The Invisible Mentor http://theinvisiblementor.com You're Never Alone Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:22:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Women’s History Month: Do You Know These 7 Women of Power http://theinvisiblementor.com/womens-history-month-do-you-know-these-7-women-of-power/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/womens-history-month-do-you-know-these-7-women-of-power/#respond Mon, 30 Mar 2015 16:22:42 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17784 Women’s History Month: Do You Know These 7 Women of Power In continuing with the Women’s History Month series, I have been publishing interviews since 2004, first in my newsletter, Ambeck Edge, and now on The Invisible Mentor blog. Along the way, I have interviewed many interesting women who are going places with their career. […]

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Women’s History Month: Do You Know These 7 Women of Power

Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month: Do You Know These 7 Women of Power

In continuing with the Women’s History Month series, I have been publishing interviews since 2004, first in my newsletter, Ambeck Edge, and now on The Invisible Mentor blog. Along the way, I have interviewed many interesting women who are going places with their career. Although many of them have now changed jobs or even careers, their advice is timeless and worth reading. One of the things that I am noticing, is that many of the senior level women I know are very savvy in managing their careers and are very good at figuring out when it’s time to move on. There are many nuggets of wisdom and you can find information to help you manage your career.

Sarah Speake: When I first met Sarah Speake virtually, she was a senior level executive at Google UK. Since leaving Google, she has changed her job again. There are a few things that struck me while interviewing her, but the one that I’d like to mention is her response to the question, “What’s one of the toughest decision you’ve had to make?” Imagine having to turn off the life support on your child. Please read Sarah Speake’s interview Part I of Sarah Speake Interview and Part II of Sarah Speake Interview.

Christina Ioannidis: I met Christina Ioannidis at a conference in Toronto back in 2010, where she was a guest speaker a few years ago. One thing I particularly liked about her is her networking savvy, and I gained access to Sarah Speake because of Christina. Two of her life lessons are to love what you are doing and to seize the day. She is also bold, which is one of the traits that women need to succeed, and she was able to turn failure into success. Part I of Christina Ioannidis Interview and Part II of Christina Ioannidis Interview.

Patty DeDominic: A friend virtually introduced me to Patty DeDominic, and I recognized her as a strong woman who was going places. She is very client-focused and one of the things that I like about her is her courage to make the necessary changes in her life. In the interview Patty talks about becoming overweight and what she did to reduce her weight. There are other instances in the interview where you will see her courage shining through. Patty DeDominic is definitely a woman of power and someone who is always going places. Part I of Patty DeDominic Interview and Part II of Patty DeDominic Interview.

Martha Mertz: Martha Mertz is another woman of power and influence. I interviewed a colleague for this blog and she recommended that I also interview Martha. With all the technologies we have access to today, we can virtually meet anyone who we want to meet. She is the founder of Athena International, which is an organization that supports, develops and honors women who have achieved the highest level of professional excellence. One of the reasons that she is so successful is that she doesn’t hold on to her failures. When Martha started her first business in the late 70s, there weren’t many resources to support women, yet she succeeded. Part I of Marta Mertz Interview and Part II of Marta Mertz Interview.

Rosemary McCarney: Rosemary McCarney is the President and CEO of PLAN Canada. She is another woman of power and influence, and expert at problem solving, which is a key part of her job. By reading Rosemary’s interview, you will see leadership in action. She believes in ongoing learning, and the most successful people invest in their professional development. One of the things she struggles with is to find the proper balance between work and life, something that many women of power, struggle with. There are many nuggets of wisdom from this interview. Part I of Rosemary McCarney Interview  and Part II of Rosemary McCarney Interview.

Carol McManus: I first met Carol McManus, also known America’s LinkedIn Lady, on a teleseminar hosted by Diane Danielson. I was so impressed with her that I asked her if I could interview her.  Mentors were very important in Carol’s success, and also her ability to adapt to changes in her environment. In her candid interview, she tells us that when she has failed in her life, it’s when she did not follow through – that is an important lesson there. Part I of Carol MacManus Interview and Part II of Carol MacManus Interview.

Diane Danielson: When I think of Diane Danielson, Brave, Bold and Pioneer come to mind. I always learn from each interview that I conduct, but there were many lessons in this one and I’m sure that you’ll agree. Some important lessons are: make sure that your career suits your personality, separate your emotions from the facts, figure out your passion and what you are good at and be at the forefront. And be flexible because your life doesn’t always turn out the way you expect, but change often brings lovely presents, so be open. She has since moved on from the Downtown Women’s Club, an organization she ran for several years. Diane is someone who knows when it’s time to move on. Part I of Diane Danielson Interview and Part II of Diane Danielson Interview.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Women’s History Month: 10 Books by Women You Should Consider Reading http://theinvisiblementor.com/womens-history-month-10-books-by-women-you-should-consider-reading/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/womens-history-month-10-books-by-women-you-should-consider-reading/#respond Tue, 24 Mar 2015 09:49:46 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17760 Women’s History Month: 10 Books by Women You Should Consider Reading March is celebrated as Women’s History Month, so I have pulled some books that I read and enjoyed that were written by women from the archives. The books are very different, but each is a work of art. These 10 books you should consider […]

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Women’s History Month: 10 Books by Women You Should Consider Reading

Women's History Month

Women’s History Month: 10 Books by Women You Should Consider Reading

March is celebrated as Women’s History Month, so I have pulled some books that I read and enjoyed that were written by women from the archives. The books are very different, but each is a work of art. These 10 books you should consider reading. Let me know how many of these 10 books you have read!

