The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com You're Never Alone Mon, 20 Apr 2015 06:15:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/bridge-to-terabithia-by-katherine-paterson-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/bridge-to-terabithia-by-katherine-paterson-book-review/#respond Mon, 20 Apr 2015 06:15:03 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17862 Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson, Book Review Katherine Paterson was inspired to write Bridge to Terabithia when her son’s close friend was killed by lightning. Published in 1977, Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson is a children’s book about the friendship between Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke. Nine year old Leslie is an only […]

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Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson, Book Review

Bridge to TerabithiaKatherine Paterson was inspired to write Bridge to Terabithia when her son’s close friend was killed by lightning. Published in 1977, Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson is a children’s book about the friendship between Jess Aarons and Leslie Burke. Nine year old Leslie is an only child and 10 year old Jess is one of five children and the middle child. Jess is feeling neglected as the middle child and doing too many chores in the household because his two older sisters are skilled at getting out of performing chores and his two younger sisters, May Belle who is six years old and Joyce Anne who is four are considered to be too young to help out around the home.  The father works very hard, so when he returns home from his long commute from DC, he is too tired and doesn’t pay any attention to Jess. The young boy is feeling like he doesn’t have enough time for himself, and wants a quiet place where he can draw.

When the story starts, it is the summer and Jess is training because he wants to be the fastest runner in fifth grade at Lark Creek Elementary School. For one day, on April 22nd, when he was in fourth grade, he won and was the hero at his school for a day. Each morning, before Jess does his chores, he runs across the meadows of his family’s small farm in rural Virginia – outside of Washington DC. One morning while he is racing he notices someone sitting on a fence, but because of the way the person is dressed, and the hairstyle, he has a hard time figuring out if it’s a girl or a boy, and that’s the first time he sees Leslie. Jess craves his father’s attention, and it is hope that if he becomes the fastest runner, his father will become proud of him. Leslie’s family recently moved into the old Perkins place, next to their farm.

When school opens after the summer holidays, the running resumes during recess, and Jess is confident that he is the fastest runner because he has been training so much. Leslie wants to participate, but the other boys do not want to allow her because she is a girl. Jess stands up for her and she ends up running faster than all the boys, including Jess, for the entire week, so that’s the end of running because which boy wants to lose a race against a girl? The other children at Lark Creek Elementary do not like Leslie because she looks, dresses and behaves differently from them.

Leslie and Jess develop a friendship, and you see the lad transforming into who he might become. Leslie likes him for who he is and doesn’t judge him. Jess’ father does not approve of his artistic abilities, though he is quite good, but his music teacher, Miss Edmunds, encourages him to continue drawing. Leslie and Jess find a secret place, between both properties, where they create an imaginary Kingdom that they name Terabithia, and the two become king and queen. Leslie opens up a new world for him, also telling him about the books she read such as Narnia. Jess’ self-confidence starts to soar, running is no longer important to him because he has something to look forward to – Terabithia. For Christmas, Jess sees a sign for free puppies and gets one for Leslie’s present, while she gets him a paint set. They name the puppy Prince Terrien.

One day, Miss Edmunds takes Jess to some of the museums in DC, but he doesn’t get permission from his parents to go. When he returns home, he realizes that something is very wrong, and he learns that Leslie died while he was out. The parents think that he too had died. Jess doesn’t believe that Leslie is dead, but the good thing is that his father is there for him during this very difficult time. In honor of Leslie, who was more like an extension of himself, he makes the trek to Terabithia to hold a ceremony in her honor.

“”It’s a sign from the Spirits,” Jess said quietly. “We made a worthy offering.”

He walked slowly, as part of a great procession, though only the puppy could be seen, slowly forward carrying the queen’s wreath to the sacred grove. He forced himself deep into the dark center of the grove and, kneeling, laid the wreath upon the thick carpet of golden needles.

“Father, into Thy hands I commend her spirit.” He knew Leslie would have liked those words. They had the ring of the sacred grove in them.

The solemn procession wound its way through the sacred grove homeward to the castle.

Like a single bird across a stormcloud sky, a tiny peace winged its way through the chaos inside his body.”

He also uses the lumber he received from Leslie’s parents to build a bridge to Terabithia. May Belle follows him to see where he is going and he carefully leads her to meet the imaginary people of Terabithia.

Although Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson is a children’s book, it demonstrates the power that friends have over each other. It’s often been said that you are the sum total of the five people closest to you, who are you spending your time with? I recommend Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-3-women-of-the-bible/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-3-women-of-the-bible/#respond Thu, 16 Apr 2015 07:59:49 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17852 Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible In the last instalment in the series, Women of the Bible, we will briefly look at the lives of Esther, Mary Magdalene and Delilah. This post is not about religion or the Bible, but a look at some prominent women of the Bible. Related Posts Post […]

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Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible

Women of the Bible
Post Women’s History Month: 3 Women of the Bible

In the last instalment in the series, Women of the Bible, we will briefly look at the lives of Esther, Mary Magdalene and Delilah. This post is not about religion or the Bible, but a look at some prominent women of the Bible.

Related Posts

Post Women’s History Month: Ruth – Women of the Bible 
Post Women’s History Month: Jezebel – Women of the Bible 

Esther: Do you play it safe, or risk your personal safety, standing up for what’s right? But what is the right thing to do? That’s a tough question, one that most of us ponder from time-to-time. The answer depends on the situation that you find yourself in. Queen Esther is married to King Xerxes, King of the Medes and Persians. His Chief Officer of the State, Haman, plans to kill all the Jews in Persia. Haman doesn’t like Mordecai, Esther’s uncle, and wants revenge. Haman is quite sneaky, to get back at Mordecai, he tells the king that some of the subjects defy his edicts – they won’t bow down to him. Haman knows the king very well, so he knows which weaknesses to exploit to get what he wants.

Mordecai is pressuring Esther to talk to the King about Haman’s planned genocide, but she is fearful for her life. Mordecai tells Esther that even though she is a part of the King’s household, doesn’t mean that she is safe if the planned massacre goes ahead. Now, King Xerxes is not known for his benevolence, and in fact, if anyone has the audacity to speak to him, without his expressed permission, could be killed. And wives are not exempted from this rule. What would you advise Queen Esther to do? Remember, it is a time very different from today, where women didn’t have the many rights and freedoms they have today.

At first, Esther refuses to grant Mordecai his request, but the more she thinks about the situation, the more she realizes that the right thing to do is to risk her personal safety, to speak to her husband. Before she takes the plunge, she asks the Jews in the kingdom to go on a 3-day fast with her, and she decides that if she perishes, so be it. After the fast, she adorns herself in her royal robes, then positions herself in front of the king’s hall. King Xerxes sees her, extends his gold scepter to indicate that she can approach him. She does so, touching the tip of the scepter.

