows her opponent, therefore, she develops a strategy to win the game, hence, the scene has to be perfect, and to her, a banquet is the perfect place to execute her strategy.

At the banquet, King Xerxes asks Esther about her request, and she sets up Haman’s downfall perfectly.

“3 “If I have found favor with you, Your Majesty, and if it pleases you, grant me my life—this is my petition. And spare my people—this is my request. 4 For I and my people have been sold to be destroyed, killed and annihilated. If we had merely been sold as male and female slaves, I would have kept quiet, because no such distress would justify disturbing the king.”

5 King Xerxes asked Queen Esther, “Who is he? Where is he—the man who has dared to do such a thing?”

6 Esther said, “An adversary and enemy! This vile Haman!”” Esther 7 v 3-6 New International Version

What happens next? Haman is hanged on the gallows he prepared for Mordecai?

The big lessons in the story are to treat all people with respect; think carefully and plan your response to situations; and study your opponents, so you know how to respond effectively to impending threats.

Mary Magdalene: Mary Magdalene is considered to be one of Jesus’ closest companions, and was one of his devoted disciples. Their relationship was so close that she is the first person that Jesus appears to, after his resurrection, and he tells Mary Magdalene to spread the word. In the Bible, there are countless nameless women, so it is surprising that Mary Magdalene is mentioned over 12 times in the Gospels. It is worth noting that there is a rumor floating around that Mary Magdalene had an intimate relationship with Jesus, but some Biblical scholars have renounced the rumor.

The first mention of Mary Magdalene is in the Gospel of Matthew 27 vs 56, “55 Many women were there, watching from a distance. They had followed Jesus from Galilee to care for his needs. 56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joseph, and the mother of Zebedee’s sons.” In terms of biblical timeline, her first encounter with Jesus is when he performs a miracle, driving out seven demons that are inside of her.

“After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out; 3 Joanna the wife of Chuza, the manager of Herod’s household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means.”

What makes Mary Magdalene important is that we can learn loyalty and devotion from her. She was present for many of the important events in Jesus’ life: She was at his crucifixion, but unlike others, she stayed until he was taken from the cross and placed in the tomb; along with Salome and Mary the mother of James, they carry spices to anoint the body, and she is the first one he appears to, not the 11 disciples.

Are you a loyal friend?

Delilah: Like Jezebel, Delilah is not a well-loved woman in the Bible. When Delilah first meets Samson, she is living in the Valley of Sorek. As many of you know already, at the time, Samson is the strongest man, who gets his strength from his hair, which has never been cut. The rulers of Philistine do not like him and often scheme to kill him, but are never successful. Unfortunately for Samson, he falls in love with Delilah. The Philistines approach her, charging her with finding out what gives her lover, his incredible strength, offering to each give her eleven hundred shekels of silver.

 “6 So Delilah said to Samson, “Tell me the secret of your great strength and how you can be tied up and subdued.”

7 Samson answered her, “If anyone ties me with seven fresh bowstrings that have not been dried, I’ll become as weak as any other man.”

8 Then the rulers of the Philistines brought her seven fresh bowstrings that had not been dried, and she tied him with them. 9 With men hidden in the room, she called to him, “Samson, the Philistines are upon you!” But he snapped the bowstrings as easily as a piece of string snaps when it comes close to a flame. So the secret of his strength was not discovered.

10 Then Delilah said to Samson, “You have made a fool of me; you lied to me. Come now, tell me how you can be tied.”” Judges 16, NIV

So Delilah continues to ask Samson about his strength and he keeps on toying with her, giving her false answers. She keeps on nagging until she finally wears him down, then Samson tells Delilah that no razor has ever touched his hair, and that’s why he is so strong. She realizes that her lover has told her everything, and she betrays him. While he is sleeping, Delilah cuts off Samson’s seven braids. He loses his strength and the Philistine captures, blinds and imprisons him.

One evening they bring Samson to entertain the masses, and he prays to God asking for strength one last time. He pulls down the columns holding the building, killing himself and everyone present.

The story of Delilah is about the ultimate betrayal, and it is sad because we are supposed to be able to trust those in our inner circle. We are supposed to be able to trust those whom we love, and who profess to love us in return. The story is also about greed and what some will do for money.

What lessons have you learned from the 3 women of the Bible?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Image credit of Esther, Mary Magdalene and Delilah via Wikipedia.

Sources Cited/Referenced

The Holy Bible
Women of the Bible, a CBS Collector’s Edition
All the Women of the Bible by ML Mastro

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-iv/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-iv/#respond Wed, 15 Apr 2015 07:10:27 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17842

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV

Gilmore Girls Reading List
Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV

This is the final instalment in the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List. One of the ways to read more books is to read books on topics that interest you. I have never been a history buff, but I learned about history by reading about people who interest me, and I learned about history through their eyes. I also was not a big fan of science fiction, but I decided that I would give it a chance and I started off with the foundation trilogy. Although science fiction is still not my favorite genre, I find myself liking many books from that genre. Life is about exploring and taking chances. If you are reading a book and you do not like it, give yourself permission to abandon it because there are too many published books to waste your time reading something that doesn’t interest you, or hold your attention.

There are many different kinds of books on the Gilmore Girls Reading List, and if you read a book a week, in over five years you would have read all the 339 books on the list. I have my own list of books that I want to read, and some of them are on the Gilmore Girls Reading List, but I will not be using this list as a guide. This post was inspired by Francine Clouden’s “I Challenge You to Read 339 Books + A Free Checklist.”