  1. Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier, Book Review:  In Jamaica Inn, after her mother dies, Mary makes the journey to her Aunt Patience and Uncle Joss Merlyn. While on the journey, Mary learns that people don’t think highly of her Uncle Joss, and in fact, he’s despised by his neighbors. While Joss is away, one day, Mr Bassat, a magistrate, raids Jamaica Inn, but finds no evidence of smuggling or other wrongdoing because the evidence had been removed the night before. Are you intrigued yet?
  2. Catching the Catfishers by Tyler Cohen Wood – What’s Your Digital Footprint?: In Catching the Catfishers: Disarm the Online Pretenders, Predators, and Perpetrators Who Are Out to Ruin Your Life, Cohen Wood points out that to get access to some types of information, you have to give up some of your privacy, and that resonates with me because there are times when I decide to not get a report or e-book because I believe that too much information is being requested. You can also read Tyler Cohen guest post, ‘Don’t Let Your Social Media Identity Ruin Your Hard-earned Business Reputation“.
  3. Girl With a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier, Book Review: Not much is known about the artist, Johannes Vermeer, so authors such as Tracy Chevalier and Susan Vreeland have re-imagined his life, based on extensive research on what life was like in Delft in the 1660s for someone in his position. They have presented their findings in their respective novels, Girl With a Pearl Earring: A Novel, and Girl in Hyacinth Blue. Circumstances can change at the drop of a hat – the death of a spouse, the loss of a job, or even a change in relationship status. For the main character, 16-year-old Griet in Tracy Chevalier’s Girl with a Pearl Earring, her father loses his ability to work and support his family after a kiln explosion damages his eyes. Her younger brother Frans is working as an apprenticeship to become a tile maker, but she has to now support her family.
  4. Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland, Book Review: In Susan Vreeland’s Girl in Hyacinth Blue, the star in the story is a Johannes Vermeer painting. At his apartment, Cornelius Engelbrecht shows Richard an unsigned painting that is in the style of Johannes Vermeer. For a math teacher, Cornelius knows an awful lot about Johannes Vermeer and his paintings, and tries to convince Richard that the painting is an authentic Vermeer. This is an intriguing story.
  5. My Antonia by Willa Cather, Review: First published in 1918, at the end of the First World War, My Antonia by Willa Cather, tells the story of what life was like in the American West in the 1880s.
  6. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder: Reading Little House on the Prairie (Little House Nine-Book Box Set) by Laura Ingalls Wilder took me back in time to when I used to watch the series on TV, which is based on this book. When the story starts, Charles Ingalls wants to move his family, wife Caroline, and daughters, Mary, Laura and Carrie from the Big Woods of Wisconsin to the West.
  7. Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf, Review: Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf, first published in 1925, is a day in the life of the character Clarissa Dalloway, the perfect hostess. While I am reading Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf, I wonder how Septimus’ story connects with Clarissa’s and the mystery is solved during her party.
  8. Think Like a SheEO: Succeeding in the Age of Creators, Makers and Entrepreneurs: I used to say all the time that I do not read business books because they usually do not provoke deep thought. Recently I changed my mind because there are some interesting and game-changing books that are being published. I enjoyed Think Like A SheEO: Succeeding in the Age of Creators, Makers and Entrepreneurs. The book provides tools to increase the success rate of small businesses. Vicki is big on collaboration, and suggests that you work with others whose skills complement yours.
  9. July’s People by Nadine Gordimer, a Book Review: July’s People was written by Nadine Gordimer, a world renowned South African author, who died last year. The book gives us a close-up look at what life was like during apartheid in South Africa. During apartheid, the rights of the black majority were suppressed while White Supremacy and the Afrikaner minority ruled. Apartheid came to an end in 1994. First published in 1981, by way of July’s People, Nadine Gordimer foresaw the civil war and political unrest that would occur in her country. Unrest has been brewing for a while now, and through the eyes of white, liberal minded Bamford and Maureen Smales, who own an architectural firm, we are taken into the world of apartheid.
  10. Review: Briefcase Essentials by Susan T. Spenser: Susan T. Spenser attained phenomenal success in areas that are non-traditional for women so I decided to focus on her experiences which she outlines in Briefcase Essentials: Discover Your 12 Natural Talents for Achieving Success in a Male-Dominated Workplace.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Women’s History Month: Women Who Changed the World http://theinvisiblementor.com/womens-history-month-women-who-changed-the-world/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/womens-history-month-women-who-changed-the-world/#respond Fri, 20 Mar 2015 15:08:31 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17751 Women’s History Month: Women Who Changed the World March is Women’s History Month, how do you celebrate it? I often review books written by women and write mini biographies of women who have changed the world. For this year, I am going to dive into my archives and feature some of these women, who worked […]

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Women’s History Month: Women Who Changed the World

Women Who Changed the World

Women’s History Month: Women Who Changed the World

March is Women’s History Month, how do you celebrate it? I often review books written by women and write mini biographies of women who have changed the world. For this year, I am going to dive into my archives and feature some of these women, who worked tirelessly to make it better for other women. There are many younger, female readers of this blog who may not know how women from another era changed the world so they have the rights and freedoms they now have. Learn from these nine women who changed the world.

Harriet Beecher Stowe, Abolitionist and Author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin: While Harriet Beecher Stowe was growing up, she enjoyed reading, and one of her favourite books was Magnolia by Cotton Mather. Stowe’s book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin is her response to the Fugitive Slave Act. Uncle Tom’s Cabin first appeared serialized in the anti-slavery journal National Era, a publication edited by Dr. Gamaliel Bailey, which came out of Washington D.C. Beecher Stowe was contracted to write 40 instalments which ran from June 5, 1851 to April 1, 1852. The instalments were so well-received that publisher John P. Jewett agreed to publish the serial in book form. There were several dramatizations of the story which aided in the sale of the book. In four months, Beecher Stowe received $10,000 in royalty, a respectable sum in 1852. And during the first 5 years of its publication, Uncle Tom’s Cabin sold half a million copies in America and two million copies in ten years.

Eleanor Roosevelt, American First Lady, International Diplomat, Writer and Philanthropist: Eleanor Roosevelt used her position of First Lady to champion her causes and secure social and political reforms. Through her newspaper columns and radio broadcasts, she became the voice of those in need, which included, working women, African Americans, youth and farmers. On the advice of her very good friend, journalist Lorena Hickok, Roosevelt held weekly press conferences for women only. This ensured that media organizations had women on staff in Washington, DC, and that some of the news in the country was told from the perspective of women. She supported appointments of women to government positions. A big winner was Frances Perkins, who was secretary of labor for Franklin’s administration.

 Jane Addams,  Pioneer in Social Reform, Founder of Hull House and First American Woman to be Awarded a Nobel Peace Prize:  Jane Addams became known throughout the United States, and used her fame to help to reform Chicago’s corrupt politicians, as well as help to resolve the Pullman railway strike in 1894. She was a social activist, pursuing social reforms in the United States, including abolition of child labour and sweat shops; immigrant protection and education; women’s right to vote and the need for peace. Addams was a pacifist and worked tirelessly to keep America neutral and out of World War I. She felt that war was not an appropriate resolution to disputes. During 1914, Addams served as chair of the Chicago Emergency Peace Federation and as a member of the Round Table Conference on War. In January 1915, Addams and Carrie Chapman convened a group in Washington, DC, which resulted in the Woman’s Peace Party with Addams as the chair.