“3 Then the king asked, “What is it, Queen Esther? What is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be given you.”

4 “If it pleases the king,” replied Esther, “let the king, together with Haman, come today to a banquet I have prepared for him.”

5 “Bring Haman at once,” the king said, “so that we may do what Esther asks.”

So the king and Haman went to the banquet Esther had prepared. 6 As they were drinking wine, the king again asked Esther, “Now what is your petition? It will be given you. And what is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be granted.”

7 Esther replied, “My petition and my request is this: 8 If the king regards me with favor and if it pleases the king to grant my petition and fulfill my request, let the king and Haman come tomorrow to the banquet I will prepare for them. Then I will answer the king’s question.”” Esther 5 v 3-8 New International Version

As you can see from the above Bible passage, Queen Esther does not just blurt out what she wants from the king, she knows that she has to be strategic to beat Haman at his game. She knows her opponent, therefore, she develops a strategy to win the game, hence, the scene has to be perfect, and to her, a banquet is the perfect place to execute her strategy.

At the banquet, King Xerxes asks Esther about her request, and she sets up Haman’s downfall perfectly.

“3 “If I have found favor with you, Your Majesty, and if it pleases you, grant me my life—this is my petition. And spare my people—this is my request. 4 For I and my people have been sold to be destroyed, killed and annihilated. If we had merely been sold as male and female slaves, I would have kept quiet, because no such distress would justify disturbing the king.”

5 King Xerxes asked Queen Esther, “Who is he? Where is he—the man who has dared to do such a thing?”

6 Esther said, “An adversary and enemy! This vile Haman!”” Esther 7 v 3-6 New International Version

What happens next? Haman is hanged on the gallows he prepared for Mordecai?

The big lessons in the story are to treat all people with respect; think carefully and plan your response to situations; and study your opponents, so you know how to respond effectively to impending threats.

Mary Magdalene: Mary Magdalene is considered to be one of Jesus’ closest companions, and was one of his devoted disciples. Their relationship was so close that she is the first person that Jesus appears to, after his resurrection, and he tells Mary Magdalene to spread the word. In the Bible, there are countless nameless women, so it is surprising that Mary Magdalene is mentioned over 12 times in the Gospels. It is worth noting that there is a rumor floating around that Mary Magdalene had an intimate relationship with Jesus, but some Biblical scholars have renounced the rumor.

The first mention of Mary Magdalene is in the Gospel of Matthew 27 vs 56, “55 Many women were there, watching from a distance. They had followed Jesus from Galilee to care for his needs. 56 Among them were Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James and Joseph, and the mother of Zebedee’s sons.” In terms of biblical timeline, her first encounter with Jesus is when he performs a miracle, driving out seven demons that are inside of her.

“After this, Jesus traveled about from one town and village to another, proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The Twelve were with him, 2 and also some women who had been cured of evil spirits and diseases: Mary (called Magdalene) from whom seven demons had come out; 3 Joanna the wife of Chuza, the manager of Herod’s household; Susanna; and many others. These women were helping to support them out of their own means.”

What makes Mary Magdalene important is that we can learn loyalty and devotion from her. She was present for many of the important events in Jesus’ life: She was at his crucifixion, but unlike others, she stayed until he was taken from the cross and placed in the tomb; along with Salome and Mary the mother of James, they carry spices to anoint the body, and she is the first one he appears to, not the 11 disciples.

Are you a loyal friend?

Delilah: Like Jezebel, Delilah is not a well-loved woman in the Bible. When Delilah first meets Samson, she is living in the Valley of Sorek. As many of you know already, at the time, Samson is the strongest man, who gets his strength from his hair, which has never been cut. The rulers of Philistine do not like him and often scheme to kill him, but are never successful. Unfortunately for Samson, he falls in love with Delilah. The Philistines approach her, charging her with finding out what gives her lover, his incredible strength, offering to each give her eleven hundred shekels of silver.

 “6 So Delilah said to Samson, “Tell me the secret of your great strength and how you can be tied up and subdued.”

7 Samson answered her, “If anyone ties me with seven fresh bowstrings that have not been dried, I’ll become as weak as any other man.”

8 Then the rulers of the Philistines brought her seven fresh bowstrings that had not been dried, and she tied him with them. 9 With men hidden in the room, she called to him, “Samson, the Philistines are upon you!” But he snapped the bowstrings as easily as a piece of string snaps when it comes close to a flame. So the secret of his strength was not discovered.

10 Then Delilah said to Samson, “You have made a fool of me; you lied to me. Come now, tell me how you can be tied.”” Judges 16, NIV

So Delilah continues to ask Samson about his strength and he keeps on toying with her, giving her false answers. She keeps on nagging until she finally wears him down, then Samson tells Delilah that no razor has ever touched his hair, and that’s why he is so strong. She realizes that her lover has told her everything, and she betrays him. While he is sleeping, Delilah cuts off Samson’s seven braids. He loses his strength and the Philistine captures, blinds and imprisons him.

One evening they bring Samson to entertain the masses, and he prays to God asking for strength one last time. He pulls down the columns holding the building, killing himself and everyone present.

The story of Delilah is about the ultimate betrayal, and it is sad because we are supposed to be able to trust those in our inner circle. We are supposed to be able to trust those whom we love, and who profess to love us in return. The story is also about greed and what some will do for money.

What lessons have you learned from the 3 women of the Bible?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Image credit of Esther, Mary Magdalene and Delilah via Wikipedia.

Sources Cited/Referenced

The Holy Bible
Women of the Bible, a CBS Collector’s Edition
All the Women of the Bible by ML Mastro

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-iv/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-iv/#respond Wed, 15 Apr 2015 07:10:27 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17842 Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV This is the final instalment in the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List. One of the ways to read more books is to read books on topics that interest you. I have never been a history buff, but I learned about history […]

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV

Gilmore Girls Reading List
Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part IV

This is the final instalment in the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List. One of the ways to read more books is to read books on topics that interest you. I have never been a history buff, but I learned about history by reading about people who interest me, and I learned about history through their eyes. I also was not a big fan of science fiction, but I decided that I would give it a chance and I started off with the foundation trilogy. Although science fiction is still not my favorite genre, I find myself liking many books from that genre. Life is about exploring and taking chances. If you are reading a book and you do not like it, give yourself permission to abandon it because there are too many published books to waste your time reading something that doesn’t interest you, or hold your attention.