Related Post

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show 

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part II

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part III 

Book Review: Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov

Here are the last 92 books on the list of 339 books, so you can determine which ones you’d like to read. And once again the books are from a variety of genres, so there is something for everyone.

  1. The Red Tent: A Novel by Anita Diamant
  2. Rescuing Patty Hearst (Memories From a Decade Gone Mad) by Virginia Holman
  3. The Return of the King: Being the Third Part of the Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  4. “R” is for Ricochet (A Kinsey Millhone Mystery, Book 18) by Sue Grafton
  5. Rita Hayworth (Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption a Story from Different Seasons) by Stephen King
  6. Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised, 11th edition by Henry Robert
  7. Roman Fever: Short Story by Edith Wharton
  8. Romeo and Juliet (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  9. A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf
  10. A Room with a View by E. M. Forster
  11. Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin
  12. The Rough Guide to Europe, 2003 Edition
  13. Sacred Time: A Novel by Ursula Hegi
  14. Sanctuary: The Corrected Text by William Faulkner
  15. Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay by Nancy Milford
  16. Daisy Miller by Henry James
  17. The Scarecrow of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  18. The Scarlet Letter (Dover Thrift Editions) by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  19. Seabiscuit: An American Legend (Ballantine Reader’s Circle) by Laura Hillenbrand
  20. The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir
  21. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
  22. Secrets of the Flesh: A Life of Colette by Judith Thurman
  23. Elegant Hotels of Europe: Charm, Luxury, Style
  24. Selected Letters of Dawn Powell : 1913-1965 by Dawn Powell
  25. Sense and Sensibility (Collins Classics) by Jane Austen
  26. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  27. Several Biographies of Winston Churchill (Winston Churchill Biography: The Making of a Hero (World War ii Collection, Winston Churchill Books))
  28. Sexus ~ Books 1 & 2 ~ Complete in One Volume (The Rosy Crucifixion) by Henry Miller
  29. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  30. Shane by Jack Shaefer
  31. The Shining by Stephen King
  32. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  33. “S” is for Silence (A Kinsey Millhone Mystery, Book 19) by Sue Grafton
  34. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
  35. Small Island: A Novel by Andrea Levy
  36. The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories by Ernest Hemingway
  37. Snow-White and Rose-Red / by Brothers Grimm, Illustrated by Marjorie Cooper by Grimm Brothers
  38. Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World by Barrington Moore
  39. The Song of Names by Norman Lebrecht
  40. Song of the Simple Truth: The Complete Poems of Julia de Burgos (Dual Language Edition:: Spanish, English) (Spanish and English Edition) by Julia de Burgos
  41. The Song Reader by Lisa Tucker
  42. Songbook by Nick Hornby
  43. Shakespeare’s Sonnets by William Shakespeare
  44. Sonnets from the Portuguese: A Celebration of Love by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  45. Sophie’s Choice by William Styron
  46. The Sound and the Fury: The Corrected Text by William Faulkner
  47. Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited by Vladimir Nabokov
  48. Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadaversby Mary Roach
  49. The Story of My Life: The Restored Classic, Complete and Unabridged, Centennial Edition by Helen Keller
  50. A Streetcar Named Desire (Signet) by Tennessee Williams
  51. Stuart Little by E. B. White
  52. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
  53. Swann’s Way: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. 1 (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Marcel Proust
  54. Swimming with Giants: My Encounters with Whales, Dolphins and Seals by Anne Collett
  55. Sybil by Flora Rheta Schreiber
  56. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  57. Tender Is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  58. Terms of Endearment: A Novel by Larry McMurtry
  59. Time and Again by Jack Finney
  60. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  61. To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway
  62. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  63. The Tragedy of King Richard III: The Oxford Shakespeare The Tragedy of King Richard III (Oxford World’s Classics) by William Shakespeare
  64. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Modern Classics) by Betty Smith
  65. The Trial by Franz Kafka
  66. The True and Outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters: A Novel by Elisabeth Robinson
  67. Truth & Beauty: A Friendship by Ann Patchett
  68. Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom
  69. Ulysses by James Joyce
  70. Gilmore Girls Reading ListThe Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath by Sylvia Plath
  71. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  72. Unless: A Novel (P.S.) by Carol Shields
  73. Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann
  74. The Vanishing Newspaper [2nd Ed]: Saving Journalism in the Information Age by Philip Meyers
  75. Vanity Fair (Penguin Classics) by William Makepeace Thackeray
  76. Velvet Underground’s The Velvet Underground and Nico (Thirty Three and a Third series) by Joe Harvard
  77. The Virgin Suicides: A Novel by Jeffrey Eugenides
  78. Waiting for Godot (Eng rev): A Tragicomedy in Two Acts by Samuel Beckett
  79. Walden by Henry David Thoreau
  80. Walt Disney’s Bambi (Disney’s Wonderful World of Reading) by Felix Salten
  81. War and Peace (Vintage Classics) by Leo Tolstoy
  82. We Owe You Nothing, Punk Planet : The Collected Interviews by Daniel Sinker
  83. What Colour is Your Parachute? 2005 (What Color Is Your Parachute? 2015: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers) by Richard Nelson Bolles
  84. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? by Henry Farrell
  85. When the Emperor Was Divine by Julie Otsuka
  86. Who Moved My Cheese?: An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life by Spencer Johnson
  87. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee
  88. Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West (Wicked Years) by Gregory Maguire
  89. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  90. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  91. The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  92. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

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