Mary Wollstonecraft, the Founder of Feminism: Mary Wollstonecraft is widely considered the founder of the feminist movement, though she was out of favour for nearly a century after she died. William Goodwin published an honest memoir about Wollstonecraft, and many were dismayed that she was not legally married to Imlay, even though they had a child (Fanny Imlay) together. She was also criticized and ridiculed after her death because of the contents of the memoir. It’s sad that people so easily discounted her contributions. During Wollstonecraft’s time, poverty hampered middle-class women in the marriage market. And the only jobs available to them were teaching, working as a governess, needlepoint and serving as a lady’s companion. Wollstonecraft was not particularly good at any of those roles, so her only other option was to become a professional writer, reviewer or editorial assistant. She prepared herself for a writing career by reading extensively. Wollstonecraft also wrote about what she knew, and due to her varied life experiences, her novels had rich imagery. Her other writings also exposed the double standards between men and women in the society in which she lived in. She advocated for educating women so that they could better educate their children.

Susan Brownell Anthony, Women’s Rights Activist and Abolitionist: Susan Brownell Anthony was very outspoken and said what was on her mind, which made her an excellent reformer. While working as a teacher, she discovered that male teachers earned $10 a week while their female counterparts earned a measly $2.50. Anthony raised her objections and subsequently was fired. That did not dampen her spirits, though. Over the years, Anthony voiced her objections about many issues such as slavery, women’s inability to manage their own money, and right to vote. It was the tireless work of Anthony and her colleagues that allowed women, many rights that they now take for granted. Anthony was exposed to social issues like anti-slavery, temperance (anti-alcohol) and women’s rights because her father often hosted reformers and abolitionists like Frederick Douglass, Wendell Phillips and William Lloyd Garrison in their home. Anthony’s parents and her younger sister attended the Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848 where they signed the first Declaration of Women’s Rights.

Margaret Sanger, Birth Control Advocate, Founder, Planned Parenthood: As a midwife, Margaret Higgins Sanger was frequently asked what the secret was to prevent a pregnancy. There were no secrets and at the time physicians did not learn about contraceptives during their studies. She opened the first birth control clinic in Brooklyn in 1916. Sanger coined the term birth control, and founded the Birth Control League, which morphed into Planned Parenthood Federation of America. In 1916, Sanger founded the American Birth Control League in Brooklyn to fill a need, and was briefly imprisoned for opening a birth control clinic. It was the first birth control clinic in the US. In the 1920s, her interest in world population issues grew, and she played a pivotal role in organizing the first World Population Conference in 1927. One of the outcomes of this conference was the establishment of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population Problems.

Emmeline Pankhurst – UK Suffragist, Secured the Right for Married Women to Vote for Local Offices: Emmeline Pankhurst’s militancy brought national attention to women’s suffrage. Her parents were strong supporters of the antislavery movement in the US. As a child, she helped her mother to collect money to aid African Americans. Pankhurst supported Married Women’s Property Bill of 1882, drafted by husband, which gave wives the right to control their own earnings. Over the years, Pankhurst was in and out of prison for protesting, until World War I, where she and some of her supporters scaled down their protests to assist with the war efforts. Other suffragists believed this was a betrayal of the women’s movement. In 1916, parliament enacted the Representation of the People Act, which permitted women over 30 to vote. In 1928, women were granted full and equal suffrage when the second Representation of the People Act (1928) lowered the voting age for women to 21.

Amelia Earhart, Legendary Aviator (and the fatal mistakes she made): Amelia Earhart was a strong advocate for women. She kept a scrapbook of women’s accomplishments in business. Earhart had a lot of firsts in her life when it came to flying. She also popularized commercial aviation by writing a column in Cosmopolitan magazine. There are a lot of things she did correctly, but there are other things that she failed to do which proved to be near fatal and fatal. Earhart could have been an excellent aviator, but she didn’t keep up with her lessons because she was too busy on the lecture circuit. She also flew a plane that she did not have the technical skills to fly and crashed in the process. Fortunately for her, she survived this particular accident. On July 2, 1937, 22 days before her 40th birthday, after already flying 22,000 miles in a round-the-world flight, Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan disappeared between Lae and Howland Island in the mid-Pacific. This was her second attempt. On March 17, 1937, she crashed on takeoff and damaged her twin Lockheed Electra plane, which she was not adequately trained to fly.

Margaret Knight, Inventor: American inventor, Margaret E. Knight, is virtually unknown, but she invented the paper bag. A problem solver, Knight did what many men couldn’t do, she invented a new machine that would automatically fold and glue paper bags to create square bottoms. She conceived of the idea for her paper bag, machine maker in 1867. She spent months working out the design for a machine and had many drawings for the design, and two years perfecting the design. Charles F. Annan tried to steal her invention, but Margaret Knight was meticulous about documenting everything, so we won the lawsuit.

What You Can Learn from Marie Curie, Winner of Two Nobel Prizes: Marie Curie was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the first woman to teach at the Sorbonne. She had many accomplishments in her 67 years and there are many things that we can learn from her. And most importantly, Marie Curie understood that life was not just about her, she had a good grasp of the concept of social responsibility. She carefully documented her research, which teaches us the importance of writing up procedures.

These nine women who changed the world took action to make the world a better place. What one small action can you take to benefit others?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Samuel Beckett Book Recommendations: More Books for Your Personal Library http://theinvisiblementor.com/samuel-beckett-book-recommendations-more-books-for-your-personal-library/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/samuel-beckett-book-recommendations-more-books-for-your-personal-library/#respond Thu, 19 Mar 2015 10:36:29 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17730 Samuel Beckett Book Recommendations: More Books for Your Personal Library This blog post was inspired by Open Culture’s, “The Books Samuel Beckett Read and Really Liked (1941-1956).” Samuel Beckett wrote Waiting for Godot (Eng rev): A Tragicomedy in Two Acts and Three Novels: Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable, which is on my list of books […]

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Samuel Beckett Book Recommendations: More Books for Your Personal Library

Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett Book Recommendations: More Books for Your Personal Library

This blog post was inspired by Open Culture’s, “The Books Samuel Beckett Read and Really Liked (1941-1956).” Samuel Beckett wrote Waiting for Godot (Eng rev): A Tragicomedy in Two Acts and Three Novels: Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable, which is on my list of books to read this year. Beckett became somewhat of a recluse and the list below are the books he read with his notes (Please see Open Culture’s post). He really enjoyed JD Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, a book I found quite depressing. The one thing I would like to say is to give yourself permission not to like books on a must-read list because tastes vary.

The reason why I included the books from the Open Culture website here is to offer you diverse books that you can add to your personal library. Additionally, there are some books on the list that I have never heard of before, and they sound like they would be worth reading. You still have time to start the Reading Challenge by reading a book a week for 52 weeks.