There are many different kinds of books on the Gilmore Girls Reading List, and if you read a book a week, in over five years you would have read all the 339 books on the list. I have my own list of books that I want to read, and some of them are on the Gilmore Girls Reading List, but I will not be using this list as a guide. This post was inspired by Francine Clouden’s “I Challenge You to Read 339 Books + A Free Checklist.”

Related Post

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show 

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part II

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part III 

Book Review: Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov

Here are the last 92 books on the list of 339 books, so you can determine which ones you’d like to read. And once again the books are from a variety of genres, so there is something for everyone.

  1. The Red Tent: A Novel by Anita Diamant
  2. Rescuing Patty Hearst (Memories From a Decade Gone Mad) by Virginia Holman
  3. The Return of the King: Being the Third Part of the Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  4. “R” is for Ricochet (A Kinsey Millhone Mystery, Book 18) by Sue Grafton
  5. Rita Hayworth (Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption a Story from Different Seasons) by Stephen King
  6. Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised, 11th edition by Henry Robert
  7. Roman Fever: Short Story by Edith Wharton
  8. Romeo and Juliet (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  9. A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf
  10. A Room with a View by E. M. Forster
  11. Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin
  12. The Rough Guide to Europe, 2003 Edition
  13. Sacred Time: A Novel by Ursula Hegi
  14. Sanctuary: The Corrected Text by William Faulkner
  15. Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay by Nancy Milford
  16. Daisy Miller by Henry James
  17. The Scarecrow of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  18. The Scarlet Letter (Dover Thrift Editions) by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  19. Seabiscuit: An American Legend (Ballantine Reader’s Circle) by Laura Hillenbrand
  20. The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir
  21. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd
  22. Secrets of the Flesh: A Life of Colette by Judith Thurman
  23. Elegant Hotels of Europe: Charm, Luxury, Style
  24. Selected Letters of Dawn Powell : 1913-1965 by Dawn Powell
  25. Sense and Sensibility (Collins Classics) by Jane Austen
  26. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  27. Several Biographies of Winston Churchill (Winston Churchill Biography: The Making of a Hero (World War ii Collection, Winston Churchill Books))
  28. Sexus ~ Books 1 & 2 ~ Complete in One Volume (The Rosy Crucifixion) by Henry Miller
  29. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  30. Shane by Jack Shaefer
  31. The Shining by Stephen King
  32. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
  33. “S” is for Silence (A Kinsey Millhone Mystery, Book 19) by Sue Grafton
  34. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
  35. Small Island: A Novel by Andrea Levy
  36. The Snows of Kilimanjaro and Other Stories by Ernest Hemingway
  37. Snow-White and Rose-Red / by Brothers Grimm, Illustrated by Marjorie Cooper by Grimm Brothers
  38. Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy Lord and Peasant in the Making of the Modern World by Barrington Moore
  39. The Song of Names by Norman Lebrecht
  40. Song of the Simple Truth: The Complete Poems of Julia de Burgos (Dual Language Edition:: Spanish, English) (Spanish and English Edition) by Julia de Burgos
  41. The Song Reader by Lisa Tucker
  42. Songbook by Nick Hornby
  43. Shakespeare’s Sonnets by William Shakespeare
  44. Sonnets from the Portuguese: A Celebration of Love by Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  45. Sophie’s Choice by William Styron
  46. The Sound and the Fury: The Corrected Text by William Faulkner
  47. Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited by Vladimir Nabokov
  48. Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadaversby Mary Roach
  49. The Story of My Life: The Restored Classic, Complete and Unabridged, Centennial Edition by Helen Keller
  50. A Streetcar Named Desire (Signet) by Tennessee Williams
  51. Stuart Little by E. B. White
  52. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
  53. Swann’s Way: In Search of Lost Time, Vol. 1 (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Marcel Proust
  54. Swimming with Giants: My Encounters with Whales, Dolphins and Seals by Anne Collett
  55. Sybil by Flora Rheta Schreiber
  56. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  57. Tender Is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  58. Terms of Endearment: A Novel by Larry McMurtry
  59. Time and Again by Jack Finney
  60. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
  61. To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway
  62. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  63. The Tragedy of King Richard III: The Oxford Shakespeare The Tragedy of King Richard III (Oxford World’s Classics) by William Shakespeare
  64. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Modern Classics) by Betty Smith
  65. The Trial by Franz Kafka
  66. The True and Outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters: A Novel by Elisabeth Robinson
  67. Truth & Beauty: A Friendship by Ann Patchett
  68. Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life’s Greatest Lesson by Mitch Albom
  69. Ulysses by James Joyce
  70. Gilmore Girls Reading ListThe Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath by Sylvia Plath
  71. Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  72. Unless: A Novel (P.S.) by Carol Shields
  73. Valley of the Dolls by Jacqueline Susann
  74. The Vanishing Newspaper [2nd Ed]: Saving Journalism in the Information Age by Philip Meyers
  75. Vanity Fair (Penguin Classics) by William Makepeace Thackeray
  76. Velvet Underground’s The Velvet Underground and Nico (Thirty Three and a Third series) by Joe Harvard
  77. The Virgin Suicides: A Novel by Jeffrey Eugenides
  78. Waiting for Godot (Eng rev): A Tragicomedy in Two Acts by Samuel Beckett
  79. Walden by Henry David Thoreau
  80. Walt Disney’s Bambi (Disney’s Wonderful World of Reading) by Felix Salten
  81. War and Peace (Vintage Classics) by Leo Tolstoy
  82. We Owe You Nothing, Punk Planet : The Collected Interviews by Daniel Sinker
  83. What Colour is Your Parachute? 2005 (What Color Is Your Parachute? 2015: A Practical Manual for Job-Hunters and Career-Changers) by Richard Nelson Bolles
  84. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? by Henry Farrell
  85. When the Emperor Was Divine by Julie Otsuka
  86. Who Moved My Cheese?: An Amazing Way to Deal with Change in Your Work and in Your Life by Spencer Johnson
  87. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee
  88. Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West (Wicked Years) by Gregory Maguire
  89. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  90. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
  91. The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  92. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part III http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-iii/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-iii/#respond Tue, 14 Apr 2015 06:29:59 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17833 Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part III I went out of town and thought I would take a break from the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List, which I think is a good thing because it gives you time to digest the over 140 books I have already covered. […]

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part III

Gilmore Girls Reading List
Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part III

I went out of town and thought I would take a break from the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List, which I think is a good thing because it gives you time to digest the over 140 books I have already covered. If you are a fan of the Gilmore Girls show, and if you do not read a lot of books, might I suggest that it is a great time to read more books by simply reading some of the books from the 339 from the show over the seven years it was on TV.