Related Post

Book Summaries: Around the World in 120 Days, Week Six, Day One
Review of Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne

  1. Andromaque by Jean Racine
  2. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
  3. The Castle by Franz Kafka
  4. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  5. Crooked House by Agatha Christie
  6. Effi Briest (Penguin Classics) by Theodor Fontane
  7. The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Signet Classics) by Victor Hugo
  8. Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Céline
  9. Lautréamont and Sade (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) by Maurice Blanchot
  10. Man’s Fate (La Condition Humaine) by Andre Malraux
  11. Mosquitoes by William Faulkner
  12. The Stranger by Albert Camus
  13. The Temptation to Exist by Emil Cioran
  14. La 628-E8 (Sketches of a Journey: Travels in an Early Motorcar: From Octave Mirbeau’s Journal “La 628-E8″ with Illustrations) by Octave Mirbeau

How many of the 14 books have you read? I have read only two books (Catcher in the Rye and Around the World in 80 Days) and two (Journey to the End of the Night and The Stranger) are on my list of books to read this year. I love Jules Verne and I enjoyed reading Around the World in 80 Days. If you take my suggestion to read globally this year, these books will take you closer to realizing that goal.

Samuel Beckett Interview

Cannot view the YouTube video, click

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

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Interview with Sophie Kroesen, 2nd VP, Toronto Occasional Teacher http://theinvisiblementor.com/interview-with-sophie-kroesen-2nd-vp-toronto-occasional-teacher/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/interview-with-sophie-kroesen-2nd-vp-toronto-occasional-teacher/#respond Tue, 17 Mar 2015 11:06:20 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17724 Interview with Sophie Kroesen, 2nd VP, Toronto Occasional Teacher  Invisible Mentor: Sophie Kroesen Company Name: Toronto Occasional Teacher, Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario Website: http://www.etfo-torots.org/  Part One: Introduction Avil Beckford: In a couple of sentences, tell me a little bit about yourself. Sophie Kroesen: I am a pretty happy, outgoing person. I enjoy being with, and […]

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Interview with Sophie Kroesen, 2nd VP, Toronto Occasional Teacher 

Invisible Mentor: Sophie Kroesen
Company Name: Toronto Occasional Teacher, Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario
Website: http://www.etfo-torots.org/ 

Sophie Kroesen

Interview with Sophie Kroesen, 2nd VP, Toronto Occasional Teacher

Part One: Introduction

Avil Beckford: In a couple of sentences, tell me a little bit about yourself.

Sophie Kroesen: I am a pretty happy, outgoing person. I enjoy being with, and meeting new people. I also enjoy the new situation that I’m in, which is organizing professional learning workshops for our members.

Avil Beckford: When you say “our members”, could you tell the audience who “our members” are?

Sophie Kroesen: Last year I took on a position in my local union as the 2nd Vice President, and through the position, I organize professional learning workshops for the members of our local, Occasional Teachers in Toronto.

Avil Beckford: What’s a typical day like for you?

Sophie Kroesen: in the morning, I drive to the office, get here, check my emails and register people for workshops, send them acceptance emails for the workshops, organize the catering, and occasionally take phone calls from the members who need assistance.

Avil Beckford: Tell me about your big break and who gave you.

Sophie Kroesen: I was an occasional teacher in Toronto for about nine years before I started in this new position. I was at a professional development workshop and the woman who was organizing it said to me that she was not going to be running for this elected position the following year, and would it be something that I would be interested in running for. So I listened to what was involved and thought, wow, I do like organizing events, I do love planning, I do love meeting new people and I love the ongoing learning that the union, or local provides, and it was something I was interested in. So, I ran for the position (Third Vice President actually) and I was acclaimed into that position. The Second Vice President who was also acclaimed stepped down, and I moved into the Second Vice President position.

Part Two: Career

Avil Beckford: How did mentors influence your life?

Sophie Kroesen: When I was in university, I was part of a program called Youth Assisting Youth, it was a peer-mentoring program. I think that’s where I started realizing the impacts mentors can have in your life. I was a mentor to a 13-year old girl who was struggling in many ways, and as we continued in our journey through the program – Youth Assisting Youth – I realized the impact that I was having on her life was quite substantial. I then started to look at who were the mentors in my life. I really did not have that many, especially in the role as an occasional teacher; you move around to different schools, you’re not staying in one place. It’s hard to find mentors. When I moved into this position, our President, First Vice President and Treasurer are all people who have definitely helped me learn the ropes, learn how to be successful in this position, if I am successful yet.  I think coming in everyday to three people who support my weaknesses, if I am not successful in something, I do not feel put down in the environment that I am working in; I feel supported. They help me to see different viewpoints, we talk about it. Lots of open communication from the mentors in my life and my office space.

Avil Beckford: What’s one core message you received from your mentors?

Sophie Kroesen: It’s okay to make mistakes. It’s okay to even fail. You just keep trying it until you get it right. Don’t get discouraged if you fail because everyone makes mistakes and everyone isn’t successful every time. But the people who keep rising up are the people who keep trying.

Avil Beckford: An invisible mentor is a unique leader you can learn from by observing them from a distance. In that capacity, what is one piece of advice that you would give to others?

Sophie Kroesen: I would say to be kind to everyone you encounter, and to surround yourself with kind and honest people because you end up acting like the people you are around. To choose who you are around and make sure that everyone you are around feels special at some point or knows that they are important. If someone that’s serving you is short, or rude even, and maybe that person is having a bad day for their own personal reasons, do not snap back at them. Just be a good person.

Avil Beckford: What big steps did you take to succeed in your field? What is one step or action you have consistently taken that contribute the most to your success? Not be afraid to ask.

Sophie Kroesen: The big steps that are taken are to ask, ask a lot of questions, not be afraid to ask, and that comes from the supportive environment that I am working in. So being able, and feeling safe in asking questions because that’s how I learn, and that’s how I am going be successful. One step or action that I have consistently taken is to continue my own professional growth and learning through the provincial organization ETFO [The Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario]. They offer a lot of professional growth conferences and workshops that have greatly assisted me in learning how unions work and what’s involved in member representation, and helping out the people we are representing.

Avil Beckford: Tell me something that you consider important about the work that you do that others can learn from. 

Sophie Kroesen

Interview with Sophie Kroesen, 2nd VP, Toronto Occasional Teacher

Sophie Kroesen: What I would consider is important is the leadership qualities that I had to develop myself. So learning about myself, my own strengths and being aware of what are not strengths, not necessarily weaknesses, but what are not my strengths, and the awareness that comes with realizing that it might be one of those moments, that is not my strongest, and having maybe a toolkit and strategies for managing the situation that I might find myself in. So I had to learn about my own leadership ability and learn how to effectively communicate with others, given my own abilities as a leader or as a communicator. As an occasional teacher for the length of time that I was, I basically was in a classroom and I was the leader and everyone had to listen to me because they had to, because I was the teacher. But working in an environment where everyone’s opinions and thoughts count, and matter, I’ve had to learn how to function in that environment, hopefully, as an effective communication team leader and team worker.

Part Three: Life

Avil Beckford: Describe one of your biggest failures. What lessons did you learn, and how did it contribute to a greater success?

Sophie Kroesen: I don’t know if I have a “biggest failure” because I have only been doing this over one year, some of the failures I have encountered have been mistakes in the workshops, and participant registration, in the caterers, and presenters not showing up, in part because I may have given the wrong information or maybe a miscommunication.  So, I guess what I have learned from that is to confirm everything and to make sure there is fluid communication between presenters, between participants, and even the office staff that I am working with; that there is very open and constant communication between us and that increases communication, because I have a tendency to want to do things by myself and to figure it out by myself. That increase in communication and willingness to talk, I go back to it, but that feeling of it’s safe to talk and ask questions, bounce ideas off of people, that helps to achieve greater success.

Avil Beckford: What’s one of the toughest decisions you’ve had to make and how did it impact your life?

Sophie Kroesen: In work or in life?

Avil Beckford: You can answer whichever way you want.

Sophie Kroesen: One of the toughest decisions was whether I wanted to continue in this position because some personalities I have had to encounter and work with have been extremely difficult and very trying for me. It was a tough decision for me to decide whether I wanted to continue on in this role as 2nd Vice President through this journey of learning, that’s what I call it, through the union, OR go back to the safe place for me, which is teaching in different classrooms, every day, seeing different kids, not really committing to anything, just to the day, teaching that one day. How has it impacted my life, well, we will see next year. Hopefully it’s going to have a good impact.

Avil Beckford: What are three events that helped to shape your life?

Sophie Kroesen:

  1. The first one would be the peer mentoring program that I did through Youth Assisting Youth. The girl that I mentored, we are still in contact, in fact, she is the godmother of my daughter. Learning through her, learning through the program. And they offered a lot, at a young age when I was 18 in University, they offered a lot of courses for me to go to, about leadership, about community involvement, so that would be one.
  2. The second event would be having my two children. My three year old son and my four year old daughter, they definitely shaped my life in many ways.
  3. The third event would be, more recently, my childhood friend. My best friend from childhood passed away, and the message that she left behind, she knew that it was, she knew that as a result of surgery, it was a possibility [that she could pass away], and the message she left behind was her favourite line from a movie, “The greatest thing you’ll ever learn is to love, and be loved in return”, and to remember that.

Avil Beckford: What’s an accomplishment that you are proudest of?

Sophie Kroesen: Choosing to take on this role. As I mentioned before, instead of the safety of just going into a different classroom every day, which I love, and I do love it, knowing that the students are going to listen to me because they have to. They don’t always listen to an occasional teacher, we know this. But [rather than] taking a role on where more than 30 kids in a classroom are relying on you each day, [instead, taking on a role] where people are relying on you for their professional learning, to assist them, to guide them through their own professional careers. So being elected into this position, the feeling of responsibility that comes with it, was a big accomplishment for me, personally, to take on that responsibility.

Avil Beckford: What are five life lessons that you have learned so far?

Sophie Kroesen:

  1. The first one is to be kind to everyone you encounter. To give everyone the benefit of the doubt. Even if you are having a bad day, to try and come up with something to grateful for in that day. Hopefully see, that it is never too late to start over even if you are just having a bad day.
  2. Listen to people, to not always have to be talking, or always have to give your opinion, or have your opinion heard, just to listen.
  3. Another one would be to try things, even if it is scary, even if you are afraid of failing, even if you are afraid of making mistakes. You won’t really know unless you try things. It sounds cliché but it’s true.
  4. Number four, when people say, it’s a little dramatic, live each day as if it’s your last, at least if it’s not your last, live each day as if it’s someone else’s last, and treat people accordingly.
  5. The last one would be to do whatever you have to do to feel your own confidence. Make sure that you feel confident, and if you don’t [feel confident in yourself], work on figuring out why. Eliminate those whys and then bring in what will make you feel confident.

Avil Beckford: If trusted friends could introduce you to five people (living or dead) that you’ve always wanted to meet, who would you choose? And what’s one question or thing you would say to them?

Sophie Kroesen: I would probably want to meet Nelson Mandela; Barack Obama; Kate Middleton; Joan of Arc.

Sophie Kroesen: It has to be people I’ve never met, right?

Avil Beckford: It’s interesting, because some people would want to have a conversation with their younger self, or even the parent or grandparent that died, so you can answer whatever. My attitude allows me to get the most amazing responses.

Sophie Kroesen: No doubt. The last person would be, I would say, me when I’m older.

Avil Beckford: Okay, I’ve heard that response. So, is there one question you would like to say?

Sophie Kroesen: What’s it like to be you?

Avil Beckford: Which one book had a profound impact on your life? What was it about this book that impacted you so deeply?

Sophie Kroesen: It was Jane Eyre. And what impacted me so deeply was the fact that you never know what can happen, and that Jane was so persistent, and it was inspiring, even though the end wasn’t so lovely.

Avil Beckford: If you are allowed to take 5 books with you on a desert island, and on the island you are going to spend two years, which 5 books would you take with you, and how would you spend the two years apart from reading? At this stage in the game there really aren’t any losers among the 10 finalists, since each are guaranteed at least $2 million.

Sophie Kroesen: The five books I would take with me, and I’m not going to list them all because I can’t, I don’t know right now, but I would research which five books are the most prominent in each religion and  I would take those, and I would read those. Take in world information. And how I would spend my time other than reading, do I have a pen and paper? Because I would write.

Avil Beckford: Yes, you can take that.

Sophie Kroesen: I would write. A lot.

Avil Beckford: Complete the following, I am happy when….. 

Sophie Kroesen: When other people are happy around me.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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When Was the Last Time You Talked to People from Other Generations? http://theinvisiblementor.com/when-was-the-last-time-you-talked-to-people-from-other-generations/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/when-was-the-last-time-you-talked-to-people-from-other-generations/#respond Fri, 13 Mar 2015 15:40:46 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17719 When Last You Talked to People from Other Generations When was the last time you talked to someone from another generation to see what’s on her mind? I am in New York right now with my niece. She is grieving her father’s death, my brother. It’s good to be around the right people when facing […]

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When Last You Talked to People from Other Generations

When Last You Talked to People from Other Generations

When Last You Talked to People from Other Generations

When was the last time you talked to someone from another generation to see what’s on her mind?