Related Post

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show 

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Part II

Here are the second 106 books on the list of 339 books, so you can determine which ones you’d like to read. And once again the books are from a variety of genres, so there is something for everyone. By the way, how many of the 106 books have you read?

Gilmore Girls Reading List

  1. Ironweed: A Novel by William J. Kennedy
  2. It Takes a Village, Tenth Anniversary Edition by Hillary Rodham Clinton
  3. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  4. The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
  5. Julius Caesar (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  6. The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County (with original illustrations) by Mark Twain
  7. The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
  8. Just a Couple of Days by Tony Vigorito
  9. The Kitchen Boy: A Novel of the Last Tsar by Robert Alexander
  10. Kitchen Confidential Updated Edition: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (P.S.) by Anthony Bourdain
  11. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  12. Lady Chatterley’s Lover by D. H. Lawrence
  13. The Last Empire: Essays 1992-2000 by Gore Vidal
  14. Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
  15. The Legend of Bagger Vance: A Novel of Golf and the Game of Life by Steven Pressfield
  16. Less Than Zero by Bret Easton Ellis
  17. Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke
  18. Lies: And the Lying Liars Who Tell Them by Al Franken
  19. Life of Pi by Yann Martel
  20. Little Dorrit (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens
  21. The Little Locksmith: A Memoir by Katharine Butler Hathaway
  22. The Little Match Girlby Hans Christian Andersen
  23. Little Women (Puffin in Bloom) by Louisa May Alcott
  24. Living History by Hillary Rodham Clinton
  25. Gilmore Girls Reading List
    Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show, Part II

    Lord of the Flies by William Golding

  26. The Lottery, and Other Stories by Shirley Jackson
  27. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  28. Love Story by Erich Segal
  29. Macbeth (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  30. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  31. The Manticore (Penguin Classics) by Robertson Davies
  32. Marathon Man by William Goldman
  33. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  34. Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter (Perennial Classics) by Simone de Beauvoir
  35. Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman by William Tecumseh Sherman
  36. Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris
  37. The Meaning of Consuelo: A Novel (Bluestreak) by Judith Ortiz Cofer
  38. A Mencken Chrestomathy: His Own Selection of His Choicest Writing by H. R. Mencken
  39. The Merry Wives of Windsor (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  40. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
  41. Middlesex: A Novel (Oprah’s Book Club) by Jeffrey Eugenides
  42. The Miracle Worker: A Play by William Gibson
  43. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  44. The Mojo Collection: The Ultimate Music Companion by Jim Irvin
  45. Molière: A Biography by Hobart Chatfield Taylor
  46. A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960 by Milton Friedman
  47. Monsieur Proust (New York Review Books Classics) by Celeste Albaret
  48. A Month of Sundays: Searching for the Spirit and My Sister by Julie Mars
  49. A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition by Ernest Hemingway
  50. Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
  51. Mutiny on the Bounty by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall
  52. My Lai 4: A Report on the Massacre and Its Aftermath by Seymour M. Hersh
  53. My Life As Author And Editor by H. R. Mencken
  54. My Life in Orange: Growing Up with the Guru by Tim Guest
  55. Myra Waldo’s travel and motoring guide to Europe, 1978 by Myra Waldo
  56. My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
  57. The Naked and the Dead: 50th Anniversary Edition by Norman Mailer
  58. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
  59. The Namesake: A Novel by Jhumpa Lahiri
  60. The Nanny Diaries: A Novel by Emma McLaughlin
  61. Nervous System: Or, Losing My Mind in Literature by Jan Lars Jensen
  62. New Poems of Emily Dickinson by Emily Dickinson
  63. The New Way Things Work by David Macaulay
  64. Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich
  65. Night by Elie Wiesel
  66. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  67. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism (Second Edition) by William E. Cain, Laurie A. Finke, Barbara E. Johnson, John P. McGowan
  68. Novels 1930-1942 Dance Night/Come Back To Sorrento Turn Magic Wheel/Angels On Toast/A Time To Be Born (Library Of America) Novels 1930-1942 by Dawn Powell
  69. Notes of a Dirty Old Man by Charles Bukowski
  70. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  71. Old School by Tobias Wolff
  72. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
  73. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Signet) by Ken Kesey
  74. One Hundred Years of Solitude (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  75. The Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life by Amy Tan
  76. Oracle Night: A Novel by Paul Auster
  77. Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
  78. Othello by Shakespeare
  79. Our Mutual Friend (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens
  80. The Outbreak of the Peloponnesian War (A New History of the Peloponnesian War) by Donald Kagan
  81. Out of Africa (Modern Library 100 Best Nonfiction Books) by Isac Dineson
  82. The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton
  83. A Passage to India by E.M. Forster
  84. The Peace of Nicias and the Sicilian Expedition (A New History of the Peloponnesian War) by Donald Kagan
  85. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  86. Peyton Place (Hardscrabble Books-Fiction of New England) by Grace Metalious
  87. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  88. Pigs at the Trough: How Corporate Greed and Political Corruption Are Undermining America by Arianna Huffington
  89. Pinocchio The Tale of a Puppet by Carlo Collodi
  90. Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain
  91. The Polysyllabic Spree by Nick Hornby
  92. The Portable Dorothy Parker (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Dorothy Parker
  93. The Portable Nietzsche (Portable Library) by Fredrich Nietzche
  94. Gilmour Girls Reading List
    Gilmour Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show

    The Price of Loyalty: George W. Bush, the White House, and the Education of Paul O’Neill by Ron Suskind

  95. Pride and Prejudice (Dover Thrift Editions) by Jane Austen
  96. Property by Valerie Martin
  97. Pushkin: A Biography by T. J. Binyon
  98. Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw
  99. Quattrocento by James Mckean
  100. A Quiet Storm: A Novel by Rachel Howzell Hall
  101. Rapunzel (World Classics) by Grimm Brothers
  102. The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe
  103. The Razor’s Edge by W. Somerset Maugham
  104. Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books by Azar Nafisi
  105. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
  106. Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm (Classic Starts) by Kate Douglas Wiggin

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show, Part II http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-ii/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show-part-ii/#respond Thu, 09 Apr 2015 07:30:22 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17822 Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show, Part II Yesterday we started the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List. As many of you already know, this year on The Invisible Mentor Blog, we are reading a book a week for 52 weeks. There are many reading challenges, but what makes this […]

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show, Part II

Gilmore Girls Reading List
Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show, Part II

Yesterday we started the series on the Gilmore Girls Reading List. As many of you already know, this year on The Invisible Mentor Blog, we are reading a book a week for 52 weeks. There are many reading challenges, but what makes this Challenge different is that we are connecting the ideas from the books we read, so it is important to record the big ideas from each book. At the end of each month, review your notes on each book you read, then connect the ideas from the four books you read that month. If you are a Gilmore Girls fan, then read a book each week from the Gilmore Girls Reading List.