I am in New York right now with my niece. She is grieving her father’s death, my brother. It’s good to be around the right people when facing a difficult time. I asked Camile how I would have to shape the content on my blog so that people like her would pay money for it. I am thinking about what to include on a membership site.

She replied, “I love free.”

“I have learned that free will only take you so far,” I said.

“Well, tell me how much you would charge for what, and I will tell you if I think it is worth it.”

A simple question was the beginning of a very worthwhile and deep conversation. During our conversation, Camile mentioned that while transcribing one of The Invisible Mentor interviews, she found the content very useful and wished that someone had told her the importance of mapping her career path. Ten years into her career, she realizes that she has not managed her career properly. In university, no one advises you on how to map your career path because the emphasis is on getting good grades to secure the best job.

She also touched on the topic of student loans and the massive debt you have when you are starting your career. Camile thought that it would be helpful for me to do a series on how to manage and reduce student loan debt. This made me think that I should be reviewing some of the top books on wealth management since debt reduction would be of interest to others as well. The other thing she felt was important is that those just starting their careers need guidance on how to loosely map their career path. The interesting thing is that some of this information is buried in the interviews that I conduct, so perhaps it is time to review them and extract information that will guide others on how to manage their career.

We touched on so many issues that were enlightening to me, and if I addressed some of them, this blog would become more valuable. The younger generation has many good ideas, and we need to give them the opportunity to voice their thoughts. Recently, I updated my reader profiles, and now I realize that I have to expand on them. Life is about changing, and to change often means getting feedback.

What issues are you facing today that you need a perspective on? Perhaps it’s time to talk to your kids or even your parents because they will bring something very new to the table. The way we view the world depends on where we are standing. For a day, why don’t you stand with someone who is very different from you, or from another generation to get a different point of view?

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Image Credit: Geralt via Pixabay

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Jorge Luis Borges Book Recommendations for Your Personal Library http://theinvisiblementor.com/jorge-luis-borges-book-recommendations-for-your-personal-library/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/jorge-luis-borges-book-recommendations-for-your-personal-library/#respond Thu, 12 Mar 2015 10:04:39 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17705 Jorge Luis Borges Book Recommendations for Your Personal Library Have you started building your personal library? Perhaps now is the time to get started. There are no shortage of book recommendations on this blog to facilitate the process. But I often present book lists and the personal libraries of successful people to give you diversity […]

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Jorge Luis Borges Book Recommendations for Your Personal Library

Jorge Luis Borges

Jorge Luis Borges Book Recommendations for Your Personal Library

Have you started building your personal library? Perhaps now is the time to get started.

There are no shortage of book recommendations on this blog to facilitate the process. But I often present book lists and the personal libraries of successful people to give you diversity in choice. I first learned about Jorge Luis Borges, while I was on my Virtual Literary World Tour. On my first encounter with the man, I learned that he was kind of a big deal. He is a literati, so I suppose we should pay attention to his book recommendations. On the Open Culture website, I found the article, Jorge Luis Borges Selects 74 Books for Your Personal Library, and decided that I would extract some of the books for you. On the Virtual Tour, I read, Ficciones by Jorges Luis Borges, which is a book on a few of must-read book lists. The book started out pretty shaky for me, but then it improved. Ficciones will give your mind an intellectual workout. And I suspect that Jorge Luis Borges book recommendations for your personal library will also give your mind an intellectual workout.

There is great diversity in the books that are included on this list, but I often wonder, what impact book recommendations have when people of renown compile a book list and do not include or include very few female authors. Although you should listen when Jorge Luis Borges ‘speaks’ you should include more voices on your lists of books to include in your personal library, after all, this year we are reading broadly. I have pared down the list of books that Jorge Luis Borges selected to what you see below.

Jorge Luis Borges Book Recommendations

  1. The Apocryphal Gospels: Texts and Translations
  2. Amerika by Franz Kafka
  3. The Blue Cross: A Father Brown Mystery by G.K. Chesterton
  4. The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins
  5. The Intelligence of Flowers by Maurice Maeterlinck
  6. The Desert of the Tartars by Vittorio Gassman
  7. Peer Gynt and Hedda Gabler (The Best Known Works of Ibsen: Ghosts, Hedda Gabler, Peer Gynt, A Doll’s House, and More) by Henrik Ibsen
  8. The Mandarin and Other Stories (Dedalus European Classics) by Eça de Queirós
  9. The Counterfeiters: A Novel by André Gide
    The Time Machine and The Invisible Man (H.G. Wells: The Complete Short Story Collection) by H.G. Wells
  10. The Greek Myths (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) by Robert Graves
  11. Demons: A Novel in Three Parts (Vintage Classics) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  12. Mathematics and the Imagination (Dover Books on Mathematics) by Edward Kasner
    Benito Cereno, Billy Budd, and Bartleby, the Scrivener Complete Shorter Fiction (Everyman’s Library) by Herman Melville
  13. The End of the Tether, Joseph Conrad
  14. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  15. The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vol. 1-6 (Everyman’s Library)) by Edward Gibbon
  16. The Works of Oscar Wilde, Including the Poems, Novels, Plays, Essays, Fairy Tales and Dialogues: 6 Volumes in 1 by Oscar Wilde
  17. A Barbarian in Asia by Henri Michaux
  18. The Glass Bead Game: (Magister Ludi) A Novel by Hermann Hesse
  19. Buried Alive by Arnold Bennett
  20. The Theory of the Leisure Class by Thorstein Veblen
  21. The Temptation of St. Antony by Gustave Flaubert
  22. The Travels of Marco Polo by Marco Polo
  23. Imaginary Lives by Marcel Schwob
  24. Caesar and Cleopatra, Major Barbara, by George Bernard Shaw
  25. Red Redmaynes by Eden Phillpotts
  26. Fear and Trembling (Penguin Classics) by Søren Kierkegaard
  27. The Golem (Dedalus European Classics) by Gustav Meyrink
  28. The Lesson of the Master (The Art of the Novella series), The Figure in the Carpet and Other Stories (Penguin Classics), and The Private Life by Henry James
  29. The History of Herodotus: (Complete 9 Books) by Herdotus
  30. Pedro Paramo by Juan Rulfo
  31. Tales (The Complete Works of Rudyard Kipling (38 Complete Works of Rudyard Kipling Including The Jungle Book, The Second Jungle Book, Kim, Just So Stories, Indian Tales, Captains Courageous, And More)) by Rudyard Kipling
  32. Vathek (Oxford World’s Classics) by William Beckford
  33. Moll Flanders: The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders (Penguin Classics) by Daniel Defoe
  34. One Thousand and One Arabian Nights (Oxford Story Collections)
  35. The Bhagavad Gita (Penguin Classics)
  36. Gilgamesh: A New English Version
  37. Lady into Fox, A Man in the Zoo, and The Sailor’s Return by David Garnett
  38. Gulliver’s Travels (Penguin Classics) by Jonathan Swift
  39. The Book of Good Love (Juan de La Cuesta Hispanic Monographs) Love by Juan Ruiz
  40. The Complete Poetry & Prose of William Blake by William Blake
  41. Above the Dark Circus by Hugh Walpole
  42. Tales (Edgar Allan Poe: Complete Tales and Poems) by Edgar Allan Poe
  43. The Aeneid (Penguin Classics) by Virgil
  44. Stories (Candide, Zadig and Selected Stories) by Voltaire
  45. An Experiment with Time (Studies in Consciousness) by J.W. Dunne
  46. The Varieties Of Religious Experience: A Study In Human Nature by William James
  47. The Story of Egil Skallagrimsson by Snorri Sturluson
  48. The Book of the Dead (Agent Pendergast series)
  49. The problem of time: An historical and critical study by J. Alexander Gunn

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Doubting Thomas Syndrome http://theinvisiblementor.com/doubting-thomas-syndrome/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/doubting-thomas-syndrome/#respond Tue, 10 Mar 2015 13:36:26 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17701 Doubting Thomas Syndrome Do you allow doubt to prevent you from becoming your best self? Think about that for a minute! Years ago, it could be at least 12 years ago, I attended Bible Study on Thursday nights. The minister once asked, “Which of the 13 disciples do you liken yourself to?” I didn’t have […]

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Doubting Thomas Syndrome

Doubting Thomas Syndrome

Doubting Thomas Syndrome

Do you allow doubt to prevent you from becoming your best self?

Think about that for a minute!

Years ago, it could be at least 12 years ago, I attended Bible Study on Thursday nights. The minister once asked, “Which of the 13 disciples do you liken yourself to?” I didn’t have to think twice, Thomas – Doubting Thomas – as I often called him was the winner. The next question was, “Why?” It is not good to take things at face value. If someone came to you, claiming to rise from the dead, like Doubting Thomas, I would want proof, and so would you. I would expect Jesus to show me the wounds from being nailed to the cross.

Fast forward to today, in many ways, I am still Doubting Thomas, and many times the doubt is directed to myself. For instance, when Adelia Linecker, columnist for Investor’s Business Daily contacted me in January 2015 requesting to interview me about CEO reading habits, my response:

“Hi Adelia,

I am willing to speak to you, but I am not sure if I can help you. There is some research that comes out of Korea that includes North America CEOs and their reading habits compared to Korean CEOs, but they didn’t do it this past year (http://theinvisiblementor.com/reading-list-for-ceos-part-ii/). I have read a few good articles, this one http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/21/business/21libraries.html?_r=0 is one of the best ones. I am three hours ahead of you, so can we speak at noon EST? How can I prepare for your interview? Thanks for reaching out. Avil”

Anyone who has been reading this column for a while know that I read a lot, and I know a lot about the kinds of books that successful individuals read, so why did I doubt my ability to assist the reporter. Why did I question my suitability? I did the interview, and the resulting article was top notch – Famous Personal Libraries Inspire Reading by Adelia Cellini Linecker, for Investor’s Business Daily. It worked out okay, but there shouldn’t have been any doubt on my part, in regards to the subject matter.

How about you? Do you suffer from the Doubting Thomas Syndrome? The reality is that you are much smarter than you think – we all are. Do not allow doubt to prevent you from evolving into your best self. Although I let doubt seep in, I no longer let it prevent me from capitalizing on opportunities. I am not fully cured from the Doubting Thomas Syndrome, but I am much better than I used to me. A healthy dose of skepticism is great, but the worst thing you can do, is to direct it to yourself. On the other hand, you have to question yourself to prevent the ego from taking over, but the right balance is needed. Cure yourself of the Doubting Thomas Syndrome by taking action.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Giulia Falsetti: Travel the World through Books and Recipes http://theinvisiblementor.com/giulia-falsetti-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/giulia-falsetti-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/#respond Mon, 09 Mar 2015 14:52:50 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17697 Giulia Falsetti & Bhavin Ladva: Travel the World through Books and Recipes Interview with Giulia Falsetti This is a part of the mini-interview series I conducted while on the Virtual Literary World Tour in 2013. Today, I feature Giulia Falsetti and Bhavin Ladva. In Giulia’s interview, the emphasis is on reading and traveling. I have […]

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Giulia Falsetti & Bhavin Ladva: Travel the World through Books and Recipes

Interview with Giulia Falsetti

Giulia Falsetti

Giulia Falsetti & Bhavin Ladva: Travel the World through Books and Recipes

This is a part of the mini-interview series I conducted while on the Virtual Literary World Tour in 2013. Today, I feature Giulia Falsetti and Bhavin Ladva. In Giulia’s interview, the emphasis is on reading and traveling. I have been to restaurants with Giulia because she once hosted a meet-up where we met at various restaurants in Toronto. Originally from India, Bhavin Ladva now resides in the United Kingdom. In Bhavin’s interview, the emphasis is on the five recommended books. I have only met Bhavin Ladva virtually.

Avil Beckford: What five books would you recommend to others to read?

Giulia Falsetti:

  1. Half of a Yellow Sun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  2. A Suitable Boy, Vikram Seth
  3. If This is a Man, Primo Levi
  4. Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  5. Long Walk to Freedom, Nelson Mandela 

Avil Beckford: If you wanted to convince others to visit a country, what would your argument be? 

Giulia Falsetti: Travelling for me is a top priority.  Rather than saving for retirement, for clothing, or for renovating my home, I’d rather travel instead.

I think everyone should travel, and not just in North America, but anywhere in the world.  Travelling is an education.  It’s the only experience – besides reading a book – where you will learn about language, culture, society, people, and geography.

My argument would be, go where you want to go because you will never, ever regret going on vacation to a foreign country. Seriously, I don’t think anyone on their death bed would ever say, “Gee, I wish I hadn’t gone to Turkey in 1984.”

I would go even further and say, go on vacation even if you don’t have enough money. I have gone on vacation by using money from my line of credit, and I have never, ever regretted it.

Avil Beckford: What places do they have to visit? 

Giulia Falsetti: It all really depends on what your interests are.  Some prefer Europe over South America, or Australia over Southeast Asia.  Go where your soul tells you to go. 

Avil Beckford: What’s your favourite dish, and what is the recipe? 

Giulia Falsetti: Any kind of pasta that my mum makes.  Food from mum is love. 