If you read the way that I suggest for the Invisible Mentor Challenge, you will become more creative and able to generate a wealth of new ideas.

Related Post

Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show

Here are 71 books on the list of 339 books, so you can determine which ones you’d like to read. And once again the books are from a variety of genres, so there is something for everyone.

Gilmore Girls All Grown Up

Cannot view the video, click here!

Gilmore Girls Reading List

  1. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test by Tom Wolfe
  2. Ella Minnow Pea: A Novel in Letters by Mark Dunn
  3. Eloise: A Book for Precocious Grown Ups by Kay Thompson
  4. Emily the Strange: The Lost Days by Roger Reger
  5. Emma by Jane Austen
  6. Empire Falls by Richard Russo
  7. Encyclopedia Brown, Boy Detective by Donald J. Sobol
  8. Ethan Frome (Dover Thrift Editions) by Edith Wharton
  9. Ethics (Penguin Classics) by Spinoza
  10. Rick Steves Europe Through the Back Door 2003: The Travel Skills Handbook for Independent Travelers by Rick Steves
  11. Eva Luna: A Novel by Isabel Allende
  12. Everything Is Illuminated: A Novel by Jonathan Safran Foer
  13. Extravagance: A Novel by Gary Krist
  14. Fahrenheit 451: A Novel by Ray Bradbury
  15. Fahrenheit 9/11 by Michael Moore
  16. The Fall of the Athenian Empire (A New History of the Peloponnesian War) by Donald Kagan
  17. Fat Land: How Americans Became the Fattest People in the World by Greg Critser
  18. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream by Hunter S. Thompson
  19. The Fellowship of the Ring: Being the First Part of The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  20. Fiddler on the Roof by Joseph Stein
  21. The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
  22. Finnegans Wake (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin) by James Joyce
  23. Fletch by Gregory McDonald
  24. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
  25. The Fortress of Solitude by Jonathan Lethem
  26. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
  27. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  28. Franny and Zooey by J. D. Salinger
  29. Freaky Friday by Mary Rodgers
  30. Galapagos: A Novel (Delta Fiction) by Kurt Vonnegut
  31. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity (Routledge Classics) by Judith Butler
  32. George W. Bushisms: The Slate Book of Accidental Wit and Wisdom of Our 43rd President by Jacob Weisberg
  33. Gidget by Fredrick Kohner
  34. Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen
  35. The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
  36. The Godfather (Signet) by Mario Puzo
  37. The God of Small Things: A Novel by Arundhati Roy
  38. Goldilocks and the Three Bears: Bears Should Share! (Another Point of View) by Alvin Granowsky
  39. Gone with the Wind, 75th Anniversary Edition by Margaret Mitchell
  40. The Good Soldier by Ford Maddox Ford
  41. Letters to Judy: What Kids Wish They Could Tell You Judy Blume
  42. The Graduate by Charles Webb
  43. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  44. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  45. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  46. The Group by Mary McCarthy
  47. Hamlet (Signet Classic Shakespeare) by William Shakespeare
  48. Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire by J. K. Rowling
  49. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J. K. Rowling
  50. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers
  51. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  52. Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders by Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry
  53. Henry IV, Part I (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  54. Henry IV, Part II (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  55. Henry V (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare
  56. High Fidelity by Nick Hornby
  57. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Penguin Classics) by Edward Gibbon
  58. Holidays on Ice by David Sedaris
  59. The Holy Barbarians by Lawrence Lipton
  60. House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
  61. The House of the Spirits: A Novel by Isabel Allende
  62. How to Breathe Underwater by Julie Orringer
  63. How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (Classic Seuss) by Dr. Seuss
  64. How the Light Gets In by M. J. Hyland
  65. Howl, and Other Poems by Allen Ginsberg
  66. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Signet Classics) by Victor Hugo
  67. The Iliad (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Homer
  68. I’m with the Band: Confessions of a Groupie by Pamela des Barres
  69. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
  70. The Inferno (Signet Classics) by Dante
  71. Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/gilmore-girls-reading-list-books-mentioned-on-the-tv-show/#respond Wed, 08 Apr 2015 06:30:00 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17816 Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show Are you a fan of Gilmore Girls? Years ago, while spending time with my family in New York, my niece watched repeats of Gilmour Girls and Sex in the City. I couldn’t get into Sex in the City, but I got hooked on watching Gilmore […]

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Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show

Gilmore Girls Reading List
Gilmore Girls Reading List: Books Mentioned on the TV Show

Are you a fan of Gilmore Girls? Years ago, while spending time with my family in New York, my niece watched repeats of Gilmour Girls and Sex in the City. I couldn’t get into Sex in the City, but I got hooked on watching Gilmore Girls until the series ended. Although I am not a single mother, I felt that Lorelai and I were kindred spirits, and that’s why week after week, I was in front of my television, ready to see what would happen next. I no longer have a television, but I remember the show fondly. I haven’t thought about Gilmore Girls for years, but recently, I saw the blog post, “I Challenge You to Read 339 Books + A Free Checklist.”

The Challenge, blogger Francine Clouden is talking about is to read the 339 books that were mentioned on Gilmour Girls during its seven seasons. In the post, Clouden writes that she has read 86 of the books so far, 39 more than I have read. Several of the books are on the list of books for me to read for The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge. I appreciate that Clouden has taken the time to compile the list of 339 books for easy access. However, for people who are over 40 years old, the size of the font is too small, so it is very difficult to read the names of the books. Looking at the 339 books on the list, if anyone took the time to read all those books, she would have an expanded mind, getting an education in the process. And she would reap even more benefits if she took notes while reading each book, then review them in relation to each other. That’s how to get the most from the books you read. And what I like most about the Gilmore Girls Reading List, is the diversity of the books on the list. If you want to read broadly, the way we are doing this year, for The Invisible Mentor Challenge, this is one of the ways to go.

Related Posts

Taking Better Notes – Learning to Abbreviate Words

Tips on Note-taking: The Art of Writing While Listening

To Remember More of What You Read, Take Notes by Hand 

For people who are over 40, here are the first 70 books on the list of 339 books, so you can determine which ones you’d like to read.

Gilmore Girls Big List of Books to Read 

  1. 1984 (Signet Classics) by George Orwell
  2. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  3. Alice in Wonderland (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass (Bantam Classics)) by Lewis Carroll
  4. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay (with bonus content): A Novel by Michael Chabon
  5. An American Tragedy (Signet Classics) by Theodore Dreiser
  6. Angela’s Ashes: A Memoir by Frank McCourt
  7. Anna Karenina (Modern Library Classics) by Leo Tolstoy
  8. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
  9. The Archidamian War (A New History of the Peloponnesian War) by Donald Kagan
  10. The Art of Fiction by Henry James
  11. The Art Of War by Sun Tzu
  12. As I Lay Dying: The Corrected Text by William Faulkner
  13. Atonement: A Novel by Ian McEwan
  14. Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy
  15. The Awakening by Kate Chopin
  16. Babe: The Gallant Pig by Dick King-Smith
  17. Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women by Susan Faludi
  18. Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress: A Novel by Dai Sijie
  19. Bel Canto (P.S.) by Ann Patchett
  20. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
  21. Beloved by Toni Morrison
  22. Beowulf: A New Verse Translation (Bilingual Edition) by Seamus Heaney
  23. Bhagavad Gita: A New Translation
  24. The Bielski Brothers: The True Story of Three Men Who Defied the Nazis, Built a Village in the Forest, and Saved 1,200 Jews by Peter Duffy
  25. Bitch: In Praise of Difficult Women by Elizabeth Wurtzel
  26. A Bolt from the Blue and Other Essays by Mary McCarthy
  27. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  28. Brick Lane: A Novel by Monica Ali
  29. Brigadoon by Alan Jay Lerner
  30. Candide by Voltaire
  31. The Canterbury Tales by Chaucer
  32. Carrie (Movie Tie-in Edition): Now a Major Motion Picture by Stephen King
  33. Catch-22: 50th Anniversary Edition by Joseph Heller
  34. The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
  35. Charlotte’s Web (Trophy Newbery) by E. B. White
  36. The Children’s Hour – Acting Edition by Lillian Hellman
  37. Christine (Signet) by Stephen King
  38. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  39. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
  40. The Code of the Woostersby P.G. Wodehouse
  41. The Collected Stories of Eudora Welty by Eudora Welty
  42. The Comedy of Errors (Dover Thrift Editions) by William Shakespeare
  43. Dawn Powell: Novels 1930-1942 (Library of America) by Dawn Powell
  44. The Complete Poems: Anne Sexton by Anne Sexton
  45. Complete Stories (Penguin Classics) by Dorothy Parker
  46. A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
  47. The Count of Monte Cristo (Penguin Classics) by Alexandre Dumas
  48. Cousin Bette (Oxford World’s Classics) by Honore de Balzac
  49. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  50. The Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber
  51. The Crucible: A Play in Four Acts by Arthur Miller
  52. Cujo by Stephen King
  53. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  54. Daughter of Fortune: A Novel by Isabel Allende
  55. Lisa And David by Dr Theodore Issac Rubin M.D
  56. David Copperfield (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens
  57. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
  58. Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
  59. Demons (Penguin Classics) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  60. Death of a Salesman (Penguin Plays) by Arthur Miller
  61. Deenie by Judy Blume
  62. The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America by Erik Larson
  63. The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band by Tommy Lee, Vince Neil, Mick Mars and Nikki Sixx
  64. The Divine Comedy (The Inferno, The Purgatorio, and The Paradiso) by Dante
  65. Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood: A Novel (The Ya-Ya Series) by Rebecca Wells
  66. Don Quixote by Cervantes
  67. Driving Miss Daisy. by Alfred Uhrv
  68. The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
  69. Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems by Edgar Allan Poe
  70. Eleanor Roosevelt (Eleanor Roosevelt, Vol. 1: 1884-1933), (Eleanor Roosevelt : Volume 2 , The Defining Years, 1933-1938) by Blanche Wiesen Cook

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Shane by Jack Schaefer, Book Review http://theinvisiblementor.com/shane-by-jack-schaefer-book-review/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/shane-by-jack-schaefer-book-review/#respond Tue, 07 Apr 2015 09:57:53 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17810 Shane by Jack Schaefer, Book Review I saw Shane by Jack Schaefer on my brother’s bookshelf and I decided to take it to remember him. Published in 1949, this book is a western classic read in schools, but I had never heard of it before. The story is narrated by a young boy, Robert MacPherson […]

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Shane by Jack Schaefer, Book Review

Shane by Jack Schaefer
Shane by Jack Schaefer, Book Review

I saw Shane by Jack Schaefer on my brother’s bookshelf and I decided to take it to remember him. Published in 1949, this book is a western classic read in schools, but I had never heard of it before. The story is narrated by a young boy, Robert MacPherson Starrett, affectionately known as Bob, and you get to see the spirit of the west, what life was like in the Wyoming Valley in the 1890s,through the eyes of this young lad.

In the summer of 1899, Shane rides to the Wyoming Valley, weary, and needing water for both himself and his horse. The cowboy stops at a ranch and asks permission to get some water. Bob spots him a long distance away, and when the cowboy comes to his parent’s homestead, the first thing the lad notices is that the cowboy is dressed differently from others who live in the Valley. After drinking the water and washing his face, he thanks the farmer and his family and is ready to move on.

Bob’s parents, Joe and Marian Starrett invite the cowboy for a meal and to spend the night. The cowboy introduces himself as Shane. Of course the family is curious about this man, so they ask a lot of questions in many different ways, but Shane sidesteps them, yet he does so in a nice and polite manner. There is something hard and cold in Shane’s eyes, yet the Starrett family knows that they will be very safe around him, and they have nothing to fear. He assures them that he isn’t running from the law, but the reader knows that he is running from something, perhaps himself.

The next morning, Marian prepares a hearty breakfast, which includes pancakes, and Shane is very grateful for the meal, heartily devouring it. She is very interested in the high fashion in places that Shane rode through, and he describes the latest hat to her. His detailed description shows us that he pays attention to detail. Joe shows him around the farm, telling him about his plans. He asks Shane to stick around to help him work on the farm.

Additionally, homesteaders have been having problems with Fletcher, a wealthy and powerful rancher, who doesn’t want to share the land with others. Shane and Joe work well together, getting a lot accomplished. In no time, the Starrett family adjusts to Shane’s presence on the farm. While Shane is staying with them, Fletcher exerts more pressure on the farmers to grab more land to expand his ranch. Many of the homesteaders view Joe as their leader, so they follow what he does.