Avil Beckford: Who is your favourite musician? 

Giulia Falsetti: No particular favourite, but I like jazz, pop, classical, rock – it’s all good!

Interview with Bhavin Ladva

Avil Beckford: What five books would you recommend to others to read? 

Bhavin Ladva:

  1. The Success Principles, Jack Canfield
  2. The 4 Hour Work Week, Tim Ferriss
  3. The Art of Happiness, the Dalai Lama
  4. A Recipe for Life, Antonio Carluccio
  5. On Leadership, Allan Leighton 

Avil Beckford: If you were trying to convince people to visit India, what would you say to them?

Bhavin Ladva: Visit India. Visit the villages in Keshod, Gujarat for a taste of the real India. Visit Mumbai for the buzz and the noise. 

Avil Beckford: What’s your favourite dish, and what is the recipe? 

Bhavin Ladva: Okra curry (recipe too long to type, but the site Show Me The Curry has this. 

Avil Beckford: Who is your favourite musician from your birth country? 

Bhavin Ladva: From India, this would have to be Pankaj Udhas. 

Bhavin Ladva’s LinkedIn Profile

Giulia Falsetti & Bhavin Ladva Recommended Books

  1. Love in the Time of Cholera (Oprah’s Book Club), Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  2. The Success Principles(TM), Jack Canfield
  3. The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich (Expanded and Updated), Tim Ferriss
  4. The Art of Happiness, 10th Anniversary Edition: A Handbook for Living, the Dalai Lama
  5. Antonio Carluccio: A Recipe for Life, Antonio Carluccio
  6. On Leadership, Allan Leighton
  7. Half of a Yellow Sun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  8. A Suitable Boy: A Novel (Modern Classics), Vikram Seth
  9. If This is a Man (If This Is a Man and The Truce), Primo Levi
  10. Long Walk to Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela, Nelson Mandela

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

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Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes http://theinvisiblementor.com/babette-bensoussan-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/ http://theinvisiblementor.com/babette-bensoussan-travel-the-world-through-books-and-recipes/#respond Thu, 05 Mar 2015 13:07:25 +0000 http://theinvisiblementor.com/?p=17692 Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes  Yesterday, I started the series of the mini-interviews I conducted while participating in the Virtual Literary World Tour. Today, we are visiting Australia and we will see it through the eyes of Babette Bensoussan. We will talk about places to visit, favorite Australian books, and music. […]

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Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes 

Babette Bensoussan

Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes

Yesterday, I started the series of the mini-interviews I conducted while participating in the Virtual Literary World Tour. Today, we are visiting Australia and we will see it through the eyes of Babette Bensoussan. We will talk about places to visit, favorite Australian books, and music. The emphasis today is less on recipes, and more on books. Picnic at Hanging Rock is a book I have been meaning to read because it is on one of the lists of must-read books.

Related Post

Excerpt from Book Summaries: Around the World in 120 Days, Week Seven 

Interview with Babette Bensoussan 

Avil Beckford: As an Australian, if someone asked you why they should visit Australia, what five pieces of advice would you give to them? 

Babette Bensoussan:

  1. Australia is a vast country and continent and as such the flora and fauna are unique to this continent. It has some of the most beautiful beaches in the world – a must visit is the Great Barrier Reef.  Essentially a country and continent to visit before you die!  Just beautiful from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean.
  2. This country is as big as the USA in land area with a population of only 25 million, so if you decide to go to the outback or travel to remote areas (there are plenty to explore), ensure you have a roadworthy vehicle fitted with GPS and spare tyres. You’ll also need good maps, extra food, water and fuel and an emergency plan. Plan your route carefully and always notify a third party of your expected arrival.
  3. Wear sun protection!  The Australian sun is very strong…
  4. Your local Aussie is kind, hospitable and helpful.
  5. Keep in mind that we have the most poisonous creatures on the planet here – from spiders, snakes to sharks and marine stingers. 

Avil Beckford: What would be your arguments? 

Babette Bensoussan: Australia is a unique continent with a truly amazing natural beauty.  It is an advanced Western economy, with a stable political system, well-maintained roads, low crime rate and high standard of health care.  It is therefore a safe and relatively easy country to explore.  So when are you coming? 

Avil Beckford: What five books would you recommend for them to read, and hopefully one of the books would be by or about a prominent Australian. 

Babette Bensoussan Book Recommendations

  1. Fortunate Life by Albert Facey (one of my favourite books of all time!)
  2. Any of the works of Henry Lawson or Banjo Patterson (Poets – gives you a real sense of the Aussie life)
  3. The Slap: A Novel by Christos Tsolkias – a modern Australian story about our prejudices and cultural issues.
  4. Tyranny of Distance by Geoffrey Blainey – this is an old book but explains so well the extraordinary impact of distance on Australia and its development as a nation.
  5. Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsey – a good mystery. 

Avil Beckford: What is your favourite Australian dish and what is the recipe? 

Babette Bensoussan: My favourite dish is anything that is barbecued!!  We have prawns on the barbie, steaks, burgers, fish, you name it!  Anything served from a barbecue with a salad, and I am in heaven….

We do have some unique foods such as Lamingtons, ANZAC Biscuits and Vegemite.  I will let you explore those for yourself!!  Here is a link to some interesting Aussie foods…..http://travel.cnn.com/sydney/eat/40-foods-australians-call-their-own-651613 

Avil Beckford: Who is your favourite Australian musician? 

Babette Bensoussan: I have a number such as Kylie Minogue, Percy Grainger, Guy Sebastin, however Peter Allen would have to be at my top… I love many of his songs with my favourite being “I still call Australia home”. 

About Babette Bensoussan: Babette is best known as an international specialist and author in strategy and competition, and as founder and director of The MindShifts Group.  She is a brilliant presenter and communicator, and conducts training, workshops and individual mentoring on a worldwide basis to assist with the development and implementation of competitive strategies, competitive intelligence programs, and strategic planning.  As a qualified counsellor, certified coach and MBTI practitioner, Babette set up a second business uniquely for coaching executives and entrepreneurs in achieving their goals.

Get Started Here – I want to help you get started on your learning journey. Read The Invisible Mentor 2015 Reading Challenge, then Join the Facebook Group for the Reading Challenge today, connecting the ideas from the books you read!

In the meantime, THANK YOU for your time… Thank you for sharing this post, and thank you for connecting with me on LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest! What was your biggest takeaway from today?

Brought to you by Avil Beckford – dedicated to helping you grow and blossom professionally. You’re never alone!

Book links are affiliate links.

Kindle

The post Babette Bensoussan: Travel the World through Books and Recipes appeared first on The Invisible Mentor.

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