As you are reading the book, you get a sense that there is more than meets the eye when it comes to Shane. You realize that he is trying to change, and also that he is working hard to tame the beast that’s inside of him. One day when Shane rides into town to get a pitchfork fixed, he meets Chris, one of Fletcher’s men, and although the young man eggs him on, Shane is the bigger person, and walks away from the confrontation. But Chris misinterprets Shane’s reason for walking away, and brags to all who will listen, and in no time, Shane and Joe become the laughing stock in the area.

Shane attempts to rectify situation with Chris, but the young man begins a fight in the bar and the cowboy beats him quite badly.  Joe and Shane become more vigilant because they know that Fletcher will amplify his aggression. One Saturday, while Shane and the Starrett family are in town, four of Fletcher’s men attack Shane, while Joe and Marian are talking to Bob’s teacher. Shane is holding his own until they hold him down while one of the men starts to beat him mercilessly. Joe comes in time, frees Shane, and both of them are able to beat Fletcher’s men.

Fletcher is quite upset with the way things are going, so he goes away for a short time, accompanied by the hired gun, Stark Wilson. Stark creates a situation where he kills Ernie, one of the homesteaders who refuses to sell his land to Fletcher. Fletcher goes out to the Starrett farm to make an offer to Joe for his farm, as well as to ask him to become his employee, and as can be expected, Joe turns him down. But the wealthy rancher gives him time to think it over. Shane knows that Joe is unable to beat Stark in a gunfight, so he does what any friend would do, and that is to knock Joe out and go into town to talk to Fletcher, and take on Stark if he has to. Shane retrieves his gun, which he hasn’t used in ages, then rides into town. Bob follows him, and sees the whole event. Stark is over confident, believing that he can gun down Shane – it never occurs to him, that someone is better and faster at drawing a gun. There is a surprised look on Stark’s face when Shane draws first, killing him. Shane also kills Fletcher, so the town has nothing to fear now. Because the beast is released, Shane realizes that he has to leave the Wyoming Valley, since he isn’t able to change – he is who he is, and cannot escape his past, whatever it is. He rides away, and one of the neighbors takes Bob home.

Shane by Jack Schaefer is about courage, the importance of family, loyalty and doing the right thing. I recommend Shane by Jack Schaefer.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Grab a copy of Shane. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Post Women’s History Month: Jezebel – Women of the Bible http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-jezebel-women-of-the-bible/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-jezebel-women-of-the-bible/#respond Mon, 06 Apr 2015 19:02:50 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17806 Post Women’s History Month: Jezebel – Women of the Bible In today’s instalment in the series, Women of the Bible, we focus on Jezebel. Once again, the focus isn’t about religion, and not on the Bible, but on bad leadership – the actions that despots take. Jezebel oppresses and persecutes others and destroys them when […]

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Post Women’s History Month: Jezebel – Women of the Bible

Jezebel
Post Women’s History Month: Jezebel – Women of the Bible

In today’s instalment in the series, Women of the Bible, we focus on Jezebel. Once again, the focus isn’t about religion, and not on the Bible, but on bad leadership – the actions that despots take. Jezebel oppresses and persecutes others and destroys them when they have beliefs, unlike her own – she is the school yard bully. Do you know any leaders like that?

King Ethbaal, Jezebel’s father, the King of the Sidonians, sends her to marry Ahab. Both Ahab and Jezebel serve and worship, Baal, an idol. Jezebel kills off the prophets, only Elijah is left. Elijah tells Obadiah that he wishes to speak to his master, Ahab. At the meeting, Elijah tells Ahab to summon the Israelites to meet him on Mount Carmel, and to bring the 450 prophets of Baal, and 400 prophets of Asherah, who eat at Jezebel’s table.

When everyone is present on Mount Carmel, Elijah reprimands them for worshipping idols. Elijah wants to have a showdown to demonstrate, who the real God is. The prophet recommends that they get two bulls, one for each side. He will call on his God, and the rest can call on Baal. The prophets of Baal prepare the bull for sacrifice, and they call on him, but there isn’t a response. They dance, and nothing happen, while Elijah taunts them, mocking them, and telling them to shout louder.

It’s now Elijah’s turn, and he prepares his bull for sacrifice and for good measure, he pours four jars of water over the altar. He prays to God and a fire consumes the sacrifice, the altar, and scorches the earth. The people are amazed at what Elijah had done. He commands them to kill the prophets of Baal. He flees the scene and heads to Jezreel.

When Ahab returns home, he tells Jezebel about what happened, and she curses Elijah. She sends a messenger to the prophet, telling him that she wishes the gods deal with him severely. Elijah is fearful for his life and goes into hiding. Sometime later, Ahab asks Naboth, the Jezreelite for his vineyard to use as a vegetable garden. Naboth tells him, ‘no.’ Ahab is furious, and complains to Jezebel. Jezebel plots, falsely accusing Naboth, who is charged with cursing God, and is subsequently stoned to death. Neither Jezebel nor Ahab are great leaders – Ahab is passive, allowing his wife to take action on his behalf.

More time passes, Ahab is enticed into battle, where he is killed. Jezebel also dies – she is thrown from her bedroom window, then wild dogs devour her body. I have left out a lot of information, which is not germane to the story of Jezebel. The story of Jezebel and Ahab takes place over several chapters in the first book of Kings, and over several years. That’s a horrible death, even for someone who committed so many atrocities. When you oppress people, treating them unfairly, at some point, they are going to resist, and push back. You will not be able to rule with an iron fist forever.

The big lesson from the story of Jezebel is to treat all people fairly and with respect. Do not covet other people’s possessions, nor punish them because they have beliefs that are very different from yours. Reading about Jezebel, you will learn what great leaders do not do.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

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Post Women’s History Month: Ruth – Women of the Bible http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-ruth-women-of-the-bible/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/post-womens-history-month-ruth-women-of-the-bible/#respond Fri, 03 Apr 2015 11:16:13 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17800 Post Women’s History Month: Ruth – Women of the Bible Where do ideas come from? I was in Rite Aid Pharmacy on Third Avenue in the Bronx, looking for a pair of nylons to wear to my brother’s memorial service, when I noticed the book and magazine section. I wasn’t pressed for time, so with […]

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Post Women’s History Month: Ruth – Women of the Bible

Ruth
Post Women’s History Month: The Story of Ruth – Women of the Bible

Where do ideas come from? I was in Rite Aid Pharmacy on Third Avenue in the Bronx, looking for a pair of nylons to wear to my brother’s memorial service, when I noticed the book and magazine section. I wasn’t pressed for time, so with nylons in hand, I went over to the section to see what books were on offer. I spotted, Women of the Bible, a CBS Collector’s Edition and thought since Easter is just around the corner, it may be worth reading. This blog post is not about religion, it’s about demonstrating the actions of some women, and the lessons we can learn from them. Lessons can come from anywhere.

Later in the day, the creative juices started flowing, and it occurred to me to write a post that would work for Women’s History Month and Easter, and this is how the idea for Post Women’s History Month: Women of the Bible was born. The point is that you never know where you will get your next idea. To execute my idea for the blog post, I knew that it was doable because I had the book, All the Women of the Bible by ML Mastro, so I had another information source. I knew that I wanted to feature Esther, Mary Magdalene and Ruth, but after browsing through both books, I added Jezebel and Delilah. Life is filled with good and bad, ups and downs, so I thought it important to feature a couple of women of the Bible who are not well-loved because you can learn lessons from everyone.

I will start off with Ruth, and over the Easter weekend, feature the other women.

Ruth: I have always liked the story of Ruth in the Bible because some of the choices she made were very different from the ones I would make, had I been in her situation. Imagine that your husband dies, what would you do? Stay with your mother-in-law or return to your own family. Remember that Ruth was living in a time very different from today. Naomi and Elimelech had two sons – Chilion and Mahlon – whom they raised to be good husbands – to treat women with respect, and take care of their wives. Mahlon married Ruth and Chilion married Orpah. Elimelech died, then both sons, leaving the women to fend for themselves. Back in the day, women had fewer choices than they do today. Mother-in-law, Naomi decided to return to Jerusalem, encouraging her daughters-in-law to return to their family.

Ruth stayed with Naomi, and this emotional Bible passage has always touched me, even though I cannot see myself responding in that way.

“And Ruth said, Intreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God.” King James Bible Authorized Version, Cambridge Edition

Ruth
The Story of Ruth

Ruth and Naomi made the trek to Bethlehem. For food, each day, Ruth worked in the barley fields belonging to Boaz, Naomi’s distant cousin. It was very hard work, and not the kind that Ruth was accustomed to, but she didn’t allow that to stop her. We do what it takes to survive. When the harvest season was almost over, Naomi encouraged Ruth to court Boaz. Imagine a woman courting a man in those days? Ruth’s action paid off, she and Boaz married, producing a son from the joining. I like Ruth because she was loyal, kind-hearted and a woman ahead of her time. These are lessons that we can learn from her.

If you were in Ruth’s situation, what would you have done differently?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, and Oh, The Places You’ll Go http://theinvisiblementor.com/green-eggs-and-ham-the-cat-in-the-hat-and-oh-the-places-youll-go/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/green-eggs-and-ham-the-cat-in-the-hat-and-oh-the-places-youll-go/#respond Thu, 02 Apr 2015 09:43:01 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17795 Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, and Oh, The Places You’ll Go Over the years, I have seen Dr Seuss’ quotes or heard people talk about his books. I usually go quiet because I have never had the pleasure of reading any of his books until I read Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in […]

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Green Eggs and HamThe Cat in the Hat, and Oh, The Places You’ll Go

Green Eggs and Ham
Green Eggs and Ham , The Cat in the Hat , and Oh, The Places You’ll Go, Book Reviews

Over the years, I have seen Dr Seuss’ quotes or heard people talk about his books. I usually go quiet because I have never had the pleasure of reading any of his books until I read Green Eggs and HamThe Cat in the Hat, and Oh, The Places You’ll Go over the last two days. I can understand why children like Dr Seuss’ books because the stories are whimsical and colorful with illustrations of animals that are over the top. I would have loved to read Green Eggs and Ham, and The Cat in the Hat as a child. I didn’t enjoy reading them so much at this stage in my life, even though they made me chuckle a few times. On the other hand, I really enjoyed reading Oh, the Places You’ll Go because it was written for adults and I could relate to the story.

Born Theodor Seuss Geisel, Dr Seuss was unable to have children – although he acquired step-children from his second wife – so he tapped into his inner child. He developed a unique style for writing books, which served him well over his 60-year career. He wrote nearly 50 books, which have sold over 200 million copies, and translated into nearly 20 languages. According to the Encyclopedia of World Biography, four of the Dr Seuss’ books are on the top 10 hardcover children’s books of all time – The Cat in the Hat; Green Eggs and Ham; One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (I Can Read It All by Myself); and Hop on Pop (I Can Read It All By Myself).

Green Eggs and Ham: Published in 1960, Green Eggs and Ham is the first Dr Seuss book that I read – only a few days ago. This book is the result of a challenge to write a book with fewer than 50 words. Except for the word “anywhere,” all the words in the story are monosyllabic. As I was reading Green Eggs and Ham, I could see why his books appeal to children all over the world. The story is whimsical, imaginative and colorful. I would have loved to read this book with its over-the-top illustrations, when I was a child. The story is simple, but packs a powerful lesson, that looks are deceiving, and you should try things even if you do not think you will enjoy them. One of the characters in the story doesn’t want to eat green eggs and ham, who would? It doesn’t sound or look very appetizing. He states that he won’t eat green eggs and ham under any circumstances, holding his ground. But Sam badgers him relentlessly, until he caves in and decides to try it to get some peace. And you know what, he realizes that he likes green eggs and ham after all.

The Cat in the Hat: Although Dr Seuss was an established children’s writer when he published The Cat in the Hat in 1957, the book solidified his reputation and changed the landscape of children’s book publishing. The Cat in the Hat is the result of a challenge from his friend, William Spaulding, an editor at Houghton Mifflin, to write a reading primer, using a limited number of words. At 233 words, The Cat in the Hat was a runaway success, selling nearly one million copies by 1960, three years after it was first published. By 2000, seven times that amount of The Cat in the Hat was sold. In the story, it is a very rainy day, brother and sister are bored because they cannot go outside to play. An upright walking cat, wearing a red and white hat, red bow tie, strolls into the house, starts to entertain them, wrecking the house in the process. The story is hysterically funny because of its silliness.

Oh, The Places You’ll Go: I really enjoyed Oh, the Places You’ll Go, and I can see why it’s a common graduation gift. Published in 1990, Dr Seuss wrote this book for adults, and it accurately depicts what life will be like when you leave the comforts of the classroom. You will face ups and downs, highs and lows, happiness and sadness, and there are times when you have to go through tough times by yourself. You will fail and succeed, and when you fail, pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and keep going. Does this sound familiar to you? It’s the story of your life and my life. Oh, the Places You’ll Go is the last book, Dr Seuss published before his death in 1991.

I recommend Green Eggs and HamThe Cat in the Hat, and Oh, The Places You’ll Go, but I especially liked the last one because I can relate to the story.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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